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I have 2017 Bolt w/ just under 24,000 miles on it. When I had it in for the battery recall “permanent fix”a couple of weeks ago, I asked what they would give me as a flat buy out. They came back with $13k. They said it was book value. I didn’t bite. Thought the offer was too low.
 

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.... I asked what they would give me as a flat buy out. They came back with $13k. They said it was book value. ....
Yeah, you can't deal with the local dogs. They're dogs.
You have to go through corporate and complain,,, but say you like the trade up possibilities you've been reading about!!
They have a whole floor in Detroit dedicated to doing this work.
 

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I have 2017 Bolt w/ just under 24,000 miles on it. When I had it in for the battery recall “permanent fix”a couple of weeks ago, I asked what they would give me as a flat buy out. They came back with $13k. They said it was book value. I didn’t bite. Thought the offer was too low.
I am noticing dealer offer is usually $5K below selling price. Get a price quote from Carvana?
 

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I have 2017 Bolt w/ just under 24,000 miles on it.
As a follow up to my OP - I'd prefer a cash buy-out 'cause I want to get a larger vehicle, like a mid-size SUV.

I truly love my Bolt. It's so much fun to drive and people who ride with me often comment about how comfortable it is. But, I'd like to have something with more hauling capacity; trips to the home improvement center can often be a challenge.

Our other car is a 2017 Volt, so we don't have a lot of hauling capacity in it either. (As a side bar, my spouse and his sister are currently stranded in Texas -- over 1,000 miles from home -- due to failure of the Battery Energy Control Module [BECM]. Apparently, this is a known issue with the Volt. :mad: The dealer that has the car said they hoped they could get it fixed in a week. Needless to say, the stranded parties are not happy campers!)

If I decide to trade-in my Bolt, I want to stay electric; but, at this point in time, the pickins are few. I wish Chevy would come out with a plug-in hybrid of the Blazer. I'd entertain that option!

I've looked at the Toyota RAV4 Prime, which is a plug-in hybrid, but the cargo space on it is surprisingly not that much larger than the Bolt.

I've also seen info about the Nissan Ariya that's coming out later this year. It looks nice on paper, but I really can't tell about size, etc., until I see it in person. And, then, do I again want to be an early adopter of new technology/new car design - as I was with the Bolt - and be among their ultimate beta testers?

I was worried about my Bolt going up in flames due to the battery issue, but I'm hopeful the "permanent fix" will indeed be permanent and the battery fire issue will go away. That said, I figure what I'm ultimately going to do is hold on to my Bolt for a few more years, until there are more electric vehicles on the market, and then consider a trade-in. In the meantime, I'll just continue to ask my brother-in-law if he'll help me haul stuff in his truck. 🤷‍♂️
 

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This is my Recall Experience:

35601


I was really hoping the new SW was going to reset my GOM brains,, OR,,
report to the Mothership that all is not well in this battery pack.
I was hoping for a faulty cell/module to self-report with the new SW and a repair would be initiated.

I know the GOM is not battery capacity display.
I know I don't flog it too hard and this time of year HVAC is not used much at all.
Non LRR tires in the front.
This car is ~85% at 65-75 mph on the interstate.
But still, this seems low.

What are my options?
Complain to the dealer and pay a $100 'Diagnostics Fee'?
I had this low range complaint noted when I dropped it off for the final SW load.
Any suggestions from you guys?
 

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This is my Recall Experience:

View attachment 35601

I was really hoping the new SW was going to reset my GOM brains,, OR,,
report to the Mothership that all is not well in this battery pack.
I was hoping for a faulty cell/module to self-report with the new SW and a repair would be initiated.

I know the GOM is not battery capacity display.
I know I don't flog it too hard and this time of year HVAC is not used much at all.
Non LRR tires in the front.
This car is ~85% at 65-75 mph on the interstate.
But still, this seems low.

What are my options?
Complain to the dealer and pay a $100 'Diagnostics Fee'?
I had this low range complaint noted when I dropped it off for the final SW load.
Any suggestions from you guys?
If you're willing to spend time figuring it out, an ODB2 reader and the Torque Pro app would be cheaper than the $100 diagnostics fee. See the directions at Chevy Bolt OBD2 PIDs – All EV Info

Having said that, assuming (granted, a poor assumption) that 177 is an accurate proxy for your battery capacity compared to new, 177 / 238 = 74%, which doesn't trigger the battery warranty. You'd have to show that something else weird is going on, like:
 

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....Having said that, assuming (granted, a poor assumption) that 177 is an accurate proxy for your battery capacity compared to new, 177 / 238 = 74%, which doesn't trigger the battery warranty. You'd have to show that something else weird is going on, ....
And still have to pay the fee to get anything going on warranty claims.
What is the warranty trigger?

Thanks for the advice!
 

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And still have to pay the fee to get anything going on warranty claims.
What is the warranty trigger?

Thanks for the advice!
I'm not Chevrolet, but it's probably >40% degradation. The battery warranty for my 2020 reads (attached below, page 14):
"Like all batteries, the amount of energy that the high voltage 'propulsion' battery can store will decrease with time and miles driven. Depending on use, the battery may degrade as little as 10% to as much as 40% of capacity over the warranty period. If there are questions pertaining to battery capacity, a dealer service technician could determine if the vehicle is within parameters."
 

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I'm not Chevrolet, but it's probably >40% degradation. The battery warranty for my 2020 reads (attached below, page 14):
"Like all batteries, the amount of energy that the high voltage 'propulsion' battery can store will decrease with time and miles driven. Depending on use, the battery may degrade as little as 10% to as much as 40% of capacity over the warranty period. If there are questions pertaining to battery capacity, a dealer service technician could determine if the vehicle is within parameters."
Yep, looks like warranty is at 60% original capacity. So 238 to 142 miles... still very usable for most commuters.


 

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I don't know how to read the printout...what is the bottom line?
Second page lines 1 and 8 shouldn't be any more than .08 apart (mine isn't) and all the not failed lines further down and the last page.
Bottom line is...seems my battery came out fine. For that one time test. Seems someone here went to 2 different dealers and got different results.
 

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I was told I'd have to bring $15k+ to trade my 2018 Premier for a 2020 Premier or a 2021 LT. Not happening.
My 2019 was not part of the recall but the sales guy reduced the rebates by $2K and said I need to bring ~$10.5K to get a 2021. I had estimated $7.5K then maybe talking down to a couple thousand as I only have 15k miles. What a rip off.
 

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I was told I'd have to bring $15k+ to trade my 2018 Premier for a 2020 Premier or a 2021 LT. Not happening.
Was that from the dealer, or from GM? If you really want to pursue a buyback from GM, contact the Chevy Bolt concierge directly (833-EV-CHEVY). However, what GM offers may depend on the lemon laws in your state.
 

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Seems right to me given your driving history. ...
😕
This is your experience when driving at interstates speeds?
~85% of the time. Spring time. No Heating or Cooling?

Oh well, I asked for opinions....
 

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😕
This is your experience when driving at interstates speeds?
~85% of the time. Spring time. No Heating or Cooling?

Oh well, I asked for opinions....
Well, unlike ICE vehicles, electric vehicles are actually less efficient at highway speeds. EPA highway mileage for the Bolt is 110 MPGe, which translates to roughly 3.26 miles / kWh. So 60 kWh x 3.26 miles / kWh = 195.6 miles. 177 / 195.6 = 90.5% after 62,445 miles. That seems reasonable.
 

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Had the permanent battery recall performed on my 2017 Bolt yesterday. About 25K miles on the car, used mostly for non-highway commute. Today I got a full charge, GOM showing 244 miles range which is about what I'd seen before a recent long trip (I skipped the interim recall). I bought the vehicle used a few months ago betting GM would make good on this issue, as far as I'm concerned they did.

35619
 

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Well, unlike ICE vehicles, electric vehicles are actually less efficient at highway speeds.....
177 / 195.6 = 90.5% after 62,445 miles. That seems reasonable.
I agree with your math, (guess I'll have to deal with my degradation), but not the 'less efficient at speed' statement.
A body moving through air has the drag increase by the square of the velocity.
Both ICE and EV's take more power as speed increases.
EV's don't waste as much of their energy to heat. All 5% or so for EV's. ICE waste >70% to heat.

I assume the GOM calculates from a default speed that uses that default 3.9m/kW value the trip meter resets to.
What is that speed?
Less you get more miles/kWh. More and you get less.
 

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I agree with your math, (guess I'll have to deal with my degradation), but not the 'less efficient at speed' statement.
A body moving through air has the drag increase by the square of the velocity.
Both ICE and EV's take more power as speed increases.
EV's don't waste as much of their energy to heat. All 5% or so for EV's. ICE waste >70% to heat...
Yes, EVs are always more efficient than equivalent ICE vehicles. I meant that ICE vehicles are more efficient when their engines run at steady speed / power, less efficient when accelerating and decelerating in city driving. That's why you see better highway EPA MPG for ICE vehicles vs city EPA MPG.

By contrast, electric motors do not lose much efficiency when accelerating, and regenerative braking improves efficiency when decelerating in city driving. That's why you see better city EPA MPGe for EVs vs highway MPGe, the opposite of ICE vehicles.
 
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