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I've enjoyed lurking before leasing a new '19 Bolt EV 10 days ago. Made the deal without needing to go to the dealer (LA). They even delivered the vehicle to me (45 min away).

The next day with a total of 75 miles on the vehicle, after driving with more than 50% charge for 30 minutes I arrived at my destination and was unable to shift to Reverse, getting the "Conditions are not right to shift" message that others have gotten. After toggling on and off multiple times and talking to (useless) Onstar I tried to turn the car off and return 15 minutes later. That worked and the vehicle drove again, but with Get Engine Service Soon light now on.

We did a couple more local errands. On our way back home all of a sudden we got the "Loss of Propulsion" message and the car no longer would accelerate when pressing on the gas pedal. I was able to get the side of the road. After 15 minutes of toggling on/off I was able to get the car to turn on and shift again. In a stroke of luck, we happened to literally be across the street from another Chevy dealership. However, it being Sunday their service department was closed.

Fast forward through some annoyances with the speed and communications with the service department they indicated that they found issues in the power terminal and most likely needed to replace the Transmission, Power Inverter, and Engine Harness. o_O Ridiculous for a new vehicle with under 100 miles on it!

Been heavily debating if we should push for GM to buyback this vehicle or consider it to be in strong shape once these parts are replaced. It was already scary enough for my pregnant wife and mother-in-law, let alone thinking what could have happened if we were driving at higher speeds or on the freeway. Welcome the community's feedback on how they would feel to continue forward with this vehicle given it needed such immediate overhauls.

If we do pursue buyback from Chevy it should be clean as we put $0 down $0 Due at Signing. However, the original dealer now saying that they made a mistake with the original deal that we got and that if we lease a new Bolt it would be another $2500 over the lease-term. Thinking that ideal scenario would be to get Chevy to take this vehicle back and have dealer give us the same deal on a new Bolt.

Any thoughts on how to push the dealer or Chevy Corporate?
 

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Sorry for your problems. Just know those are the rare exception. Most here will testify the Bolt is the most trouble-free, maintenance-free vehicle they've ever owned.

Also, while it is scant comfort, I know owners of German luxury sedans costing three times a Bolt who have had similar gremlins in their new cars.

As to advice; it's unknowable. Any of us offering an opinion is just making a WAG. The dealer service might find and fix this problem and you'd be good to go forever after. OTOH, if they gave you a new Bolt at the same deal, it might present the same problem the day after.

jack vines
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Currently, pursuing both of the above options. Other curveball is that the dealer I got the car from is not the dealer that I am getting service from. So the service dealer has initially balked at covering my gas.

I'm still high on the Bolt as a vehicle and am excited to have one. However, this forum has also documented the lack of EV repair experts out there. So makes me worried if it will come back in better shape or not. Also true that a new vehicle could have a similar issue and we wouldn't know either until it strikes.
 

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Wow, when I get a loaner, I am told to return it with the same level of gas that I drove it out the door with, is this now not how that is done? Does it say in the clause of getting a courtesy car that the gas is gratis? I do know that the courtesy car is not guaranteed to be an EV, they actually spell that out now due to some entitlement issues they ran into.
 

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Sounds like a problem with the shifter, another thread talks about such a recall starting in Korea. My new Bolt was made Apr 2019 so I hope this recall begins in the USA real soon so I can get the issue fixed before I experience it. I had wanted to try a road trip with the Bolt, now I think I'll hold off.

 

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Sorry to hear about your Bolt. Scary at first, I think you should give the service department an attempt to repair it. If they get it running right you will love this car. I bought (2) 2019 Bolts this year, and recently returned from a 1200 mile trip with no issues at all.

Best of luck!
 

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Been heavily debating if we should push for GM to buyback this vehicle or consider it to be in strong shape once these parts are replaced. It was already scary enough for my pregnant wife and mother-in-law, let alone thinking what could have happened if we were driving at higher speeds or on the freeway. Welcome the community's feedback on how they would feel to continue forward with this vehicle given it needed such immediate overhauls.

Any thoughts on how to push the dealer or Chevy Corporate?
I'm one of the owners who's had issues and an investigation is currently ongoing into the buyback of my 2017 Bolt. This has come after the car, which we lease, has been in and out of the dealership regularly over the past 4 months, being out of service for over 45 days in that time span. Service has been very poor and the knowledge of EV technology clearly lacking.

Frankly I'm not even excited at the concept of a buyback of my car. It's two years into the lease and only has 8900 miles (due in part to the fact that our car was sitting at the dealership depriving us accruing heavy miles during Memorial day and Labor day weekend road trips) so I feel like we're going to get hosed with their offer. Plus I like my Bolt and the vehicles I'm interested in replacing it with are a year away. The Bolt is also the only Chevy I'll buy.

On the buyback, for me the equation is simple, give me an amazing buyback offer and I'm 95% sure to get a new Bolt right now. However, give me a poor buyback offer and I'll decline it, keep the current car while pursuing that they reimburse the lease payments for the time we lost because it was in service, and once I return the car I'm 95% sure I will never be a GM client again.

My two cents is this, while your experience is (very) unpleasant, I would not be pursuing a buyback this soon. Chances are, once it's been repaired, you'll be good to go and better than new. If the problem returns, or new problems come out of the repairs, then you go for the buyback.
 

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I had a similar issue recently.

I was doing 70 MPH on freeway then low battery warning came up. I thought it was an error because my battery was 50% full, then I saw red battery sign on dashboard, looked like 12v battery. I had the same warning (Conditions are not right to shift), then all of sudden it asked to stop my car immediately; my 2017 Chevy Bolt (recently bought, used) was dying on freeway due to dead 12v battery. Few more "dramatic details" in between, but I should create a separate post to share.

Long story short, we took it to the dealership, they called GM engineers with codes they have gotten from logs, and concluded that it was a bad 12v battery. I was suspecting that it was the charging-system of 12v battery, but if it happens again, it's on GM, not me. I'll take it back for repair; I love my Bolt so much that I'm willing to give few more tries before I give up. (This is my 3rd EV in last 4 years btw)

I also heard that EVs parked without charger connected for weeks and months could damage the 12v battery. Of course dealerships wouldn't have such detailed information that they may have damaged your 12v battery even before selling it to you.
 

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If you are in a lease, is a buyback simply they just let you out of the lease early as far as you are concerned, and the leasing company and GM work it out among themselves? I have a friend who bought a Camaro, had a bank loan. He got a buyback, car caught on fire though he was doing burnouts earlier. A point he didn't mention to the fire department who put the car out. GM paid off his loan in full, reimbursed him for title, registration, taxes. Reimbursed him for his down payment and then gave him $5000 cash and another $5000 in a credit towards a GM product. With a lease, it seems the driver is in the middle between GM and the company that owns the car. How does that work?
 

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I also heard that EVs parked without charger connected for weeks and months could damage the 12v battery. Of course dealerships wouldn't have such detailed information that they may have damaged your 12v battery even before selling it to you.
Wow, if the 12v battery is such a weak point, should we be buying 12v adapters that shows the battery voltage?
 

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Wow, if the 12v battery is such a weak point, should we be buying 12v adapters that shows the battery voltage?
Yep thats a good idea, I did that with an earlier EV I leased for 3 years since the 12v battery is always the weak link here. I got a small cheap device that plugs in the 12v accessory port and displays the voltage, now there are fancier ones that also provide USB port(s) and display voltage, current, temp. I also got a portable lithium-ion 12v jump starter unit to keep in the car for emergencies, though I also have a 12v battery charger in my garage.

I also practiced if the 12v battery was too low and the car wouldn't do anything even windows/door locks, etc. to use the backup manual key to open the driver side door so I could get inside to get the jump starter.

I was reading the Tesla model 3 PDF user manual recently and discovered they don't have a manual backup key if your 12v battery died and one guy posted in a forum he couldn't get into the car since it locked all the doors before the battery died and had no way to unlock the doors. They do have a way to get into the front area though and hook up a jumper cables to the 12v battery input - that would work in your garage with an external 12v battery jumper, but wouldn't let you get inside the car to get a jumper device stored inside. So I don't like that limitation on the Teslas compared to other EVs like the Bolt, etc that have a backup manual doorkey in the FOB.
 

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I was reading the Tesla model 3 PDF user manual recently and discovered they don't have a manual backup key if your 12v battery died and one guy posted in a forum he couldn't get into the car since it locked all the doors before the battery died and had no way to unlock the doors. They do have a way to get into the front area though and hook up a jumper cables to the 12v battery input - that would work in your garage with an external 12v battery jumper, but wouldn't let you get inside the car to get a jumper device stored inside. So I don't like that limitation on the Teslas compared to other EVs like the Bolt, etc that have a backup manual doorkey in the FOB.
Um... then you should just store the battery jumper in the "frunk"...
 

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Um... then you should just store the battery jumper in the "frunk"...
Unfortunately the only way to unlock the "frunk" on the Tesla with the 12v battery dead is to pull out from the tow cover a couple secret wires and hook up the 12v jumper lines to that. But if thats inside the "frunk" you can't get at it. You need a 12v power source outside the car to get in there too. All because they don't have a backup mechanical key and door lock that all the other EVs have.
 

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I also practiced if the 12v battery was too low and the car wouldn't do anything even windows/door locks, etc. to use the backup manual key to open the driver side door so I could get inside to get the jump starter.
Perhaps it is best to turn the car on when charging with the infotainment turned off at least 1 day a week? This way, the 12v battery has more time getting charged.
 

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I ended up also getting a cheap 12v battery trickle charger to always use in the garage when the car is sitting around for more than a day. Didn't want to take any chances...
 

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It's common for 12v batteries to be abused on dealer lots. They have jumper batteries on wheels just for the purpose of starting the vehicles that run their 12v batteries flat while on the lot. Was just told yesterday that the 2 year old Mazda has a weak battery. No doubt it was abused before it reached my care.
 

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Wow, when I get a loaner, I am told to return it with the same level of gas that I drove it out the door with, is this now not how that is done? Does it say in the clause of getting a courtesy car that the gas is gratis? I do know that the courtesy car is not guaranteed to be an EV, they actually spell that out now due to some entitlement issues they ran into.
When I took the Bolt in for service recently we were given a Malibu. The person in charge of loaners said that since we have a Bolt, we could bring the Malibu back empty (it was full when we took it out).
 

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When I took the Bolt in for service recently we were given a Malibu. The person in charge of loaners said that since we have a Bolt, we could bring the Malibu back empty (it was full when we took it out).
Fair enough, I don't think you'll find that universal or a policy in writing for EV owners. The 'concern' of getting an ICE while an EV is in the shop and then bitching about paying for the gas you use which has actually been brought up more than a few times here in this forum is effed up. I'll leave it at that.
 
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