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Discussion Starter #1
Summary: 240 mi, 64 kWh, 1 charge stop
I kept the cruise control set between 65 and 70 the whole trip. Climate control set at 74 but A/C didn't run much because it wasn't a hot day (climate used 2%)

Left Los Gatos (228 ft elev) with a full charge.

Arrived Auburn (1200 ft elev) 156 miles, 38 kWh used, est. 87 miles remaining
Charged at EVGO. After first 30 minute cycle was at about 60% with est.149 miles remaining.
Started a second cycle and stopped it at 75% with est. 178 miles remaining.
Total charge time about 45 minutes. I stopped it early because I was getting impatient.

Arrived Donner Summit (7200 ft elev) 214 miles, 60 kWh used, est. 72 miles remaining.
All downhill from here!

Arrived Tahoe City (6200 ft elev) 240 miles, 64 kWh used, est. 69 miles remaining.
 

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Thanks for the details on your journey. If I ran your numbers correctly, and making an assumption about the EVGO plan used (Flex), you paid $4.95 to attach to EVGO and then .20 a minute (45) for 91 miles of charge. That works out to $13.95 (45*.20 + 4.95 hookup). You ended up paying $13.95 for 91 miles of power. Figuring gas at $2.50/gal and 25 mpg to go 91 miles would use 3.64 gal and cost $9.10. I would have thought gas would be slightly more expensive than electric, not the other way around. But, I've not done any trips yet where I have to charge as my solar at home fills the need so I'm curious as to how the charges stack up.

Also, do you happen to know how to get the 'lifetime' kwh used by the car without going to the app? I unintentionally erased past history by resetting the trip monitor and only have one half of my car's lifetime usage.
Thanks.
 

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Summary: 240 mi, 64 kWh, 1 charge stop
I kept the cruise control set between 65 and 70 the whole trip. Climate control set at 74 but A/C didn't run much because it wasn't a hot day (climate used 2%)

Left Los Gatos (228 ft elev) with a full charge.

Arrived Auburn (1200 ft elev) 156 miles, 38 kWh used, est. 87 miles remaining
Charged at EVGO. After first 30 minute cycle was at about 60% with est.149 miles remaining.
Started a second cycle and stopped it at 75% with est. 178 miles remaining.
Total charge time about 45 minutes. I stopped it early because I was getting impatient.

Arrived Donner Summit (7200 ft elev) 214 miles, 60 kWh used, est. 72 miles remaining.
All downhill from here!

Arrived Tahoe City (6200 ft elev) 240 miles, 64 kWh used, est. 69 miles remaining.
Are you staying someplace with a charger while you're there? I'm considering a nearly identical trip, and haven't sorted out charging while at the lake.
 

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Thanks for the details on your journey. If I ran your numbers correctly, and making an assumption about the EVGO plan used (Flex), you paid $4.95 to attach to EVGO and then .20 a minute (45) for 91 miles of charge. That works out to $13.95 (45*.20 + 4.95 hookup). You ended up paying $13.95 for 91 miles of power. Figuring gas at $2.50/gal and 25 mpg to go 91 miles would use 3.64 gal and cost $9.10. I would have thought gas would be slightly more expensive than electric, not the other way around. But, I've not done any trips yet where I have to charge as my solar at home fills the need so I'm curious as to how the charges stack up.

Also, do you happen to know how to get the 'lifetime' kwh used by the car without going to the app? I unintentionally erased past history by resetting the trip monitor and only have one half of my car's lifetime usage.
Thanks.
I've often read that using an EV for longer trips sometimes doesn't work out "dollar for mile" opposed to utilizing an ICE. But then... if you don't have an ICE vehicle to use, renting one would then put your costs over the top from using your EV. Then also comes the convenience of not having to wait around during charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm charging on 120V at my house. Since I don't have to drive much or far it's working fine for this trip. Ridiculously long process though. There's an EVGO at the Save Mart in Tahoe City so that was my backup plan. I'll have an L2 charger installed here soon.
 

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I'm charging on 120V at my house. Since I don't have to drive much or far it's working fine for this trip. Ridiculously long process though. There's an EVGO at the Save Mart in Tahoe City so that was my backup plan. I'll have an L2 charger installed here soon.
For three years I charged with 110 at home (Nissan Leaf). I recently read someplace that charging at 110 was more expensive than 220...something about takes 4x longer for 1/2 the juice...as you can see I'm no electrician. Anyway, I now use level II at home since getting my Bolt.
 

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For three years I charged with 110 at home (Nissan Leaf). I recently read someplace that charging at 110 was more expensive than 220...something about takes 4x longer for 1/2 the juice...as you can see I'm no electrician. Anyway, I now use level II at home since getting my Bolt.
The home cost of charging at 110 vs 220 should be essentially the same. You are metered for energy (kW x time) and that is what the battery stores. These DCFC stations are clearly charging at a rate much higher than the energy they deliver. Hopefully in the future there will be enough of them so there is some competition.
 

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For three years I charged with 110 at home (Nissan Leaf). I recently read someplace that charging at 110 was more expensive than 220...something about takes 4x longer for 1/2 the juice...as you can see I'm no electrician. Anyway, I now use level II at home since getting my Bolt.
I was puzzled by this assertion, as you're billed by total kWh, and the only difference time could make is if it pushed you into a different TOD schedule. I did a little research, and some folks do assert that there is a slight difference based on 2 items that are proportional to charging time:

  • Overall efficiency of the charger at different voltage levels. Some claim that the electronics in the charger (which must step up 120 or 240 AC to high voltage DC) are optimized for 240, and the transfer of electricity is more efficient from 240.
  • Charging systems that represent a drag on current when charging is happening. This is commonly claimed to be battery temperature management systems which must drive pumps and/or fans. These represent a drain that is linear with time, and can be seen as a "tax" on charging.
Few posters (that I saw) claimed that the difference in overall efficiency of the transfer varied in a truly significant way.
 

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I was puzzled by this assertion, as you're billed by total kWh, and the only difference time could make is if it pushed you into a different TOD schedule. I did a little research, and some folks do assert that there is a slight difference based on 2 items that are proportional to charging time:

  • Overall efficiency of the charger at different voltage levels. Some claim that the electronics in the charger (which must step up 120 or 240 AC to high voltage DC) are optimized for 240, and the transfer of electricity is more efficient from 240.
  • Charging systems that represent a drag on current when charging is happening. This is commonly claimed to be battery temperature management systems which must drive pumps and/or fans. These represent a drain that is linear with time, and can be seen as a "tax" on charging.
Few posters (that I saw) claimed that the difference in overall efficiency of the transfer varied in a truly significant way.
Thanks, I just don't get the 20 hrs at 110 20 amp vs 8 hrs for 220 40 amp - yes I think I might be rounding up the amps, but the math is still off...is it not?
 

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And '110' is in actuality 120 volt, while '220' is really 240 volt.
 
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Thanks, I just don't get the 20 hrs at 110 20 amp vs 8 hrs for 220 40 amp - yes I think I might be rounding up the amps, but the math is still off...is it not?
20 hours at 12 amp, 120V (using EVSE that came with the vehicle) : 12*120=1.44 kW/hour, *20 (hours) is 28.8 kWh (pulled from the wall, less is stored in the battery - there is some loss)

8 hours at 32 amp, 240V (car's max) = 32*240=7.6 kW (car is maxed at 7.2kW? 30A?). 7.2*8 hours= 57.6 kWh (again, pulled from wall)

20 hours @ 12A/120V is NOT even close to the same energy delivered during 8 hours @ 30A/240V.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Thought I'd follow up with my return trip, Tahoe City to Los Gatos

Summary: 244 mi, 52.4 kWh, no charge stops

Left Tahoe City (6200 ft elev) with a full charge.

Arrived Donner Summit (7200 ft elev) 24.3 mi, 6.2 kWh used, 208 est. miles remaining. It's the proverbial "all downhill from here".

Gold Run rest stop (3300 ft elev) 58 mi, 8.5 kWh used, 266 est. miles remaining.

Los Gatos (228 ft elev) 244 mi, 52.4 kWh used, 40 est. miles remaining.

Time for an L2 charge!
 

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Day trip Berkeley CA to Sierra Nevada (Echo summit) and back.

Just FYI for those interested. Yesterday I drove from Berkeley to Wrights lake and back, with a detour to highway 88 for the way back. Total climbing 9200 feet. Distance 382 miles, Consumption 89.5 kwh. For 4.3 miles/kwh. Awesome car. (Just bought it 4 weeks ago) .
Details. I drove highways 80 and 50 to the Strawberry EVgo charger. (9 miles shy of Echo Summit). Distance 162 miles, Used 43.1 kwh. However, I had a pretty fierce tailwind so I don't think this is representative. I drove 63 mph on the flats but did the climb up 50 at 'normal' speed. I charged for 1 hour at the Strawberry EVgo charger. Put in 32 kWh. ( charger is 100 amps, so max 35 kW for a Bolt). Then up to Wrights lake at 7000 feet for a dayhike. Then back down to Kyburz (5400 ft) and up the silver fork road to highway 88 (at 7600 feet). Then down 88 and used highway 4 back to the bay area. Yes I did arrive home with ~2 kwh left. But what is math for if you don't use it.
I had had fierce headwind coming back across the central valley, so the 4.3 miles/kwh might be representative of going both ways without wind. Hard to know.
Added info: the Strawberry EVgo charger is a pretty nice place to spend 1 hour. (picture attached). Great (real) espresso at the little store with the chargers. Good maps for sale. Only cooked food was across the street at the Strawberry cafe. Only the bar part was open at 2pm. Mediocre hamburger for $13. People drinking at 2pm and watching bad television. My advice is get a take out lunch in Kyburz (9 miles before) and eat on the patio next to the charger.
 

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EVGO killed the attach fee a while ago.

...but you are required to go to the EVgo website and actively change it to the new plan. Those not paying attention will continue to pay the connection fee. You snooze, you lose...
 

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Not sure if the above comments are relevant to my post or an earlier one. However, I did not pay an attachment charge for EVGO.

Also, at 20 cents/minute and 35 kw, I was paying 34 cents/kwh . Which is more than I pay at home (2nd tier PGandE , about 27 cents). but not enough to matter.
 

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Family Camping with the Bolt.

Update: I just did the Berkeley to Strawberry trip again. 158 miles. ~6000 feet of net climbing. No tailwind this time. Also

4 people in the car, with tent, sleeping bags, stove, etc. cooler and some food. Used the heater a bit at the end.
This time it took ~50 kwh. or 3 mile/kwh avg. Arrived Strawberry with 8 kwh in the battery. So, no, you don't need to drive the "Other car" to go camping in the Sierra's with your family.
 
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