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Discussion Starter #1
Since the M3 Dual Performance is a $60,000 + luxury performance sedan, it should be about twice as nice as our Bolt in most areas. However, as with wine, each increment of price increase does not necessarily equate to an equal increase in "goodness."

1. The M3 Dual Performance acceleration is other-worldly. The Bolt is quick; the M3 DP is mind-bendingly fast.

2. The M3 DP seats are at least twice as good as the Bolt.

3. The longer wheelbase smooths out the ride over bumps; especially speed bumps, where the Bolt is really bad.

4. All Teslas require a steep learning curve to operate all the bells-and-whistles. GM made the decision to make it as easy as possible to transition from an ICE.

5. The one area the Bolt is much better than the M3 is day-to-day errand in-and-out. The smaller size and the overhead camera make it easier to park and to maneuver in crowded parking lots. The Bolt's higher H-point is easier to enter/exit. The M3 is typical of today's performance sedans. The low H-point allows a lower roof line for a sleeker look, but taller driver's left shoulder is always behind the B-pillar and butts are almost dragging the highway; makes climbing in and out a chore.

Bottom line - I love driving the M3 DP, but the Bolt is still our first choice for day-to-day use.

jack vines
 

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Since the M3 Dual Performance is a $60,000 + luxury performance sedan, it should be about twice as nice as our Bolt in most areas. However, as with wine, each increment of price increase does not necessarily equate to an equal increase in "goodness."

1. The M3 Dual Performance acceleration is other-worldly. The Bolt is quick; the M3 DP is mind-bendingly fast.

2. The M3 DP seats are at least twice as good as the Bolt.

3. The longer wheelbase smooths out the ride over bumps; especially speed bumps, where the Bolt is really bad.

4. All Teslas require a steep learning curve to operate all the bells-and-whistles. GM made the decision to make it as easy as possible to transition from an ICE.

5. The one area the Bolt is much better than the M3 is day-to-day errand in-and-out. The smaller size and the overhead camera make it easier to park and to maneuver in crowded parking lots. The Bolt's higher H-point is easier to enter/exit. The M3 is typical of today's performance sedans. The low H-point allows a lower roof line for a sleeker look, but taller driver's left shoulder is always behind the B-pillar and butts are almost dragging the highway; makes climbing in and out a chore.

Bottom line - I love driving the M3 DP, but the Bolt is still our first choice for day-to-day use.

jack vines
Good comparison. With my HOV stickers expiring at the end of 2021 and EVs evolving, I'm planning on moving on from my 2017 Bolt around the end of next year. Right now, I'm leaning towards a Tesla and probably either the LR or Performance M3 because of the, well, performance, and the supercharging network and love reading good, honest reviews like these.

Thanks for posting!
 

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Agree with every point. I've had a lot of fast cars and I wasn't prepared for the acceleration of the M3P. It actually makes you lightheaded and gives you tunnel vision on full throttle. And yeah, I think that's a good thing! ;) I'd still pick the Bolt for my "prefer to drive everyday" same as your #5.

Mike
 

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Owning both vehicles myself, I agree. Although I don't think the learning curve is that bad, they're just different in how they approach things.

I'm hoping the Model Y addresses some of the issues of #5.

I love driving the Model 3 from a performance and comfort point of view, but I love driving the Bolt from a practicality and ease of parking/maneuvering point of view.
 

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Good comparison. With my HOV stickers expiring at the end of 2021 and EVs evolving, I'm planning on moving on from my 2017 Bolt around the end of next year. Right now, I'm leaning towards a Tesla and probably either the LR or Performance M3 because of the, well, performance, and the supercharging network and love reading good, honest reviews like these.

Thanks for posting!
Test the standard LR before you decide. I sometimes regret not holding off and getting the P but I needed a car soon and it wasn't available at the time. I've not driven a P but even the LR will pin you back and the thing is, I really don't get the opportunity to take full advantage of what it has now. If I had a P, it would be mostly unused unless I tracked it regularly.
I think it's great for a while but would be interested in how often the difference between the two versions (LR or P) really makes day to day. Even the LR gives my son nausea when pushed and I've never felt it lacking at on ramps and grabbing a gap in traffic.
 

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Since the M3 Dual Performance is a $60,000 + luxury performance sedan, it should be about twice as nice as our Bolt in most areas. However, as with wine, each increment of price increase does not necessarily equate to an equal increase in "goodness."
It's the Pareto's Principle which in this case translates to, roughly: You get 80% of the benefit for 20% of the price.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Test the standard LR before you decide. I sometimes regret not holding off and getting the P but I needed a car soon and it wasn't available at the time. I've not driven a P but even the LR will pin you back and the thing is, I really don't get the opportunity to take full advantage of what it has now. If I had a P, it would be mostly unused unless I tracked it regularly.
I think it's great for a while but would be interested in how often the difference between the two versions (LR or P) really makes day to day. Even the LR gives my son nausea when pushed and I've never felt it lacking at on ramps and grabbing a gap in traffic.
Agree, if cost is the determining factor.

Also agree, I found myself frustrated there weren't more opportunities to experience the rush.

Otherwise, if some's good, more is better and too much is just right.

jack vines
 

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I would just add that if you're considering any Tesla you can use Tesla's web based trip planner to see how many Super Charger stops you need to make and for how long to get to a destination. It will give you a good idea as to what to expect. Even if you'll never drive from Albany, NY to Houston it's still fun to see that it can be done and what the trip will be like.
 

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Test the standard LR before you decide. I sometimes regret not holding off and getting the P but I needed a car soon and it wasn't available at the time. I've not driven a P but even the LR will pin you back and the thing is, I really don't get the opportunity to take full advantage of what it has now. If I had a P, it would be mostly unused unless I tracked it regularly.
I think it's great for a while but would be interested in how often the difference between the two versions (LR or P) really makes day to day. Even the LR gives my son nausea when pushed and I've never felt it lacking at on ramps and grabbing a gap in traffic.
Yeah, that's good advice. I'm probably about 12-13 months away from getting close to anything and I imagine a lot will change by then (I have a Cybertruck reservation and am eager to see how that develops), but with Battery Day coming up and competition hopefully lighting a fire under Tesla, I'm guessing there'll be a ton of changes between now and the end of this year, let along 15 months from now.
 

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Yeah, that's good advice. I'm probably about 12-13 months away from getting close to anything and I imagine a lot will change by then (I have a Cybertruck reservation and am eager to see how that develops), but with Battery Day coming up and competition hopefully lighting a fire under Tesla, I'm guessing there'll be a ton of changes between now and the end of this year, let along 15 months from now.
Depending on where you live to you may want to wait until the heat pump makes it into the model three like it did the model Y. That’s one of the reasons they feel the model Y efficiency is on par with the model three so it could boost the model 3 to 340 miles EPA
 

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First off, tell me how many times you're going to use the "other-worldly acceleration". Unless you live in a wide-open area (which won't have many public chargers), I'm guessing not much.

Second, I cannot get past that stupid touch screen for every function on the car. I guess I'm somewhat of a Luddite, but I think the idea of having to go to a screen for everything is the most distracting thing you could do for a driver. And there aren't many drivers left anyways these days! We don't need to create more screens for idiots to look at while they're piloting a two ton car..

Rant off....
 

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Depending on where you live to you may want to wait until the heat pump makes it into the model three like it did the model Y. That’s one of the reasons they feel the model Y efficiency is on par with the model three so it could boost the model 3 to 340 miles EPA
Oh yeah, that heat pump would be a nice addition. Even here in California, it's amazing how often I use the heater in my Bolt so I agree with ya!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
First off, tell me how many times you're going to use the "other-worldly acceleration". Unless you live in a wide-open area (which won't have many public chargers), I'm guessing not much. Rant off....
One either loves it and finds opportunities to use it and finds it of value, or one doesn't. Your car, your money, your decision.

FWIW, I'm a 75-year-old hot rodder who never outgrew the urge to surge, but I long ago quit buying fast ICEs. The noise, the expense, the hassles were no longer a good tradeoff. However, the Dual Motor Tesla requires no compromise. Drive it like grandma and it performs beautifully. Drive it like ya stole it and it performs beyond anything you've ever experienced, unless you're a Top Fuel drag pilot.

jack vines
 

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I would just add that if you're considering any Tesla you can use Tesla's web based trip planner to see how many Super Charger stops you need to make and for how long to get to a destination. ......
Right, it's built in with the Tesla.

But then I found A Better Routeplanner !
This is the same function as Tesla's planner and it spurred me into buying a cheap used '17 Bolt Premier in LA and driving it to KC, no problem. (There's a glut of lease returns in Cali, I think.)

Later did I find that I can adjust it in more detailed settings for weather, wind, arrival %SOC at next stop.
Started at 114° in LA, then 22° with snow and slush in the Rockies, then 30 mph headwinds across the lonesome prairie.o_O

Fortunately I watched my Garmin, the GOM, its MIN and trend line and adjusted my speed accordingly.
There was once I started out too fast ( thought I had an easy leg) and ended going 63 mph on the interstate, but never arrived at less than 8% SOC.

Best I can say is, 'it can do road trips'....:sneaky:
 

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I would just add that if you're considering any Tesla you can use Tesla's web based trip planner to see how many Super Charger stops you need to make and for how long to get to a destination. It will give you a good idea as to what to expect. Even if you'll never drive from Albany, NY to Houston it's still fun to see that it can be done and what the trip will be like.
If you're referring to the route planning in the car, I agree, it's slick to say, "Take me to St. Louis", and up scrolls the route with all the necessary stops and for how long just like ABRP but more convenient. The one thing I like ABRP for better though is way points. I've not figured out how to do them with the built-in routing. If I have a trip that is more than from A to B, i'll plot it out on ABRP and upload it to the car but I've not gotten the results I expected. Have you tried that or how do you handle way points?
 

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Right, it's built in with the Tesla.

But then I found A Better Routeplanner !
This is the same function as Tesla's planner and it spurred me into buying a cheap used '17 Bolt Premier in LA and driving it to KC, no problem. (There's a glut of lease returns in Cali, I think.)

Later did I find that I can adjust it in more detailed settings for weather, wind, arrival %SOC at next stop.
Started at 114° in LA, then 22° with snow and slush in the Rockies, then 30 mph headwinds across the lonesome prairie.o_O

Fortunately I watched my Garmin, the GOM, its MIN and trend line and adjusted my speed accordingly.
There was once I started out too fast ( thought I had an easy leg) and ended going 63 mph on the interstate, but never arrived at less than 8% SOC.

Best I can say is, 'it can do road trips'....:sneaky:
Yes, this works for an EV Nerd (a term of endearment). But your average person doesn't want to play pilot and input weight, SOC, cross wind, tire rolling resistance, elevation change, temperature, battery degradation, ending SOC---and yes I'm exaggerating. The industry has a long way to go in terms of ease of use. I've tried showing potential buyers all the Apps on my phone--the Chevy App, ABRP, EVGo, EA, EVConnect, ChargePoint, Greenlots,etc. At that point you've lost them and they want nothing to do with a BEV. And at that point I haven't even gotten out my Chargepoint and EVGO RFID cards, let a lone shown them the EA App on my phone connected to Apple Pay.

It's too complicated and an anti-EV sales tool. I appreciate the technical fun all these tools provide. And if you want to use them that's fine. But the industry needs to provide something simple and built in like Tesla has.

I'm looking forward to see what travel integration the Mach-E provides. I'm sure it will be a step up from what current BEVs provide.
 

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If you're referring to the route planning in the car, I agree, it's slick to say, "Take me to St. Louis", and up scrolls the route with all the necessary stops and for how long just like ABRP but more convenient. The one thing I like ABRP for better though is way points. I've not figured out how to do them with the built-in routing. If I have a trip that is more than from A to B, i'll plot it out on ABRP and upload it to the car but I've not gotten the results I expected. Have you tried that or how do you handle way points?
I see what you mean. Yea, I don't use way points, and for some that's a weakness with the built in Tesla route planner. If I'm going from Los Angeles to Butte, Montana I would just pick my meal/hotel stops in Vegas or Salt lake city and navigate to there as separate routes. Then probably from Salt Lake all the way to Butte the following day.
 

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First off, tell me how many times you're going to use the "other-worldly acceleration".
I had a Prius with pitiful acceleration, and people would purposely deny me to pass, presumably because they hate Prius. Now I mostly drive a Mazda CX-5, which is almost as pitiful in the acceleration department. Out here, people want to drive 45 MPH in a 55 zone, and then when a passing lane opens up they speed up to 90.

Normally I don't care about acceleration, but getting stuck behind A-hole drivers is shortening my life, and those very long passes in the oncoming lane add unnecessary risk.
 

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.... But your average person doesn't want to play pilot and input weight, SOC, cross wind, tire rolling resistance, elevation change, temperature, battery degradation, ending SOC---and yes I'm exaggerating. ...
Yes, that is a big exaggeration.
I found ABRP worked great with its default settings.
I poked in I had a '17 Bolt and said "Take me to Kansas City" and it was off to the races ! (y)

It really wasn't until the cold, rainy, 30 mph headwinds that I dug into the advanced settings.
I have a 'pay for data' phone plan, so I would talk to the Garmin and tell it the next charger address.
I didn't have ABRP running while driving.

The swerve to Moab, UT to get a free DCFC and see Arches Park was amazing!
ABRP got me back to I-70 via the Colorado River. It was a beautiful side trip!
The ChargePoint DCFC there was 30 seconds, tap phone to green light on dash.
I don't have good things to say about the EA system....:mad:

I find having a dedicated Nav system just a lot easier.
It is a dedicated Nav display and doesn't step on my favorite Bangles song with turns or when mom calls me.:(

This system worked fine for me and I didn't have to buy a $60 -120k Tesla to get the same route planning function.
Just $16.2k for a 49k mile Premier!
I can now cruise the EV Highway !!:cool:

BTW, ABRP knows the elevation profile of each leg! Click on it and you can see your SOC go up during the descent out of the Rockies! It's an amazing app !!!
 
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