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Discussion Starter #1
I was at a stop sign and just about to drive off as I just noticed a lady walking her dogs in the crosswalk coming from left side to right who I scared to death! I said woooops didn't see you!
She was nice and smiled
I apologized to her and said its a huge blind spot here pointing to the roof support beam.
Thats my major dislike about Bolts so take my advice and be wary of this please.
 

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I find that same A-pillar often blocks the lower left traffic light. So I sometimes become late to get across at a left a turn as I become aware that oncoming has slowed to a stop. So I duck down to see the light above while not seeing it over to the left. Or under the visor. So yes...it's something I've become aware of.
 

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Agreed. The A pillar is huge, I have similar awareness of the blind spots it creates, but it's gotta support the weight of the battery.
 

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Bolt's A pillar is worthy of its own "yo mama" joke. Sometimes I want to install a sort of image projection technology using a video feed to make it virtually transparent.
14 year Old girl already invented one ... and she better be paid when all the vehicle manufacturers start producing these as standard /optional equipment.

 

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Safe driving requires a level of consciousness. All vehicles have visual obstructions of one sort or another as well as mechanical limitations. The title of this thread demonstrates a lack of responsibility, blaming the vehicle for driver error.
The Bolt is my 8th car. It also has far and away the worst visibility (both front and back). Not all vehicles have major visual obstructions.
 

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I wouldn't complain about a skinnier A pillar if it didn't mess with safety. That said, I find the visibility even out the front better than most cars I've owned. My garage is at a 90 degree angle to the driveway and I have to make a sharp right turn around bushes to get into the garage. With my Volt, I could never see the bottom right side of the garage door to see if the lazy USPS delivery person left a package there instead of the front door. With the Bolt's little triangular window in the corners of the dash, I can now see that area. Similar situations appear in parking lots and some intersections when I need to see low and to the left or right. All cars have A pillars and you get used to shifting your head a bit when needed as you are aware of them, whatever the size.

Mike
 

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Safe driving requires a level of consciousness. All vehicles have visual obstructions of one sort or another as well as mechanical limitations. The title of this thread demonstrates a lack of responsibility, blaming the vehicle for driver error.
14 year Old girl already invented one ... and she better be paid when all the vehicle manufacturers start producing these as standard /optional equipment.

Umm HELLO ...
 

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Really, any car that has the curtain air bag stuffed into the A pillar is going to have visibility issues in the front quarter. My Honda Fit, for example, has the same problem.
 

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Safe driving requires a level of consciousness. All vehicles have visual obstructions of one sort or another as well as mechanical limitations. The title of this thread demonstrates a lack of responsibility, blaming the vehicle for driver error.
100% correct.
 

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The Bolt is my 8th car. It also has far and away the worst visibility (both front and back). Not all vehicles have major visual obstructions.
What's your point? There's no way a little old lady walking dogs can get into your blind spot at a stop sign if you are driving properly and paying attention. My guess is the driver had his face stuck in a cellphone at the stop sign and the little old lady saw that and started across. My point is that blaming a piece of cold steel and plastic machinery for poor driving is irresponsible.
 

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Safe driving requires a level of consciousness. All vehicles have visual obstructions of one sort or another as well as mechanical limitations. The title of this thread demonstrates a lack of responsibility, blaming the vehicle for driver error.
This is not entirely accurate. While the first sentence is true, the conclusion is not. What this is is a blame-the-user mindset, where the design is the issue. Thing is, this design is not unique to the Bolt. Raked windshields are very common these days to reduce wind resistance and boost fuel economy, and because of safely requirements, A pillars have been made larger, and as in Bolts, additional mini vertical pillars are added as extra support.

So while a driver can be cognizant of larger A pillars and change behavior to be more attentive, the design itself makes this more difficult. I can say from personal experience that even looking carefully around the A pillars can result in things being missed. And pedestrians have as much responsibility to avoid walking in front of a moving vehicle as vehicles have to not hit pedestrians.
 

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This is not entirely accurate. While the first sentence is true, the conclusion is not. What this is is a blame-the-user mindset, where the design is the issue. Thing is, this design is not unique to the Bolt. Raked windshields are very common these days to reduce wind resistance and boost fuel economy, and because of safely requirements, A pillars have been made larger, and as in Bolts, additional mini vertical pillars are added as extra support.

So while a driver can be cognizant of larger A pillars and change behavior to be more attentive, the design itself makes this more difficult. I can say from personal experience that even looking carefully around the A pillars can result in things being missed. And pedestrians have as much responsibility to avoid walking in front of a moving vehicle as vehicles have to not hit pedestrians.
Lawyers would counter with "Once the issue is known to the user, and can be adjusted for by reasonable measures by the user (i.e. small and common movements of the head to appropriate vantage points), the design is not an issue in proper everyday use of vehicle."

Doesn't mean they ("they" being lawyers, who advise the insertion of clarifying statements, such as this execution of term "they") would be right.
 

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What's your point? There's no way a little old lady walking dogs can get into your blind spot at a stop sign if you are driving properly and paying attention. My guess is the driver had his face stuck in a cellphone at the stop sign and the little old lady saw that and started across. My point is that blaming a piece of cold steel and plastic machinery for poor driving is irresponsible.
Blind Spots are called blind spots for a reason... No one is 100% perfect checking blind spots.

While absolutely it is the Driver responsibility to check blind spots ...the Bottom line is the Pillar design in the Bolt is terrible and makes it MORE LIKELY that a driver will make a mistake.


Again though.. I'm shocked that not one person has not commented on this girls invention which would eliminate the bad pillar design...


 

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This is not entirely accurate. While the first sentence is true, the conclusion is not. What this is is a blame-the-user mindset, where the design is the issue. Thing is, this design is not unique to the Bolt. Raked windshields are very common these days to reduce wind resistance and boost fuel economy, and because of safely requirements, A pillars have been made larger, and as in Bolts, additional mini vertical pillars are added as extra support.

So while a driver can be cognizant of larger A pillars and change behavior to be more attentive, the design itself makes this more difficult. I can say from personal experience that even looking carefully around the A pillars can result in things being missed. And pedestrians have as much responsibility to avoid walking in front of a moving vehicle as vehicles have to not hit pedestrians.
Right, so before cars had backup cameras, all those kids who were backed over and killed by their parents.............it was the car's fault. Nonsense.

I repeat, no one can walk into the blind spot on the Bolt without being detected, if the driver is paying attention to the task at hand. That requires paying attention driving up to the stop sign, paying attention while at the stop sign, and paying attention while leaving the stop sign. That doesn't allow for texting, picking one's nose, applying mascara, eating a garlic butter bacon burger, etc.
 

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Blind Spots are called blind spots for a reason... No one is 100% perfect checking blind spots.

While absolutely it is the Driver responsibility to check blind spots ...the Bottom line is the Pillar design in the Bolt is terrible and makes it MORE LIKELY that a driver will make a mistake.


Again though.. I'm shocked that not one person has not commented on this girls invention which would eliminate the bad pillar design...


The invention is cool. I wonder how bright that projector lamp has to be and what it looks like from the outside (especially when it's getting dark). At night, it would likely illuminate the entire cabin.
 

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Yes, all vehicles today have much more obstructed sight lines than those of the 1950s and 1960s. Those thin A-pillars and four door hardtops had sightlines like a bicycle; essentially no visual obstruction. (They also had no airbags, no ABS, no seatbelts.)

Wonder if there's ever been a definitive study of accidental deaths because of obstructed sightlines versus lives saved by A-pillar airbags?

FWIW, at only 6'3", which is not exceptionally tall these days, the Bolt blind spot to the right front is such I have to position the driver's seat lower than I'd prefer. If I put the seat at the optimum position, the huge 'dust pan' behind the mirror and the huge A-pillar result in a blind spot which can hide an oncoming car to the right.

I had a couple of close calls making left turns at stop signs. Anything coming from the right smaller than a Suburban would be momentarily out of sight. Finally, I gave up and lowered the seat to get the eyesight line below the internal obstructions.

jack vines
 
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