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I’ve had my 2018 Bolt for 2 years and I’ve put over 86000 miles on it. I’m a Lyft/Uber driver.
I started hearing a rattling noise from the left front side and took it to the dealer today. They said the gearbox is shot and the struts need to be replaced.
Total cost $2700!
Of course the warranties have all expired.
I unfortunately leased this vehicle and have to come up with $25000 plus taxes next year. I hope I didn’t lease a lemon.
Anyone else had similar problems?
 

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You may be covered under the 8-year, 100,000 warranty, which covers a lot more than just the battery.

The warranty booklet for my 2020 Bolt lists “Electric drive unit assembly electric motors, and all internal components“.

The “gearbox” is a single unit, the electric drive unit assembly, which has both the electric motor and the fixed gears in one housing.

I’m not a GM warranty expert, but I would find out exactly which components have failed and need repairs, and then contact Chevy Customer Assistance Center, 1-877-486-5846.

With a $2,700 repair bill it’s certainly worth a phone call. Also, check your 2018 warranty booklet for the exact wording in that booklet, it may not be identical to what I have for my 2020 Bolt.

In my warranty booklet the pertinent paragraph is headed Electric/Hybrid Drive Unit.

Good luck!

Also, manufacturers sometimes extend free or reduced cost repairs even if a vehicle is no longer covered under warranty. That may or may not be the case for your repair, but asking doesn’t cost anything.

Please provide an update once you know more, as others may encounter this same repair issue down the road.
 

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"Gearbox"??? It's hard to imagine what could go wrong with that, and even if it does it ought to be covered by the powertrain warranty.

And I would assume that "struts" means the shock absorbers, which ought to be a heckuva lot cheaper to replace than that...
 

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"Gearbox"??? It's hard to imagine what could go wrong with that, and even if it does it ought to be covered by the powertrain warranty.

And I would assume that "struts" means the shock absorbers, which ought to be a heckuva lot cheaper to replace than that...
Yup, wouldn’t be the first time a dealership tried to charge an owner for a warranty repair, happens all the time.
 

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Have the struts done anywhere else. They wear out with mileage and use. Nothing special about them because the car is electric.

What’s the gearbox? The “transmission”?
 

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Yup, wouldn’t be the first time a dealership tried to charge an owner for a warranty repair, happens all the time.
I don't think that it is nearly as common as you say. State laws require that manufacturers reimburse dealers for warranty work at retail rates. If anything, they want to leave more money in the customer's pocket to upsell other things.
 

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I don't think that it is nearly as common as you say. State laws require that manufacturers reimburse dealers for warranty work at retail rates. If anything, they want to leave more money in the customer's pocket to upsell other things.
I’ve had to fight with a dealership more than once to get warranty repairs covered, one time I needed to bring in the manufacturer’s rep to overrule the dealership. I’m sure that this was probably just bad luck on my part, but a dealer gets paid a lot more from a customer for a repair than they get reimbursed by the manufacturer.

As always, there are honest dealerships, and not-so-honest dealerships. Some will go to bat for a customer to assist in getting a warranty repair, and some will not.

For me, this is all past history. My ‘17 Bolt never went back to the dealership in three years for any repairs, warranty or otherwise. Most reliable car I’ve ever had. I now have a ‘20 Bolt, with any luck it will be as bullet-proof as the ‘17.
 

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a dealer gets paid a lot more from a customer for a repair than they get reimbursed by the manufacturer.
This is simply not true. By law the manufacturer must pay the retail rate for warranty work (at least in every state that I am familiar with). This doesn't necessarily mean that the rate the dealership charges the public is the same as their reimbursement rate, but they are generally not too far apart. If they are then it's the dealership's fault. If they don't feel like doing their own legwork, there are several companies out there that they can hire to do market studies and negotiate the retail rate.

I've never heard of a situation in which the manufacturer is advocating for a repair to be covered under warranty whereas the dealership is against it. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but if I were you I would find a different dealership since that is practically unheard of. Usually it's the dealership fighting with the manufacturer to have the work covered under warranty.

What probably happened is that the dealership had a good faith belief that the repair would not be covered under warranty and that they exhausted their remedies. When you escalated it with the manufacturer, it got the manufacturer's attention.. Manufacturers are used to saying no to the dealerships, but they don't want customer bad mouthing them on Facebook etc.
 

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And I would assume that "struts" means the shock absorbers, which ought to be a heckuva lot cheaper to replace than that...
I thought he only posted the total estimate which was all inclusive? Not sure how you determined the strut cost. I wouldn't be surprised at city driving with those miles to need new struts, anyone replace them yet? I'd like to know what what they paid.
 

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This is simply not true. By law the manufacturer must pay the retail rate for warranty work (at least in every state that I am familiar with). This doesn't necessarily mean that the rate the dealership charges the public is the same as their reimbursement rate, but they are generally not too far apart. If they are then it's the dealership's fault.
But isn't it sometimes the case that the hours per job specified by the manufacturer for warranty reimbursement are different from what the dealer charges or the mechanics actually take? If the manufacturer's hours are higher, then the dealer / mechanics will want it to be a warranty repair. But if the manufacturer's hours are lower, then the dealer / mechanics will want it to be a customer-pay repair.
 

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But isn't it sometimes the case that the hours per job specified by the manufacturer for warranty reimbursement are different from what the dealer charges or the mechanics actually take? If the manufacturer's hours are higher, then the dealer / mechanics will want it to be a warranty repair. But if the manufacturer's hours are lower, then the dealer / mechanics will want it to be a customer-pay repair.
Retail rate is supposed to be retail rate.

Mechanics are often paid on a “flat rate” or “job rate” - which means that they get paid the number of hours that the job should take, whether it takes them more or less. A motivated mechanic can do very well under this type of pay plan.
 

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I thought he only posted the total estimate which was all inclusive? Not sure how you determined the strut cost.
I didn't. My point was that the one thing was covered by warranty and the other was cheap, so he shouldn't worry about paying anything close to the cost that was quoted.
 

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This is simply not true. By law the manufacturer must pay the retail rate for warranty work (at least in every state that I am familiar with). This doesn't necessarily mean that the rate the dealership charges the public is the same as their reimbursement rate, but they are generally not too far apart. If they are then it's the dealership's fault. If they don't feel like doing their own legwork, there are several companies out there that they can hire to do market studies and negotiate the retail rate.

I've never heard of a situation in which the manufacturer is advocating for a repair to be covered under warranty whereas the dealership is against it. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but if I were you I would find a different dealership since that is practically unheard of. Usually it's the dealership fighting with the manufacturer to have the work covered under warranty.

What probably happened is that the dealership had a good faith belief that the repair would not be covered under warranty and that they exhausted their remedies. When you escalated it with the manufacturer, it got the manufacturer's attention.. Manufacturers are used to saying no to the dealerships, but they don't want customer bad mouthing them on Facebook etc.
I stand by my earlier comments.
 

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Hummm.. are we starting to see components that can't be expected to make it to 100K? Chevy has never been know for the durability of their modern cars. It would be ironic if the main battery turned out to be the longest lasting component of the Bolt..
 

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Hummm.. are we starting to see components that can't be expected to make it to 100K? Chevy has never been know for the durability of their modern cars. It would be ironic if the main battery turned out to be the longest lasting component of the Bolt..
Hummm.... does one post make a trend?
 

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This is simply not true. By law the manufacturer must pay the retail rate for warranty work (at least in every state that I am familiar with). This doesn't necessarily mean that the rate the dealership charges the public is the same as their reimbursement rate, but they are generally not too far apart. If they are then it's the dealership's fault. If they don't feel like doing their own legwork, there are several companies out there that they can hire to do market studies and negotiate the retail rate.

I've never heard of a situation in which the manufacturer is advocating for a repair to be covered under warranty whereas the dealership is against it. I'm not saying it didn't happen, but if I were you I would find a different dealership since that is practically unheard of. Usually it's the dealership fighting with the manufacturer to have the work covered under warranty.

What probably happened is that the dealership had a good faith belief that the repair would not be covered under warranty and that they exhausted their remedies. When you escalated it with the manufacturer, it got the manufacturer's attention.. Manufacturers are used to saying no to the dealerships, but they don't want customer bad mouthing them on Facebook etc.
It simply IS true. Dealerships charge the customer a markup on parts that they get from the manufacturer for non-warranty repairs, a lot of the profit in a repair comes from the mark up on parts. On a warranty repair the dealership is not purchasing a part from GM and then selling it back to GM with a markup in order to do the warranty repair... they just get the part for free and charge GM for the labor.

Keith
 
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