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Now, to be honest, I didn't read all the posts. But, in reading the Title, I knew I had to comment.

On my 2020 Bolt Premiere, and even with an unofficial 0-60 (hilly terrain) and an accidental pee lout, while turning, I'm getting 8+ Mp kWh. :cool: And, I have an Technique Efficiency of over 35% (that was before I discovered using the Regen Braking Paddle, when possible; still gotta get use to it). :cool: :cool:

First, I don't try to setting acceleration records. Just smooth, steady acceleration (only when needed, do I punch it). Also, in approaching a Stop sign/ Red light (adjusting for traffic) and traffic, I start coasting up to 15 seconds before braking.

Though, the Regen Braking Paddle initially slows me down pretty quickly, I think, the overall stopping distance is actually longer than with the conventional brakes (I've had to use the brakes a few times because I felt I was still too fast approaching my stop point.
 

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...On my 2020 Bolt Premiere, and even with an unofficial 0-60 (hilly terrain) and an accidental pee lout, while turning, I'm getting 8+ Mp kWh. :cool: And, I have an Technique Efficiency of over 35%...
While I no longer worry about efficiency on a day-to-day basis, I do find it interesting that the Bolt has several visual cues designed to get drivers to think about efficiency. On the Driver Information Center (dashboard display), several items are always visible: GOM, state of charge (green bars), energy consumption, regenerative braking, and speed- or acceleration-related efficiency (speedometer color changes from green to yellow).

In previous ICE vehicles I've driven, I can show range, fuel economy, etc. - but I can also hide them. The only thing always visible is the fuel gauge, which would be equivalent to the green bars representing SOC.

I wonder what people's experience with the Bolt would be if all of those cues were hidden by default, with only the green bars representing SOC always visible?

Would it reduce range anxiety because we won't think about efficiency during our daily (US average) 29 mile commute? Or would it increase range anxiety because we won't have that immediate feedback from our driving habits, and wonder why we can go 230 miles on a full charge one trip, and only 160 miles on another trip?
 

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I taught my wife to drive a manual in about an hour. She was popping the clutch and killing it continuously. What finally clicked for her was me telling her to take what seems to be an eternity to let out the clutch slowly. Take a ridiculously long time to let the clutch out I told her. She got it the very next attempt...
I feel like exactly the same advice would be great for people who struggle with "L" mode. Start on a quiet road with no traffic, drive at a nice steady speed of, say 30 mph - then very, very slowly let off on the accelerator pedal. Count out like 15 or 20 seconds to go from steady-speed pressure to no pressure at all. You'll find the car slows down and stops very, very smoothly.

There are two misconceptions that I try to jump on every time: one is that the Bolt's regen is "too strong". It is not "too strong", you're just releasing the accelerator pedal "too quickly". If you stomped on the brake as abruptly as you released the accelerator pedal it would be just as jarring, but nobody complains about the brakes being "too powerful". Don't blame a lack of finesse on the car.

The other is that driving in "L" is somehow more or less efficient than driving in "D". Unless you're a very aggressive driver who's always stomping on either the accelerator or brake pedals, "D" and "L" are pretty much identical in terms of efficiency. "D" mode uses regen to brake in exactly the same way as "L" mode does, it just uses a different input to control it. There's a small difference just as the speed drops down to zero, but by that time the energy needed to brake is almost nil anyway.

So go ahead and drive in either mode without worries. The Bolt is a fantastic car either way.
 

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I tired teaching her how to drive a manual transmission it became obvious that she could only pay attention to shifting or keeping the car on the road. For mine and my cars sake I stopped trying to teach her.
I remember my dad trying to teach my mom how to drive a manual transmission. It was not healthy for their marriage, so he stopped.
Trying to teach a family member is like trying to cut their hair or fix their brakes—sure, some people have the required skills to do it, but for others it's probably best if they realize that if it isn't a skill they've honed, things may go disastrously wrong. It's better to pay a professional sometimes.

I suspect that half the problem where some dude is trying to mansplain something technical to their wife or girlfriend is that the teacher doesn't realize that their student doesn't actually give a dāmn about whatever it is, and is basically just there watching the clock waiting for the ordeal to be over.

It's also worth remembering that outside the bubble of the USA, manual transmission cars continue to be dominant. Just about everyone in Europe learns on and drives a manual transmission car. Somehow a variety of “stupid” people of both sexes manage it (and consider automatics something weird and scary).

In other words, it's not that one-pedal driving is difficult or easy. It's that for many people, once they've figured out a way to do a thing that is “good enough”, whether it is how to drive a car or boil an egg, they don't really care about figuring out a whole new “better” way to do it, especially not when it's pushed on them by someone who would never be their choice to teach them anything. If some dude can't get his wife to be as into learning about one-pedal driving as he is, it doesn't mean much about one-pedal driving, and it also doesn't mean much about innate driving abilities of women in general. It might mean something about the teaching abilities and social skills of that particular man, however.
 

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If some dude can't get his wife to be as into learning about...it doesn't mean much about...
Fill in the blanks and it's still true.

I will say for my parents,, they probably would have been fine giving or receiving the exact same driving instructions to or from complete strangers, and in someone else's car. The problem was the baggage...
 

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Trying to teach a family member is like trying to cut their hair or fix their brakes—sure, some people have the required skills to do it, but for others it's probably best if they realize that if it isn't a skill they've honed, things may go disastrously wrong. It's better to pay a professional sometimes.
My wife cuts my hair and I do all brake work around here. I'm wanting to learn how to cut her hair because it costs a lot more for a woman's haircut for some reason.

Maybe I'll learn by cutting my daughters hair.
 

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On my 2020 Bolt Premiere, and even with an unofficial 0-60 (hilly terrain) and an accidental pee lout, while turning, I'm getting 8+ Mp kWh
I am very curious how your are getting 8mi/kWh in your Bolt when about the absolute best anyone else under normal conditions between 5-6mi/kWh. Your GOM at full charge should show well over 400mi of range. Would love to see a photo of that ;)
 

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Re: teaching to drive a manual transmission. My daughter was having a hard time getting a feel for the clutch and synchronizing clutch with gas, etc. So we went to a flat, empty parking lot on a Sunday morning, and I told her to forget about the gas pedal and just get the car rolling with the engine idling, by using the clutch. Of course we started with a few stalls, but we would re-start the car, and she very quickly mastered feathering the clutch to get rolling in first gear with the engine idling. We would just drive back around to the same spot in first gear and repeat. After that, it was much easier to learn to control the accelerator while letting out the clutch.

I guess you could call that a form of one-pedal driving. ;)
 

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Check out Formula E and Formula 1; they both use regenerating braking systems.
My question is: How do they configure the GO and Stop Pedals in E Racers.
1. Similar to a Bolt in D, light regen off the Go and Blended Brakes on the Stop pedal.
2. Similar to a Bolt in L, max regen off the Go Pedal, then move to the Stop pedal when more is braking is needed?
3. Similar to Tesla, max regen off the Go Pedal, then move to the Stop pedal, which is always just friction brakes.

In a racing situation max and close to max braking is used all the time.
I would think you don't want max regen brake with the Go Pedal and then switch to the Stop Pedal every time.
I would think you'd want Dedicated Go and Stop Pedals and hopefully they have decent Blended Brakes, like the Bolt.

This is just my opinion. I'd like to see read about how the race cars are actually configured. Different teams may do it differently.

I know when I go out on the track in an E Racer I would prefer conventional functioning of the Pedal, similar to the Bolt in D. :cool:
 

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I learned the mastery of 3 pedal driving with 2 feet aka heel toe as a result of a rotary with a broken corner seal that would only run above 1500rpm. Nothing like sitting at a stop light with your engine revved to 1500 RPM just to keep it going.
 

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Trying to teach a family member is like trying to cut their hair or fix their brakes—sure, some people have the required skills to do it, but for others it's probably best if they realize that if it isn't a skill they've honed, things may go disastrously wrong. It's better to pay a professional sometimes.

I suspect that half the problem where some dude is trying to mansplain something technical to their wife or girlfriend is that the teacher doesn't realize that their student doesn't actually give a dāmn about whatever it is, and is basically just there watching the clock waiting for the ordeal to be over.

It's also worth remembering that outside the bubble of the USA, manual transmission cars continue to be dominant. Just about everyone in Europe learns on and drives a manual transmission car. Somehow a variety of “stupid” people of both sexes manage it (and consider automatics something weird and scary).

In other words, it's not that one-pedal driving is difficult or easy. It's that for many people, once they've figured out a way to do a thing that is “good enough”, whether it is how to drive a car or boil an egg, they don't really care about figuring out a whole new “better” way to do it, especially not when it's pushed on them by someone who would never be their choice to teach them anything. If some dude can't get his wife to be as into learning about one-pedal driving as he is, it doesn't mean much about one-pedal driving, and it also doesn't mean much about innate driving abilities of women in general. It might mean something about the teaching abilities and social skills of that particular man, however.
I feel like I just read the script for a new Gillette Toxic Masculinity commercial 🤮...that is if they could even make one again, now that masculinity and femininity don't exist anymore. Not good for zou or ze.
 

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My question is: How do they configure the GO and Stop Pedals in E Racers.
1. Similar to a Bolt in D, light regen off the Go and Blended Brakes on the Stop pedal.
2. Similar to a Bolt in L, max regen off the Go Pedal, then move to the Stop pedal when more is braking is needed?
3. Similar to Tesla, max regen off the Go Pedal, then move to the Stop pedal, which is always just friction brakes.

In a racing situation max and close to max braking is used all the time.
I would think you don't want max regen brake with the Go Pedal and then switch to the Stop Pedal every time.
I would think you'd want Dedicated Go and Stop Pedals and hopefully they have decent Blended Brakes, like the Bolt.

This is just my opinion. I'd like to see read about how the race cars are actually configured. Different teams may do it differently.

I know when I go out on the track in an E Racer I would prefer conventional functioning of the Pedal, similar to the Bolt in D. :cool:
1. Race drivers are rarely coasting...no need for D mode
2. more likely, but also more complicated. These are not 1950's race cars where it is all seat of the pants and guts, they are very computerized. Likely multiple regens for different speeds and g-forces...maybe even customized to each race course.
3. I would guess they are actually similar to the Bolt in L....strong but not full regen when off the throttle, full regen available with a paddle, but with friction brakes only.

Think how much faster they can drive/how much deeper into the corners they can go fast, if they aren't as worried about overheating their friction brakes. Easier to design effective cooling for the motor and battery than the brakes
 

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I learned the mastery of 3 pedal driving with 2 feet aka heel toe as a result of a rotary with a broken corner seal that would only run above 1500rpm. Nothing like sitting at a stop light with your engine revved to 1500 RPM just to keep it going.
I owned a NA RX-7 in the past, and even with that rotary in perfect shape it seemed like it wasn't really running below 1500rpm. Felt like it had 0.00001 ft/lbs of torque until about 4000rpm! :rolleyes: But was light and fun if you kept the revs up on a twisty road
 

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.....Likely multiple regens for different speeds and g-forces...maybe even customized to each race course.
3. I would guess they are actually similar to the Bolt in L....strong but not full regen when off the throttle, full regen available with a paddle, but with friction brakes only....
I kind of agree, but it would be interesting to read about how they are configured and if some teams do it differently.
I'm sure they don't want weird transitions from regen to friction.
 

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I feel like exactly the same advice would be great for people who struggle with "L" mode. Start on a quiet road with no traffic, drive at a nice steady speed of, say 30 mph - then very, very slowly let off on the accelerator pedal. Count out like 15 or 20 seconds to go from steady-speed pressure to no pressure at all. You'll find the car slows down and stops very, very smoothly.

There are two misconceptions that I try to jump on every time: one is that the Bolt's regen is "too strong". It is not "too strong", you're just releasing the accelerator pedal "too quickly". If you stomped on the brake as abruptly as you released the accelerator pedal it would be just as jarring, but nobody complains about the brakes being "too powerful". Don't blame a lack of finesse on the car.

The other is that driving in "L" is somehow more or less efficient than driving in "D". Unless you're a very aggressive driver who's always stomping on either the accelerator or brake pedals, "D" and "L" are pretty much identical in terms of efficiency. "D" mode uses regen to brake in exactly the same way as "L" mode does, it just uses a different input to control it. There's a small difference just as the speed drops down to zero, but by that time the energy needed to brake is almost nil anyway.

So go ahead and drive in either mode without worries. The Bolt is a fantastic car either way.
SN,
I did a little experiment on driving in L at highway speeds versus D... L ate up more "juice" not sure why, but I only use L for in town or below 45... does this make sense?
 

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I kind of agree, but it would be interesting to read about how they are configured and if some teams do it differently.
I'm sure they don't want weird transitions from regen to friction.
I'd be interested too...I guarantee they have figured out how to make it smooth. Have you ever followed the MotoGP? They have some pretty heavy computerized controls on the braking and engine as they are both stronger than the tires can handle and they race on the very edge all the time. Have seen more than once that if the software/ECU glitches, they just crash within a curve or two.
 

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..I did a little experiment on driving in L at highway speeds versus D... L ate up more "juice" not sure why, ...
Tests like this should be round trips in the same temp and wind speed and direction.
It's hard to get identical results on longer tests.
With the cruise set at highway speed D or L should not matter one bit.
 
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