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Can someone tell me the best options for using a 30 amp 3 prong dryer outlet? Can I use a 32 amp charger or would I need a 24 amp to stay below the 30 amps? I'm having trouble finding adapters to convert, is there a safety issue that would require electrical work?This would just be used occasionally, so probably want a portable charging set up.

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Yes, you need to stay at or below 80% continuous duty of rated circuit. 30*.8=24
Some 32 amp chargers are configurable so that they can be reduced in amperage so not all hope is lost. Not a safety issue, there's lots of sources (especially from Tesla).
 

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Another consideration is if the circuit/outlet is aged out or worn out and a safety hazard at pulling the continuous EV loads. Your 10-30 outlet will also limit your EVSE choices without an adaptor.

There are several suppliers of plug adaptors if you need to convert from the 10-30 to x. In this example, its 10-30 to 14-50. https://www.autochargers.ca/products/juicebox-chargers/dryer_Adapter.html. Or make your own if comfortable doing that. This allows more choice in what charger to get.


Occasional use? What about a portable "turbocord" type? Here is an example from amazon: [ame]https://www.amazon.com/Level-Portable-Electric-Vehicle-Charger/dp/B018A6QK7C/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1512840013&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=turbocord+ev[/ame]
 

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To the above comments, I would add you should check what breaker is on the outlet...it should be 30A. And the wire, if it is visible (like stapled to the wall) should be labelled 10 AWG somewhere in the markings, i.e. 10 gauge. Higher gauge (12AWG) is not ok, lower is fine.

If its 10AWG and a 30A breaker, then 24A is the max continuous (if the outlet is in good shape). If not, its easy/cheap to DIY change the outlet to a new one.
 

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To the above comments, I would add you should check what breaker is on the outlet...it should be 30A. And the wire, if it is visible (like stapled to the wall) should be labelled 10 AWG somewhere in the markings, i.e. 10 gauge. Higher gauge (12AWG) is not ok, lower is fine.

If its 10AWG and a 30A breaker, then 24A is the max continuous (if the outlet is in good shape). If not, its easy/cheap to DIY change the outlet to a new one.
Bear in mind that wire also has temperature ratings and other factors to consider. It is possible that this circuit was installed with stranded aluminum or other wire that is not up to today's standards.
 
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