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Finally happened, I got run down from behind with the Bolt maxed out. Nissan Pathfinder, probably a "Detroiter" headed "up North" for the weekend. At the rate he closed on me, must have been doing 100+ mph.

It's not uncommon for the "Detroiters" to cruise home at 90+ mph. I've paced them on my motorcycle. Speed limit is 75 mph.
 

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So what did the cop say?
Here in NM, when you are going 90, the cops drive by at 100. Then you are instantly passed by three or four small farm trucks following the cop, to be sure and be safe with their speed. *I have really had that experience.
 

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In this area of WV, many Detroiters come to visit (and to sell their cocaine)! However, they rarely speed. I wonder why!
I was ticketed for going 31 in a 25 in a small town outside of Morgantown. Ticket was over $300. So yes, don’t speed in WV!
 

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Why the hurry? Don't compete over speed, since you already have a much superior vehicle than that obsolete Nissan. I have a Fusion Hybrid and I see hundreds of imports passing me over the speed limit. I just stay cool and enjoy my 50+ MPG midsized sports-like sedan and drive in peace. They are the one who wear down their gas engine and brake pads, and pay out of their @$$e$ to get multiple oil changes and pad replacements!

In five years I have spent just $45 a year in the annual oil change and filter (which is the ONLY part replaced in those five years) and spent less than $400 a year in gasoline. And I know that in less than four years, those import owners have to replace their "disposable" cars, too, and continue to litter local junk yards with useless vehicles.

You will have your Chevy Bolt EV looking and running as good as new in those four years, while that Nissan owner will be out tossing the vehicle and spending thousands more for a new one. Just pray that he decides for a Leaf instead!
 

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In five years I have spent just $45 a year in the annual oil change and filter (which is the ONLY part replaced in those five years) and spent less than $400 a year in gasoline. And I know that in less than four years, those import owners have to replace their "disposable" cars, too, and continue to litter local junk yards with useless vehicles.
We'll have to agree to disagree on this one. I know many low-priced mid-size and compact cars running fine for 15-20 years and 250,000 miles. All most ask is regular oil and filter changes. Most vehicles live longer than the owner deserves, given the way they're treated.

jack vines
 

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Finally happened, I got run down from behind with the Bolt maxed out. Nissan Pathfinder, probably a "Detroiter" headed "up North" for the weekend. At the rate he closed on me, must have been doing 100+ mph. It's not uncommon for the "Detroiters" to cruise home at 90+ mph. I've paced them on my motorcycle. Speed limit is 75 mph.
Perception is within the individual and cannot be argued; it is what it is. In my younger days, I've driven small cars fast, as well as motorcycles. That was then and this is now; the honking huge quad-cab pickup trucks and giant SUVs prevalent today, plus the incredible speed and density, have so changed our perceptions of what is the norm, I can no longer imagine being out in urban freeway traffic in my Sunbeam Tiger or Triumph Bonneville; it just doesn't feel safe anymore.

OTOH, the Bolt still seems reasonable size and safety to me, but my wife doesn't feel comfortable in it on the freeway. She argues to take the SUV and that's one I let her win.

jack vines
 

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I drove my Subaru Legacy like a rally racer in my youth, and all I ever did was oil chances, a set of spark plugs and wires, tires and brakes. Probably spent $300 total in the 100k miles I had it. Was still running fine when it was rear-ended at 220,000 miles. Only vehicle that has given me grief is the truck, but that's what trucks do.
 

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Only vehicle that has given me grief is the truck, but that's what trucks do.
Your experiences vary, or it must be my day to disagree. My experience over sixty years of truck ownership is they're simpler, better built, sturdier and required less maintenance than cars because they had fewer bells and whistles. Because of the barn door aero and lower gearing, what they never did was be fuel-efficient.

Having said that, the line is blurring. The Honda Ridgeline is just a van with pickup box. Subaru had a wagon with a box even earlier.

Only recently did trucks get overly complicated. Then, people who shouldn't own trucks want all the luxury car conveniences, complicating what was a simple beast of burden into a $100,000 King Ranch Harley Davidson Blackwood Sport Utility Truck/ESV.

Father's Day brings to mind my granddad, dad and uncles always bought the least expensive truck Studebaker offered and drove it as long as it could be kept running; they needed cost-effective utility, not a manhood extension. After '64, mother had to force dad to buy a Styleside Chevy with an automatic so she could drive it.

jack vines
 

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OTOH, the Bolt still seems reasonable size and safety to me, but my wife doesn't feel comfortable in it on the freeway. She argues to take the SUV and that's one I let her win.
The Bolt has a really good safety rating, and when a drunk 74-year-old driver drove their Bolt in the wrong direction on the freeway, they suffered a head-on collision and survived while two occupants of the other car died (the driver got 20–30 years in prison).

Driving a large and slow-to-respond vehicle doesn't make you safer, it may make it harder to perform an avoidance maneuver to dodge an accident. The instant power and nimbleness of the Bolt, makes it a good car for the freeway. It's also quite a tall and heavy car, which are both typically cited as the factor for preferring a large SUV.

Finally, human performance and behavior factors contribute to more than 90 percent of crashes, according to NHTSA. It's far less about the car and far more about the person behind the wheel.
 

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The Bolt has a really good safety rating, and when a drunk 74-year-old driver drove their Bolt in the wrong direction on the freeway, they suffered a head-on collision and survived while two occupants of the other car died (the driver got 20–30 years in prison).

Driving a large and slow-to-respond vehicle doesn't make you safer, it may make it harder to perform an avoidance maneuver to dodge an accident. The instant power and nimbleness of the Bolt, makes it a good car for the freeway. It's also quite a tall and heavy car, which are both typically cited as the factor for preferring a large SUV.

Finally, human performance and behavior factors contribute to more than 90 percent of crashes, according to NHTSA. It's far less about the car and far more about the person behind the wheel.

Which is why the first description should be "collision". Wait for a determination of cause before calling it an "accident". Few collisions are accidents. It's almost always some human's fault.
 
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