Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey bolters, I just bought a used 2017 Bolt and there was not any form of cord/charger. Does anyone have suggestions on the best plan? Do I buy a home charger and a portable one? Can I get away with just one charger? Looking for timely advice. Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
829 Posts
In my opinion, the OEM charger should have been included in the deal. It's a really nice charger for what it's intended to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I will dig tomorrow morning. This thing had 1600 miles total. I don’t think they customized much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
The foam is there, but there is nothing in it. So back to the original question. Are there things to look out for when buying a replacement? Should I just get a permanent charger installed in my house? Any advice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,203 Posts
I have found it good to have both. I have the Siemens VersiCharge (<$500, 30 amp, NEMA 6-50 plugged, portable, 24 rmpch {range miles per charging hour}) which I installed myself in my garage. I made a 10 foot extension cord with a NEMA 14-50 plug at one end and a (weatherproof) NEMA 6-50 receptacle at the other. Every RV park and KoA Kampground in the US has NEMA 14-50 outlets. They have allowed me to use them (if < 2-4 hours, for free; if overnight, for $10). This has expanded (enabled?) my back-in-the-mountains exploring a great deal.

I have also used the AC Level 1 EVSE supplied with my new 2017 Bolt EV more times than I can count. Whenever my wife and I check into a hotel with no AC Level 2 EVSE, I ask if they have an outside 110VAC outlet. They (nearly) always have had one and have always allowed me to use it (for free) to the tune of 50-60 more range miles the next am. These are NOT trip-dependent miles, but rather range-anxiety-eliminating miles. When I stay with family (some in Ann Arbor, MI 375 miles from home) I plug into the 110 garage outlet to the same end.

Lastly, I bought the Tesla Tap which allows me to use Tesla destination chargers (NOT Tesla Superchargers).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,540 Posts
It was worth a shot. How much do you drive? What can you plug into at home? Will you travel? What's your budget? Do you own your home?

A dual voltage portable EVSE with adjustable amps would be the most versatile. Some have gotten the Tesla EVSE and buy the additional adapter to make it work for the Bolt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
So many terms that I don’t understand. I have a lot to learn... thanks for the reply.

I drive about 60-70 miles a day and own my home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
The OEM charger in the picture above is a level 1 charger - it can be plugged into a standard outlet and will charge the car slowly - about 4 miles of range per hour of charging.
To get faster charging you could buy a level 2 charger which will add about 24 miles per hour, but you need a 240 volt outlet for that. What you should get depends on your needs. Many Bolt owners install a level 2 at home. Some of us just use the slow level 1 at home (I have level 2 chargers available where I work). Some have level 2 at home and carry the level 1 charger with them.

EDIT: Now seeing your post above, unless you have level 2 chargers available somewhere else convenient (like the office), going 60-70 miles a day you will probably want to get a level 2 charger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,676 Posts
So many terms that I don’t understand. I have a lot to learn... thanks for the reply.

I drive about 60-70 miles a day and own my home.
Put a 14-50 outlet in your garage. This will give you the greatest flexibility for charging at home, and away. Unless you live in an urban area with variable pricing for power, I would not waste money on an internet connected EVSE. The car can be programmed for charge time, if that interests you.

If this describes your situation, and you ever plan to travel with the Bolt, I suggest this combo.




Nothing will be more dependable, or more flexible. It will take up little more space than the factory EVSE on a trip, and is many times more useful. Unscrew the plastic knob and take out the styrofoam for much more storage room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,540 Posts
So many terms that I don’t understand. I have a lot to learn... thanks for the reply.

I drive about 60-70 miles a day and own my home.
You did what I did. Bought the car then had to figure out how I was going to charge it at the house. With your daily mileage, you'll want to have something that runs off 240V. Now getting 240V is now the issue. Dryer outlet, run a new line, and/or how much panel capacity you have are options/factors. Along with cost of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I've done the math on a 60 mile commute. It's doable, but tight on 120V; you'll likely be losing charge and have to catch up on weekends.

240V/20A service is good enough for your drive and might be very easy to install if you are lucky and have a 5-20 socket with a dedicated circuit. 240V/50A is current state of practice. Most electricians I've worked with only want to go as high as 40A service though, which is as high as the Bolt can charge.

Enjoy your new car.

EDIT: Deleted probably bad electrical advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Thanks again for all of the responses guys. I have an outlet in my garage that I always assumed was a 220 for a generator. I will need to take a closer look when I get home and see if I can avoid an electrician bill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
As a last note, you can always put a higher current socket on a lower current circuit (i.e. replace a 14-30 socket with a 6-50 plug), but not vice versa.
I am pretty sure that you have that backwards. The socket should never "advertise" more current than the breaker or wiring can handle. (There is ONE exception that I know about in the electrical code - it is OK to put a 14-50 socket on a 40A circuit {rating for breaker + wiring} - there is no 40A standard NEMA socket.)

Placing a 50A socket on a 30 amp circuit is a no-no. Devices with 50A plugs might just pull 50A, and (if you are lucky) the circuit breaker will pop. (If you are unlucky, the breaker sticks, the wiring overheats and either melts or starts a fire - or both.)

Placing a 30A socket on a circuit (breaker + wiring) that is rated for 50A is just fine - no danger, the device plugged in should not expect to be able to pull more than 30A.

(The circuit breaker is sized for the wiring, and its purpose is to save the wiring from overheating and the house from burning - its purpose is NOT to save some electrical device from going crazy and killing itself by drawing too much electricity than the device is rated.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Hey bolters, I just bought a used 2017 Bolt and there was not any form of cord/charger. Does anyone have suggestions on the best plan? Do I buy a home charger and a portable one? Can I get away with just one charger? Looking for timely advice. Thanks in advance.
What no 120 V factory charger? Did you get it from a dealer? If so go back and demand the factory charger (how you going to drive without it?). If you got it from a private party go back and ask them where it went.

Did you look under the seats? Did you look under the front hood? Seems very odd this car is missing it's factory 120 V charger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
27574

I looked it up and I think that this is a nema 6-20r? Is this something that I can use, convert on my own, not even the same ballpark? I am comfortable changing light switches and sockets at 120v. In theory I could change this to the right kind of that is all it takes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I am pretty sure that you have that backwards. The socket should never "advertise" more current than the breaker or wiring can handle. (There is ONE exception that I know about in the electrical code - it is OK to put a 14-50 socket on a 40A circuit {rating for breaker + wiring} - there is no 40A standard NEMA socket.)

Placing a 50A socket on a 30 amp circuit is a no-no. Devices with 50A plugs might just pull 50A, and (if you are lucky) the circuit breaker will pop. (If you are unlucky, the breaker sticks, the wiring overheats and either melts or starts a fire - or both.)

Placing a 30A socket on a circuit (breaker + wiring) that is rated for 50A is just fine - no danger, the device plugged in should not expect to be able to pull more than 30A.

(The circuit breaker is sized for the wiring, and its purpose is to save the wiring from overheating and the house from burning - its purpose is NOT to save some electrical device from going crazy and killing itself by drawing too much electricity than the device is rated.)
I think you are incorrect as well. Sockets should always match rated current draws, except for exceptions stated in the NEC or whatever your local code happens to be.
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top