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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

Received my Bolt on the 24th of November and loving it. I have a holiday trip planned to my folks' place, and I am planning ahead for charging.

My parents' garage has a standard 115volt plug, so worst case, I can use that on 8amp mode to keep the battery warm and slowly charge. There is also a level 3 station about 20km away, so I can get the battery up to 100% quite quickly for the return journey.

However, they also have a welding circuit, with a 250v 15amp circuit. I looked up the receptacle online, and it is a NEMA 6-15R.I found: http://a.co/1bwXdhX this on Amazon(.ca), and I believe it should do the trick, but I want to double check my logic / knowledge:

The adapter is NEMA 6-30P to NEMA 15-50R. I cannot seem to find a 6-15P to 15-50R adapter (as from what I can tell, 6-15 is rare to find these days). From my research, a 6-15R should accept a 6-30P without issue. Am I correct?

If so - I can setup my Juicebox to draw 12amps at 250v; however, my remaining concern is that the adapter is rated for 50amps service. Am I right in assuming that as long as I keep the JB at 12amps, I am fine?
 

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According to Wikipedia: The 30*A plug and receptacle look similar to the 15*A one but larger

I don't have personal experience with the two dash types of the NEMA 6 so can't be much more help. Just surprises me that it would work. If you're handy, the adapter would be easy to make and would be cheaper.

The adapter rating of 50 Amps is in your favor, but you need to limit to 12 A to not trip the 15 Amp breaker that should be protecting the circuit.
 

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A second option would be to just use the stock charger that comes with the car since it maxes itself out at 12 amps 240v (it does 240 and 120). You would just need an adapter to 15-50R.
 

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possible solution

You might look into a converter like the one I recently bought.
I also have a new Bolt and Volt, and ordered this for the Volt (shouldn't need more than 12A for overnight charge).
I'm too junior of a user to post a direct link, so you might have to work harder to find (sorry):
etsy dot com listing 384390572 for a chevy volt/bolt ev level 2 charge
I found Chris to be very helpful with questions on the shop site.
 

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From my research, a 6-15R should accept a 6-30P without issue. Am I correct?
No. The 6-30 is larger (same blade configuration but the diameter of the plug/receptacle is greater).

You'll likely need to either make your own adapter or order a $$$$ custom one.
 

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Or, replace the outlet, or install a new outlet with a 14-50 in a box next to the 16-30. You probably won't be welding at the same time as charging...
 

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Or, replace the outlet, or install a new outlet with a 14-50 in a box next to the 16-30. You probably won't be welding at the same time as charging...
:eek:

This is why some jurisdictions prohibit homeowners from doing electrical work and require it to be done by a licensed electrician.

If you don't know why both of these are bad ideas, hire someone that does.
 

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Tesla portable charger and its adapters

As far as I know, the safest way to approach these problems is by use of the Tesla portable charger, which has a bunch of adapters for different sockets, and it is safe to use. I would check the Tesla web site, or the QuickChargePower web site. Its a bit costly for some, but the alternative is to fiddle with stuff that is easy to screw up and overload circuits.
 

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However, they also have a welding circuit, with a 250v 15amp circuit. I looked up the receptacle online, and it is a NEMA 6-15R.

I cannot seem to find a 6-15P to 15-50R[sic] adapter
For 6-15P:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-250-Volt-6-15-QuickGrip-Plug-AH5666Y/206469373

For a 5-15R to adapt to Bolt OEM EVSE:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-125-Volt-Heavy-Duty-Grade-Quick-Grip-Connector-Yellow-AH5969Y/206469378
Edit: selected the above to match color and vendor more for aesthetics. Might be better to instead install a 5-20R. You won't find any of these officially rated for 240V (maybe in Europe!). Here's another vendor but with the matching yellow:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-20-Amp-125-Volt-Straight-Blade-Grounding-Connector-Yellow-White-5369-CY/301334976?

just use a short 12-14 gauge extension cord cable or some similar gauge romex between the two and you're set.

Bolt OEM EVSE will default to 12 amps. Don't even need your juicebox.
 

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For 6-15P:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-250-Volt-6-15-QuickGrip-Plug-AH5666Y/206469373

For a 5-15R to adapt to Bolt OEM EVSE:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-125-Volt-Heavy-Duty-Grade-Quick-Grip-Connector-Yellow-AH5969Y/206469378

just use a short 14 gauge extension cord cable or some similar gauge romex between the two and you're set.

Bolt OEM EVSE will default to 12 amps. Don't even need your juicebox.
Totally agree. Simplest, cheapest, safest option.
 

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...have a welding circuit, with a 250v 15amp circuit. I looked up the receptacle online, and it is a NEMA 6-15R.
Are you certain its a 15 amp 6-15R?

15 amps for a welder seems very unlikely. A 240 volt welder will generally draw 20 amps and up so will need a 30 amp, or more, breaker and receptacle.

There isn't an industry standard but many welders come with a 50 amp NEMA 6-50 plug to fit a NEMA 6-50 'welder' receptacle.

Here are some photos of various plugs/outlets: Museum of Plugs and Sockets A Google search will show far more.

Also you should look in the breaker panel and identify the rating of the breaker serving that outlet.
 

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A 240 volt welder will generally draw 20 amps and up so will need a 30 amp, or more, breaker and receptacle.
as an example, my welder is on a 30 amp circuit and has a NEMA 10-30

But, I have a wire feed welder that plugs into 120V 20 amp circuit. So maybe they have a setup for a MIG instead.
 

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Yes! Check the breaker. If it is a 15 amp or 20 amp, definitely stick to the portable EVSE. Get the correct male plug to make your adapter, and leave the original house wiring alone. If you make an adapter to use exclusively with your portable EVSE, nobody will be plugging a 14-50 device into an undersized circuit by mistake, because you replaced the outlet.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I love this forum. Thanks all for the responses so far - some real good options. I was worried that my assumption about the 6-15 and 6-30 was incorrect (I found diagrams, but not measurements in my googles).

I did not attach the photo, but I have a photo that shows the receptacle in detail - it is stamped with 250v 15, and moreover, the breaker was confirmed to be 15amps. I read up on the 6-15 socket/receptacle, and it mentioned: large room air conditioners, commercial kitchen equipment, and the occasional home arc welder.

^^ The location within the garage lends me to the later - the previous owner had a small workshop in the exact location of the plug - guessing an arc welder was the reason.

I have some more research to do - thank you all.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manual_metal_arc_welding
 

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For 6-15P:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-250-Volt-6-15-QuickGrip-Plug-AH5666Y/206469373

For a 5-15R to adapt to Bolt OEM EVSE:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eaton-15-Amp-125-Volt-Heavy-Duty-Grade-Quick-Grip-Connector-Yellow-AH5969Y/206469378
Edit: selected the above to match color and vendor more for aesthetics. Might be better to instead install a 5-20R. You won't find any of these officially rated for 240V (maybe in Europe!). Here's another vendor but with the matching yellow:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-20-Amp-125-Volt-Straight-Blade-Grounding-Connector-Yellow-White-5369-CY/301334976?

just use a short 12-14 gauge extension cord cable or some similar gauge romex between the two and you're set.

Bolt OEM EVSE will default to 12 amps. Don't even need your juicebox.
^^^^^^
What he said is exactly what I had in my garage and exactly what I used to create a dongle. Works great and doubles the charge rate.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Quick update to the post, summarizing what I learned and what I did (so that others might benefit):

Thanks to all the replies - I was able to put together and adapter for $28.60 (Canadian w taxes), and I believe the final product is going to work perfectly for the holiday trip.

As others mentioned, you can get the NEMA specifications from wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector). From that page (specifically the chart), you can see the requirements for the two ends of the adapter (one male end to connect to the 'odd' receptacle, and one to connect to the OEM EVSE).

So - knowing that the supply was a 15amp @ 240v, and with the knowledge from the other posters that the OEM EVSE can easily handle 12amps @ 240v, my game plan was simple:

Supplies:

1 - NEMA 6-15P plug (Wall to Adapter): https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.15-amp-rubber-ground-plug-250v.1000159340.html $14.28
2 - NEMA 5-20R plug (Adapter to EVSE): https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.20-amp-pvc-ground-connector-125v.1000159339.html $9.84
3 - 12AWG wire (1 foot): https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.sjoow-copper-electrical-cord---123-black-75m.1000823357.html $1.19

Notes:

1 - Could have probably found a cheaper 6-15P, but I wanted this done in one trip.
2 - Went with a 5-20R plug, instead of just 5-15, seemed prudent. Neither is officially rated for 240v, but as others said, that's simply because we are in North America.
3 - Could have used 14AWG, but again, 12AWG seemed prudent. As a bonus, the wire I selected has oil and water resistance (not that I plan on testing that). Seems well built.

Construction:

Nothing much to report - I did find it hard to get the 6-15P side wired up - the solution for that plug involved sandwiching the wires between a plate and the screw - just tricky to get it all together. I did manage to forget to attach the 'strain relief' part of the 5-20R before wiring it (which meant doing the work twice), but that side was a lot easier to work with, so I blame that one on fatigue and Netflix. I did a final check for any loose wires, double-checked all the connections were tight, and then used a multimeter (just to be sure the connections were good).

Tools needed:

Wire stripper/cutter.
Multimeter (honestly, overkill, but I was having fun).
Beer (I suggest a lager).

Results:

Attached is the final construction results. Based on http://pluginbc.ca/resource/charging-times/, I am looking at ~ 20 hours for a full charge, compared to >65 hours on a standard plug. This is a big win, since it limits my need for the Level 3 charger (as long as I have a day in between long journeys - which I do in this case).

Trip outcome:

I'll update once we make the trip - right now, I am still hesitant on the distance (about 230km one way), as if the weather is very bad (we could be -30 by late December), I worry about the lost range and heating losses adding up. There is a Level 2 along the way that I can hit up for reassurance, but since my family is with me, I want to minimize the risk. Our old ICE will be the backup.

Thanks all to those that offered help (and got me on the right path).
 

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