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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I'm really close to getting a Bolt, and I had a question on how it logs charging activity, as it's somewhat crucial to my situation. The majority of my charging will be done at work on a Level 2 for free (yay). But I do want the confidence of being able to charge at home on a 120V outlet if I absolutely need to.

Here's the problem, I live in a really old duplex with parking on the ground level. The 120V 3-prong outlet in the garage is actually hooked up to my downstairs neighbor's meter (we're on the top level).

I would like to approach my downstairs neighbor (who's super friendly and eco-conscious) for me to use the outlet in my garage to charge my vehicle, and I would reimburse him via Paypal every month for the total kwh I charge on that outlet (at LA DWP's kwh rate). In order for me to do this, I'll need to be able to see some sort of charging history or log in the Bolt, where I can easily see the charge levels for all my at-home charging and distinguish it from the kwh I charged at work.

Is this possible?

I'm currently a renter so re-wiring the house to be on my meter or upgrading to level 2 is really not a viable option for me at this point. Thanks for your help!

Ben
 

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If there is a log of total charging on the Bolt I don't know how to access it. However, it would not surprise me if such a things exists.

Maybe you could get something like an inline meter for the outlet you plan on using. The closest I can find is a "Kill A Watt". It store the accumulative KWH used in non-volatile memory. Your neighbor would have to trust you to not reset it or bypass it.

The KWH recorded by a meter is going to be a bit more than what is added to your battery due to charging inefficiency, but it's still pretty efficient.

Is your rate a function of time (cheaper at night) where you live? If so you can program your Bolt to charge at that time. You'll want to work that out with your neighbor too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you!

This Kill A Watt thing looks like the perfect and simplest solution. And I think my neighbors trust me enough that I wouldn't pull any funny business and reset the counter.

As far as time-related savings, that would require my downstairs neighbors to install a new smart meter, which I think requires some initial capital investment, so I will likely forgo that given that my charging at home will be relatively low.
 

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You're welcome, but I just found this page claiming it melted with long term use. Maybe that's just a glitch, but read it and see what you think. If you've already ordered the Kill A Watt it's a really handy device to have in any case.
 

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Note that some of the Kill-A-Watts (e.g. the P4400) will not retain the kWh data if power is lost. So make sure you get one that does (e.g. P4460).

As far as time-related savings, that would require my downstairs neighbors to install a new smart meter, which I think requires some initial capital investment, so I will likely forgo that given that my charging at home will be relatively low.
The electric company usually installs the smart meter - I'd be surprised if LA didn't already have them fully deployed. But even if your neighbor were on a TOU rate plan, for 12 hours of 12A 120V charging you'd save a maximum of 88 cents by charging at night versus charging in the middle of the day. And that's only in the summer - it's about 7 cents savings during the rest of the year. (This is based on the rate tables from the LA DWP site)
 

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Note that some of the Kill-A-Watts (e.g. the P4400) will not retain the kWh data if power is lost. So make sure you get one that does (e.g. P4460).
Good point. I happen to have the P4460, so I assumed they all worked that way.

As to the melting - that article was from 2012. Maybe it's gotten better, but there are still some people complaining about melting in the Amazon reviews for the P4460. I actually used the P4460 with my Bolt with the 12 amp setting for about a week without incident. If you're worried about it maybe start with 8 amps for a while, and then carefully monitor 12 amps. With circuit breakers you're not supposed to exceed 80% of the rated value for sustained loads. If the same rule applied here (which it doesn't really) then 12 amps would be the upper limit (80% of 15 amps).

Anyway, good luck. Sorry for the back and forth with the melting thing.
 

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I like the Rosewill Energy Monitor better than the Kill-A-Watt meter because the display is separate from the plug in part so you can place it at a convenient viewing location.

They're out of stock at newegg, but search for "Rosewill - RHSP-13001" on ebay and they're available for $25.



 
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