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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello Everyone!
:)

Purchased 2020 Bolt with 000,006mi in May with gobs of incentives that made it too good a deal to pass.

Still feel that way. Called the dealer and let the sales manager know my expectation as a loyal Bolt customer of getting one of the first replacement batteries available and not having to wait while those yet unsold or returned to GM dealer lots get one first.

He said it is not up to the dealers and they know no more than anyone else so avoid believing anything anyone else says.

A few days after purchase began feeling the pain of a bruise just below right knee where leg had been resting on cup holder. Then became aware of sore muscle down to ankle which seemed to be caused by twisting the right leg to get foot to throttle pedal.

Contacted dealer about removing the vestigial center console because by then had become annoyed with console storage box interfering with both passenger and driver elbows.

Began driving with lid open so shoulder and arm are less restricted.
Now, was planning on removing the lid.

Became aware pedal assembly is located too far to the right side of the steering wheel.

Noticed the brake pedal pad has a flange on the right side which could be to prevent driver's right foot from inadvertantly resting on the throttle pedal yet behind the brake pedal.

Without the guard things could get disasterous really quick.

Noticed the center console is sculpted out to allow the driver's foot to get to the throttle pedal.

Determined to fix issue or trade the car, well before the current battery issues.

Purchased replacement pedal assembly from dealer.

Modified brake pedal by cutting it and inserting a fabricated steel plate, moving it left about 2.5in.

Made a 2.5in wider throttle pedal cover using 1/4in +/- aluminum plate, (shaped on anvil and polished with 80grit on belt sander), then drilled press-fit holes and set furniture pins in cover to provide grip, (bent the pins over and epoxied them to back of cover), then secured to pedal with two 1/4x20 bolts.

Dealer installed one morning a few days later and it was back in garage in less than half-day.

No more twisted leg. No more bruise on knee. No more sore muscle.

Leg goes straight from hip to throttle pedal.

Still have the perfectly good original pedal set in case someone sometime wants replace it with the stock unit.

Otherwise, was not too difficult for a certified welding-capable DIYer.
Was easier to let the dealer install it than mess with it myself.

Before the switch was made the service manager looked at the modified assembly and said, "You should work for GM."

Whew. Glad that saga is over.

Really like the Bolt.
(mostly, sort of, even still)

In the past owned several Italian cars, Alfas and Fiats, and came to understand the basis of their production philosophy is to make and sell enough production cars to pay for the salon art designs and all-out race cars they produce to prove they are ahead of the wave.

Once a design is a big hit, they tell engineers to figure out how to install a drivetrain, and once that is crammed in they send the cobbled up forged-aluminum mechanical nightmare to the upholstery shop and hope they can figure out how to seat at least two occupants regardless of comfort or ergonomics.

The Bolt's pedal assembly location, up until the 22s anyway, is not the car's only evidence of groupthink GM managers apparently taking their cues from styists in Milano, jmo.

Bolts are way ahead for sure.
Looking forward the 24s.
Not so sure of getting there with the 2020.
:)

Pic1 - Finished modified pedal assembly
Pic2 - Side view showing brake pedal alignment maintained
Pic3 - Throttle pedal cover attachment
Pic4 - Installed assembly
Pic5 - Installed assembly
Pic6 - Stock assembly

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I'll have to pay more attention to the relationship of leg to one-pedal, but haven't noticed the pains OP mentions. I use cruise on the highway and local trips are short enough not to make it painful.

Do you brake with your left foot? That brake pedal would be way too far over for me.
Brake, what? We often drive a week without using the brake pedal; good to know it's there in an emergency, but just isn't a thing we use often.

jack vines
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Ninety-five percent one pedal regen mode driver and do use left foot for brake on all cars except with manual transmissions.

However, ergonomics is engineering and in this context refers to geometric alignment and not a matter of opinion.

The right leg goes directly to the throttle pedal and the left leg typically rests to the left of the brake pedal which is now more in alignment with the left hip, pretty much at least in my case, and presents no discomfort or difficulty at all when using the brake.

Both brake and throttle pedals are where they should be, jmo.
:)

Both were moved left or expanded the same distance, so right foot motion from throttle to brake is made with greater, not less, convenience.

Try this: sit in car, close your eyes, relax in the seat with your feet back away from the pedals. Find where it seems your hips are centered and your back is settled evenly against the backrest. Place your hands on the wheel and without looking, extend your right leg forward toward the pedal assembly until your foot touches a pedal. Now open your eyes.

With the stock assembly, my right foot would rest on the right side half of the brake pedal.

The modification moves the pedals over so instead my right foot extends to the left side of the throttle pedal, where the black furniture buttons are located.

Appreciate the comments btw
:)
 

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Ninety-five percent one pedal regen mode driver and do use left foot for brake on all cars except with manual transmissions.

However, ergonomics is engineering and in this context refers to geometric alignment and not a matter of opinion.

The right leg goes directly to the throttle pedal and the left leg typically rests to the left of the brake pedal which is now more in alignment with the left hip, pretty much at least in my case, and presents no discomfort or difficulty at all when using the brake.

Both brake and throttle pedals are where they should be, jmo.
:)

Both were moved left or expanded the same distance, so right foot motion from throttle to brake is made with greater, not less, convenience.

Try this: sit in car, close your eyes, relax in the seat with your feet back away from the pedals. Find where it seems your hips are centered and your back is settled evenly against the backrest. Place your hands on the wheel and without looking, extend your right leg forward toward the pedal assembly until your foot touches a pedal. Now open your eyes.

With the stock assembly, my right foot would rest on the right side half of the brake pedal.

The modification moves the pedals over so instead my right foot extends to the left side of the throttle pedal, where the black furniture buttons are located.

Appreciate the comments btw
:)
My right foot rests against the center console. It's actually uncomfortable for me to have it in the position it sounds like you do. I don't think brake pedals are typically on the left side of the steering wheel in any vehicle, but I'm also not a left-foot brake user. Most of my miles are on manual transmission cars and I'd be pretty hard pressed to heel-toe your setup if there was a clutch pedal too.

I don't know of any adjustable pedal systems that will even let you move the pedal locations laterally, only fore-aft.
 

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I can see this being a huge improvement if you only left foot brake, but I would find it uncomfortable for right foot braking. It looks like your right leg will cross the centerline in order to be centered on the brake pedal. Since the brake pedal requires significantly more force to operate in an emergency situation than the accelerator, it makes sense to me that it's position is optimized ergonomically first (for most people that's the right leg). I'm happy with the original configuration, but could see modifying the brake pedal to be extra wide for left foot braking. Good job though, always nice to see people's customizations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Have any of you noticed the seat is not quite square to the steering wheel?
Perhaps it is only my seat, but it definitely points slightly to the left.
SO, the steering wheel is already to the right of where my butt is pointing.

From there, now, my leg when relaxed and resting on the seat is straight with the knee slightly bent and my heal resting comfortably between the throttle and brake pedals.
Before, not.

It is still easy without lifting my foot to pivot off the heal to reach either the throttle or brake pedals.
I don't think about it any more.
Before it was a constant annoyance.

The throttle and brake pedals are exactly the same distance apart as stock.
The brake pedal remains mostly to the right of the steering column.

Hope this helps
:)
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OP, are you aware that the steering wheel is telescoping? You can set the steering wheel further back so that you can then set the seat further back so you don't bend your knee too much and hit things. I couldn't come close to hitting my knee on anything. Are you exceptionally tall?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes thanks for tip.
Already aware of steering column options.
6ft-1in tall which I am sure is significant to this issue.
This is not a car that I fit in well as by the time my legs are comfortable the steering wheel is too far away even when fully out.
But that is not so much an issue as was having to twist my leg into a pretzel to get and keep it on the throttle pedal.

Thanks for many comments
:)
 
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