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This trip is totally doable, but does require some planning and care. Will definitely be much easier once the EVgo station in Baker is open.
How many miles of range did you have when you got to Vctorville?

I live in the Valley, I'd like to know if it's possible with just a single 45 minute DCFC session each way. I'm thinking drive straight to Baker and charge for 45 minutes and then drive all the way to Vegas. On the way back drive straight to Victorville and charge for 45 minutes and finish the trip.

Baker is just shy of 200Mi from my house. It's where we normally stop on the way to Vegas anyways.

Victorville is 190 miles from where we normally stay in Vegas.

In either case you'd be pulling up to the charge station with less than 15% remaining (probably closer to 5% when you get to Baker) but that's going to give you the most efficient fast charging so getting another 100 miles of range in 45 minutes should be completely doable.

Biggest risk is you are cutting it mighty close on the trip to Baker and if for whatever reason you can't charge there you don't even have enough range to get to the closest L2 stations in Stateline (Primm) or Barstow. So you'd literally have to L1 charge in Baker for several hours just to get enough range to get to the next L2 station.
 

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Biggest risk is you are cutting it mighty close on the trip to Baker and if for whatever reason you can't charge there you don't even have enough range to get to the closest L2 stations in Stateline (Primm) or Barstow. So you'd literally have to L1 charge in Baker for several hours just to get enough range to get to the next L2 station.
The charging lot at Baker should have L2 charging available. I don't mean that it is required or announced - just that you'd have to be pretty f*cking stupid to install multiple units that pull over 100 kW and NOT also install a (much cheaper) 2-headed J1772 unit that pulls 6 kW.

Every EVgo install that I have seen around where I live have (at least) one J1772 unit next to the DCFCs.
 

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The charging lot at Baker should have L2 charging available. I don't mean that it is required or announced - just that you'd have to be pretty f*cking stupid to install multiple units that pull over 100 kW and NOT also install a (much cheaper) 2-headed J1772 unit that pulls 6 kW.

Every EVgo install that I have seen around where I live have (at least) one J1772 unit next to the DCFCs.
Thanks but what I'm worried about is copper/breaker thieves that could steal components and leave the entire site out of service. This has already happened to several Supercharger sites in California.

https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/multiple-ca-supercharger-locations-down-in-past-5-months-breakdowns-vandalism-or-theft.87748/

Though that gets me thinking, there's already a large 20 bay Supercharger in Baker, I wonder if those also include Tesla L2 chargers, and if they do if a non-Tesla could use one of those with a Tesla Tap?
 

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How many miles of range did you have when you got to Vctorville?

I live in the Valley, I'd like to know if it's possible with just a single 45 minute DCFC session each way. I'm thinking drive straight to Baker and charge for 45 minutes and then drive all the way to Vegas. On the way back drive straight to Victorville and charge for 45 minutes and finish the trip.

Baker is just shy of 200Mi from my house. It's where we normally stop on the way to Vegas anyways.
I had 57% SOC at Victorville after driving about 100 miles from the west side of LA.

Google Maps shows my house at 201 miles from the Thermometer in Baker, so I'm inclined to try it that way as well once the station is in. You'd just need to average at least 3.4 m/kWh, which should be easy. I got like 3.9 on that stretch in the summer with AC and going 70 mph.

For the leg from Baker to Vegas note that large parts of it are slow uphill inclines - I got only 3.5 m/kWh on that leg which means you need 45% to 50% SOC or so to feel comfortable.

Latest I heard on the Baker station was that they are hoping for May.
 

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The Baker charger should be online soon, and it will be really handy.
I think I speak for all of us in thanking you for your contributions to the community.

I'm still confused; "...Chevy says the Bolt EV can charge at "up to 80 kilowatts,"." Is this true or not?

If true;
What are the exact minimum specifications that the Baker EVgo would need to have in order to actually charge a Bolt at that rate?

Is there a way to obtain these specs from EVgo prior to this station opening?

I would be more than happy to take the hike down there (98.2 Miles from my door) to test it, if indeed it is actually worthwhile.
 

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Thank you!

The "80 kW" charger is a reference that was made in the Owner's Manual, and the reasons GM had for stating it are still up for debate. Most likely, it was meant to describe a charger that has high enough amperage to charge the Bolt EV at its highest rate. So GM could have been describing a 500 V @ 160 A charger, or a 400 V @ 200 A charger. The charger displayed in their Bolt EV testing video was 500 V @ 175 A (87 kW).

A few considerations here are:

-Based on the reports so far, the Bolt EV will not ask for more than 150 A, but the report I read didn't test lower than 40% state of charge. A 150 A charging rate would result in an average charge rate of ~ 53 kW from 0% to 55% battery. So in that way, it's not really different than Hyundai/Kia quoting 100 kW charging on the Ioniq/Soul EVs when they actually only charge at about 70 kW peak.

-If there is an additional step down in charging rate under 40% (say 0% to 20% or 30%), it could be at either 175 A or 200 A, neither of which would be a true 80 kW. It would be either a 60 kW or 70 kW peak charging rate, but it could support other reports of a 60 kW rate quoted by GM as well as the requirement for an 80 kW charger.

-The Bolt EV's charging rates are very temperature sensitive. Even a few degrees below normal operating temperature, and the Bolt EV will limit charging to 100 A. It's possible the Bolt EV will step up from 150 A if the conditions are acceptable.

-The Bolt EV's display shows net power in and out of the battery, and my observations while DC charging are that the net power from the charger can be reduced by as much as 5 to 10 kW. It's possible that a 160 A service (80 kW) could be enough to power both battery conditioning and still maximize the battery's charge rate. In other words, you could charge at the maximum rate the entire time without slowing down to cool the battery.
 

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I recently did a couple of videos with a bit of an update on this.
Thanks for your videos! Great content!

I noticed that in your video your energy efficiency seemed better than the what people claimed at the start of this thread. Did I misunderstand, or do you think it's due to your swapping out the wheels for lighter-weight ones?

The Baker charger should be online soon, and it will be really handy.
Yeah, any day now…

… is what we'll be saying next year. ;)
 

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Thanks for your videos! Great content!

I noticed that in your video your energy efficiency seemed better than the what people claimed at the start of this thread. Did I misunderstand, or do you think it's due to your swapping out the wheels for lighter-weight ones?
Because of the slight elevation increase, I think the rim swap would have a measurable efficiency difference, but not by a huge margin. If it was more than 2-3%, I would be surprised. For a trip like Los Angeles to Las Vegas, the changes in weather will cause far more variance.


Yeah, any day now…

… is what we'll be saying next year. ;)
Heh, I hear you. I've been waiting on that charger for nearly a year now. That's partly why I made the video. I don't want people waiting around like they can't make the trip already. Between Victorville and Primm, Bolt EV owners have two really good safety nets. The biggest issue is the return from Las Vegas (but not really, if you leave Vegas with 100%).
 

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Heh, I hear you. I've been waiting on that charger for nearly a year now. That's partly why I made the video. I don't want people waiting around like they can't make the trip already. Between Victorville and Primm, Bolt EV owners have two really good safety nets. The biggest issue is the return from Las Vegas (but not really, if you leave Vegas with 100%).

I emailed evgo last week because I was about to make the trip and had read that construction was done. They responded that they couldn't give an opening date and were waiting on approvals. I presume that means inspections and testing, stuff they can't control.

Leaving Vegas last Friday for the drive back to LA, the weather was an issue. I stopped at Primm for an hour to get back to 95% before attempting the drive into a fierce headwind. Spent most of the drive behind various trucks and RVs (safe distance, not tailgating). In the windiest section with open highway in front of me it took 40kW just to maintain 65 mph on level ground. Without some help with the wind it wouldn't have been possible to make it from Primm to Victorville. It might have been hard to make it from Baker to Victorville.
 

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The biggest issue is the return from Las Vegas (but not really, if you leave Vegas with 100%).
If getting to Baker on a single charge really is doable the last variable for me is if one can pick up enough extra range in Victorville in 45 minutes to make it the last ~100 miles to my house. If so it would truly be possible to make the trip with only one charging stop in each direction.
 

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Leaving Vegas last Friday for the drive back to LA, the weather was an issue. I stopped at Primm for an hour to get back to 95% before attempting the drive into a fierce headwind. Spent most of the drive behind various trucks and RVs (safe distance, not tailgating). In the windiest section with open highway in front of me it took 40kW just to maintain 65 mph on level ground. Without some help with the wind it wouldn't have been possible to make it from Primm to Victorville. It might have been hard to make it from Baker to Victorville.
I'm surprised by that, it's only 190 miles from the hotel we typically stay at to the Victor Valley Mall, I would think that leaving Vegas at /near 100% getting to Victorville wouldn't be an issue even without a stop in Stateline/Primm. What was your remaining range when you got to Victorville?
 

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I'm surprised by that, it's only 190 miles from the hotel we typically stay at to the Victor Valley Mall, I would think that leaving Vegas at /near 100% getting to Victorville wouldn't be an issue even without a stop in Stateline/Primm. What was your remaining range when you got to Victorville?
27% battery left at Victorville. I could have made it from Vegas, but I was definitely more comfortable with the stop at the state line and didn't feel like I had to stay behind slow-moving traffic the entire drive, just most of it. The wind was howling, with one section measured over 30 mph steady with gusts well into the 50s. Plug that into a range calculator and see what you get.

It was my first time trying the trip and I was cautious. Next time I'll likely be able to have my only stop be 15 minutes in Baker each way.
 
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