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To understand today’s electric vehicle revolution, what people think of it and how likely they are to purchase and EV, Dalia Research has conducted a survey of 43,034 people across 52 countries between December 5, 2016 and February 2, 2017.

According to their global survey, around 40% of car buyers are considering an electric vehicle as their next mode of transportation. In the U.S. and Canada alone, 31% of buyers will likely switch their diesel or petrol-powered cars for an electric one in the next five years. Other countries saw a rise in this figure as well with Mexico at 39%, China at 58% and Thailand sits at the top with 66% of the people surveyed responding positively to the prospects of owning a future EV.

Also of note are the brands most well known for their electric offering, which unsurprisingly is led by Tesla followed by Toyota and Smart. This seems to be the case for both the U.S. and Canada, though there were other options on the survey including BMW, Audi, Peugeot, Citroen, Fiat, Honda, Chevrolet, etc.

For the general buyer, this data shows us the direction in which the automotive market is shifting and raise our expectation for more options later down the road. What automakers can see from it is just what the potential EV buyer values and the average price people are willing to pay for one.
 

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I figured this would happen since Tesla for one shifted perception to that EV's can be cool, they don't need to be boring. Then of course there's the Chevy's of the world stepping up to the plate. But Tesla's seem to be known to everyone... even toddlers.
 

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The national advertising campaign for the Chevy Bolt seems almost nonexistent. It makes me wonder if GM is really interested. I was at a stop light the other day in Berkeley and a woman two lanes over in a Prius yelled how do you like your Bolt? We are thinking it will be our next car. But in general, I don't think a large percentage of the public have much of an idea what it is or how well it works.
I agree, almost everyone knows something about Teslas.
Of course, the Bolt is still expensive compared to ICE's and not as revolutionary as going from a horse and buggy to a automobile, which apparently happened in a short 10 year period. Within three or four years, there will be many BEV's to choose from and maybe not that big a market. Time will tell.
 

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GM isn't going to rollout a national advertising campaign until the Bolt is actually available nationwide, which will be next month. And more than likely, they will wait until September or October when inventory levels are sufficiently large enough in type entire nation to make it worthwhile.

It took the Prius 4 years and two different model generations to become a best-seller. Hopefully it won't take the Bolt quite as long...
 

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Chevy will need to do more marketing before Tesla's model 3 comes out or else people will always be comparing the two and their advertising campaigns. Isn't GM sitting on 111 days of inventory for the Bolt? Is that not enough for them to be a bit more aggressive in their marketing tactics?
 

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I spent this last weekend house boating on Lake Shasta with a large group of fellow watercraft enthusiasts. When we were all sitting around shooting the breeze, the subject of electric cars came up. Most were aware of what's going on with EVs and at least 50% of the group was of the opinion that electric cars "just aren't there yet". Everyone agreed that they would like an electric car, but many only when it could exactly replicate the performance of their current gas cars, meaning recharge in the same amount of time and go the same distance.

When you press people that have a dim view of EVs about their actual daily driving needs, you can point out that the Bolt will serve them just fine with no need for fast recharge times. Most people's daily driving is well inside the Bolt's range. However the "sometimes I like to visit my friend in LA" kind of argument always comes up. To this there is nothing to say because "have a second car" is not acceptable, "rent a gas car" is not acceptable and "find charging stations and take 45 minute breaks" isn't acceptable.

For a large portion of Americans they will never buy a BEV until either it exactly does what their gas car does, or they become dirt cheap so they believe they can afford the extra car. Still there is another portion of Americans that are receptive to the idea when you tell them the benefits. The biggest obstacle is still cost for them. Some predict that cost parity may come as soon as 2022, so that may be a tipping point.

I really wish some of these kinds of articles would stop calling it an "electric car revolution". It is clearly not a revolution when they struggle to make 2% of the total vehicle sales. It is however an evolution and that is the honest way to think about it. Slow and steady change to the next technology.
 

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We've been towing the boat with our 2015 Honda Pilot recently so overall MPG is down a bit- when I filled it up yesterday it's range was calculated at 339mi.
My Bolt showed 300mi on the high end of the GOM yesterday after a full recharge.

We're getting there folks....... :D
 

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When you press people that have a dim view of EVs about their actual daily driving needs, you can point out that the Bolt will serve them just fine with no need for fast recharge times. Most people's daily driving is well inside the Bolt's range. However the "sometimes I like to visit my friend in LA" kind of argument always comes up. To this there is nothing to say because "have a second car" is not acceptable, "rent a gas car" is not acceptable and "find charging stations and take 45 minute breaks" isn't acceptable.
Very true point !
Here is another killing question - when you move - do you rent a car ?
I'm always follow a simple rule when I buy a car: it has to cover 80% of my needs. For the rest 20% such as occasional long road trip (>600 km one way ) , home depot materials pickup, etc, I rent an appropriate vehicle.
 

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The most fun is that most people prefer electric cars, not because of concern for ecology, but because they are much cheaper) So it was with me, so it was with my girl's father - he preferred e-Nissan.
 

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"Considering Going Electric" and "Going Electric" are two very different things. We are a 2 car family and for long trips we use the ICE car. For puttering around Atlanta we use the Bolt (our first electric). While we were car shopping it was not a decision that we would go electric.

+ Acceleration - Being the first electric car we have ever been in, we didn't know entirely what to expect on the test drive. I believe pulling out of the lot we spun the tires.
+ Ride - Incredibly smooth & quiet. By the time we finished the test drive my wife was open to the idea of electric.
+ Maintenance - Tires every 7,500 and a cabin filter every other tire rotation is all until 150k?!
+/- Interior - This is where I think the Bolt looses some perspective customers. The interior is not bad, but it is definitely done on a budget. It reminds me a lot of the Subaru's during the 90's; The money was spent in the boxer engine and AWD while the interior was reverse engineered to stay on budget.
+/- Range - This is a second car. So ~200 miles range is more than enough. If you are a 1 car family, weekend trips can become a little complicated especially in the SE where Level 3 chargers are still rare.
+/- $$$ - Many buyers (like us) were looking at gas powered compact crossovers. $24k up to $40k is a big jump. If the dealer didn't have a sale and we didn't qualify for the tax rebate, there is no way we would have proceeded with it.
+ Environment - Given the option most people would want to be more green; but we never once made this a key purchasing decision.

While weighing our options, there was really no reason to pick gas over electric except for a lower initial price. And I think a lot of people like the idea of electric because it does have a lot of benefits but there is a high admission price. Dealer discount plus income tax return combined takes ~$12k off the top and we will break even in ~4 years with fuel savings.

While the Bolt makes huge strides delivering 200 miles range in an affordable package, that affordability only is achieved with the $7500 tax break. All the benefits of electric won't win out for mainstream consumers unless the numbers work which is done either by reducing the cost of electric (lower battery costs) or increasing the cost of conventional cars (spike in gas).

If GM / Tesla / Yugo / Apple / Facebook can figure a way to build a compact crossover similar to the Bolt and make the numbers work without the rebate then I see a gas powered Civic becoming an endangered species.
 
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