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Discussion Starter #1
Today's paper here had a piece about Colorado moving towards a tax on mileage (instead of gasoline tax) for road maintenance and infrastructure. It does seem like a fairer way to do it, though if it happens it will remove a nice financial incentive for EV users. The state is trying to figure out how to tax people's mileage without invading their privacy, how to deal with out-of-staters driving into or through, etc. There is already an annual $50/year tax here on EV users. One somewhat odd idea is to have people submit a photo of their odometer reading annually. Seems like a less than ideal solution.

Do any other states have such a mileage tax in place? If so, how do they do it. I am sure other states are thinking about it.
 

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Fuel tax, EV tax, and mileage tax all seem just about equally bad to me. Infrastructure is needed by all regardless if they directly use it or not, just like people benefit from a police force even if they don't call in a burglary. For this reason, infrastructure should be budgeted just like all other services deemed necessary, and paid for by general tax revenue either from income tax or sales tax. Inventing new ways to tax people just adds administrative cost and complexity.

I know this doesn't answer the OP, but I'm throwing this idea out there to get people thinking about how unacceptable new forms of taxation are. Government should be as small as possible.
 

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SHHHhhh. Quiet please. My jurisdication ridiculously taxes the stuff at the pump. Meanwhile they stretched the financing of the power grid out to a couple of more generations from me, in order to give me an 8% rebate on my hydro bill. Now there's talk about giving a break for EV charging. And there's no fees for EV's. In fact, with my green license plate I can boogey down the HOV lane single-occupant no problem.

Sure don't need examples of US states who bleed the EV consumer ! Please and thank-you.
 

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I would say self reported mileage with perhaps a penalty associated with non-renewed registration, to capture unreported out of state vehicle sales. Mileage tax can always be captured and "trued up" on in-state sales. Mileage tax tables associated with GVWR is the fairest way to impose such a tax I think, as the lions share of road wear is still going to be done by heavy trucking.
 

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Oregon passed a sliding scale registration fee structure based on EPA MPG ratings - the more efficient your car, the more you pay (to make up for what you don't pay at the pump).
EV's are at the top of the list with the highest add-on fee ($110/yr), but get an exemption until 2020.
 

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Oregon passed a sliding scale registration fee structure based on EPA MPG ratings - the more efficient your car, the more you pay (to make up for what you don't pay at the pump).
EV's are at the top of the list with the highest add-on fee ($110/yr), but get an exemption until 2020.
Seems unfair to penalize those with fuel-efficient vehicles!
 

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why? is a mile driven in an EV less wear on the road than a mile driven with an ICE?
One could argue that a 3,500 pound Bolt would be paying the same tax as a 5,900 pound Ford F150 truck, or a 80,000 pound loaded semi trailer, but the damage done to the infrastructure would not be the same.
 

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Do any other states have such a mileage tax in place? If so, how do they do it. I am sure other states are thinking about it.

In Texas, we used to have independent processes for car inspection and registration. Last year it became mandatory for the inspection to be complete prior to registration. This could have had many reasons (people sliding the inspection a month or so every year like me, or enforcing emission compliance), but I think a primary driver was that the state now has a recording of odometer reading from year-to-year. I am sure that this was placed for a possible conversion to a miles-driven registration fee structure. But currently, the only highways I pay for are the toll roads I drive on.
 

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Odometer reading seems like the most fair way to do it. There are some details that would need to be worked out, but I think it's doable.

Meanwhile, here in Georgia the legislature has become downright hostile toward EV's. They took away the cash incentives and tacked on a whopping $200 per year tax just to register an EV. There is no way $200 equates to what I would have paid in gasoline tax, even though we drive almost 30,000 miles per year.

Plus, for some inexplicable reason, they don't allow EV's to ride free in the new toll lanes. The old toll lanes on I-85 are still free to EV's. But the new ones are not. Go figure.
 

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why? is a mile driven in an EV less wear on the road than a mile driven with an ICE?
Simple -- Because a fuel efficient vehicle is polluting the air a lot less than a gas guzzler. Air quality concerns are one of the major reasons for the push towards EV's
 

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Simple -- Because a fuel efficient vehicle is polluting the air a lot less than a gas guzzler. Air quality concerns are one of the major reasons for the push towards EV's
Not sure air pollution and road building and maintenance are (or should be) linked :confused:

All vehicles that travel on public roadways need to help pay for them. As EV's gain more and more market penetration, is it reasonable that only ICE vehicles continue pay for the roads?
 

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Not sure what the most efficient way to pay for our roads is. I sort of like the gas tax as it is easy to collect VS an increased state tax that would tax folks for roads that only used public transit, walked, or rode bikes. In general I like use tax VS income tax or sales tax as that allows the real cost of things to get lost in the noise too easily

In NY we do have "green tags" for EVs and hybrids to give us reduced tolls, and so far all the public charging I have used has been free.
 

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Plus, for some inexplicable reason, they don't allow EV's to ride free in the new toll lanes. The old toll lanes on I-85 are still free to EV's. But the new ones are not. Go figure.
If you get the AFV plate in Georgia, I think you can apply for a special PeachPass and use the express lanes for free. But you still need the pass. Same appears to be true of the express lanes up I-75.

But back to the main topic: if the purpose of a mileage tax was to fairly pay for road maintenance, then it would be based on the square of the vehicle weight times miles driven. There's no way that my 350lb motorcycle does the same damage to a road that a 80,000lb truck does, even after you account for distributing the weight among more tires. A fuel tax somewhat deals with that concept, since fuel consumed is related to the weight of the vehicle. A straight mileage tax would essentially make light vehicles subsidize the heavy ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
After seeing the comments and many issues, it really does seem best for the population as a whole to pay for roads through a general tax, with perhaps a surtax on especially heavy vehicles. Everybody benefits from infrastructure. But somehow the states are set up to tax the drivers.
 

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If you get the AFV plate in Georgia, I think you can apply for a special PeachPass and use the express lanes for free. But you still need the pass. Same appears to be true of the express lanes up I-75.
I got my AFV plate and my PeachPass. It's only free on the original I-85 lanes. For the new I-75 lanes on the south side, you have to pay.

I was told by a PeachPass employee that they are building some new toll lanes on I-75 on the north side. No word on whether those will be free to EV's.
 

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If you get the AFV plate in Georgia, I think you can apply for a special PeachPass and use the express lanes for free. But you still need the pass. Same appears to be true of the express lanes up I-75.
You may be thinking of the HOV lanes. Those are free to use with one passenger and an AFV plate. No PeachPass required.
 

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General fund taxation allows road users to negatively externalize a public good; the additional cost to taxpayers of extra road use becomes unmitigated in this type of scheme. This is why pigouvian taxes like a GVWR-weighted mileage tax is preferred by most economists where additional use of a public good would otherwise not be reflected in the cost of doing business. Carbon taxation is preferred economically speaking for the same reasons.
 
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