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My '20 is getting battery replaced in mid Dec. according to my dealer ...
The dealer doesn't control which cars get replacements when - that's up to GM and they do it based on their assessment of risk.

I'm not sure what order they'll proceed in once the known high risk cars are dealt with, but it makes sense to me that they'd go from oldest to newest. I say this for two reasons:
  1. Older cars mean more cycles on the battery and that means any issues with the cells are likely to be closer to the critical point.
  2. Replacing the batteries on newer cars later is in some sense more beneficial to the customers. It's a bigger benefit to get a brand new battery after 50,000 miles of use on the old one than it is after 30,000 miles of use.
 

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My '19 (number *881 recall number) was replaced on Monday (two days ago). Range jumped to 268 miles after recharging after a 200 mile trip down 101 to Monterey and back.

I heard at some point that the *880 recall numbers were lower priority. The more people reporting in, the more data we have on replacements.
Cars under recall are initially under GM campaign numbers ending with 0. They are moved to a GM campaign number ending with 1 when GM decides that they are eligible to receive new batteries (based on GM's determination of fire risk, where the highest risk cars are made eligible for new batteries sooner).

You can see reported notifications and replacements from these forums at Battery replacement recall remedy tracking summary .
 

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The dealer doesn't control which cars get replacements when - that's up to GM and they do it based on their assessment of risk.

I'm not sure what order they'll proceed in once the known high risk cars are dealt with, but it makes sense to me that they'd go from oldest to newest. I say this for two reasons:
  1. Older cars mean more cycles on the battery and that means any issues with the cells are likely to be closer to the critical point.
  2. Replacing the batteries on newer cars later is in some sense more beneficial to the customers. It's a bigger benefit to get a brand new battery after 50,000 miles of use on the old one than it is after 30,000 miles of use.
Regarding #1 above, the apparent base risk level is:
  1. 2019 cars with Korea-made batteries, cars whose batteries were replaced in late 2018 with Korea-made batteries, and cars whose batteries were flagged by the April / May software (or the new software, once it gets installed in enough cars to flag some batteries), or which were awaiting battery (module) replacements for other reasons.
  2. 2017-2018 cars.
  3. Cars with US-made batteries (some 2019 and all 2020-2022 under recall).
However, charge / discharge history from OnStar records is apparently used to adjust risk level of each individual car.

It appears that recall eligibility so far has mostly happened in a mid October batch and an early November batch. It looks like most, but not all, of the first group listed above, and a few of the second group listed above, have been made remedy eligible. This is probably about a tenth or so of the total number of recalled cars.

Regarding #2 above about the benefit of a later battery replacement, it depends on the customer's situation. Someone leasing a car would want the replacement as soon as possible, since they will not gain any advantage from the warranty extension, but the sooner replacement means sooner removing of fire risk and GM advisory restrictions on use. Someone who can only park in a garage in a flammable building and has a long commute that requires higher risk charging and discharging will be more interested in removing the fire risk sooner (versus getting a new battery later with a later warranty expiration) than someone who parks outside away from anything flammable anyway, and whose driving stays within the GM advisory limits anyway.
 
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