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I purchased a new Chevy Bolt 3 weeks ago.
Earlier today, December 18, 2017, I charged the Bolt in my office parking garage (open air, 48F degrees). It was charged in about 5 hours (the next 2 hours were a trickle charge). My Chargepoint account said the vehicle was fully charged.
I got in the Bolt, started it, and the screen said the battery had 188 miles. This is the 5th time I’ve charged the Bolt - always until receiving the "fully changed" notification, and I’ve never gotten it over 190 miles even though a full charge is supposed to be 238 miles.


Question:
If the battery capacity is supposed to be 238 miles, how does “fully charged” mean only 188 miles? Can a 48 degree temperature really limit battery capacity that much?
 

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I think it calculates an 'expected range' based on recent energy usage. So if you are a 'spirited driver' you may not get the full 238 miles. There is a display which rates your energy usage (I'm using a lot for heat with recent East Coast cold snap.)
 

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Question:
If the battery capacity is supposed to be 238 miles, how does “fully charged” mean only 188 miles? Can a 48 degree temperature really limit battery capacity that much?
48 degree temps may limit your capacity a few percent, make your batter discharge faster than typical, and heating the cabin takes a lot of energy. The 60 kWh capacity is based on 77 F. Not only this but your tire pressure may be lower and colder air equals higher air density. Your driving habits also play a role. Do you drive at high speeds or love to accelerate quickly. EV's have reduced range for a number of reasons. Once spring hits you will start to see your range start to approach the 238 miles.

I drive almost all highway miles. I get 150 mile range in mid 30 degree weather blasting the heat and I get 220 mile range in the summer blasting the air conditioner. In Spring wear I have no climate control I can push 250 mile range. Nothing is wrong with your battery or car. The 238 mileage is tested in optimal conditions.
 

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Question:
If the battery capacity is supposed to be 238 miles, how does “fully charged” mean only 188 miles? Can a 48 degree temperature really limit battery capacity that much?
The battery capacity is 60 kWh (@~70 degrees F). It will be slightly less in cooler weather.

The range you get from that 60 kWh will vary.

The 238 mile EPA range rating is based on a mix of city and freeway driving, and testing is done at or near that same 70 degrees.

Cold weather, use of heat, lots of freeway driving, short stints where the car heats and cools often, a lead foot, wind, hills, etc will all affect range (it also does in an ICE vehicle, but not to the same extent and people tend not to notice since they look at the fuel gauge instead of "range to empty").
 

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The battery capacity is 60 kWh (@~70 degrees F).

The range you get from that 60 kWh will vary.
Which is exactly the same as gas in an ICE vehicle. The tank holds a certain amount of gas, and how far you can go depends (for example) on whether you're going uphill or downhill, fast or slow, into a headwind or chasing a tailwind, etc. etc. etc.

The biggest difference is that in most ICE vehicles you don't have a big number on the dash telling you how far the car thinks you can go based on the amount of gas in the tank and the kind of driving you've been doing recently.
 

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Check your tire pressure. If it was sitting at the dealer awhile, it might be in the low 30s psi, and that can steal 20+ miles of range. I like to run 40-41 psi.

Also, the 'Guess-o-meter' uses the previous day/charge's consumption to estimate current range. IF it rained yesterday (lots of window defrost) or high speed on the freeway yesterday, then it thinks the range is crap today.

Also, outdoor temp is not as important as cabin heat setting. If you treat her like an ICE car, and punch max defrost every time it fogs, leave it like that for awhile, and run the cabin at 72°F with an airflow of 3-4, etc., that will kill your range even in mild weather. I tend to use the seat/wheel heaters and run the cabin at 62-5°F and '1' on the airflow. IF I am getting fogging...I set to defrost at '1' or '2' on the airflow.

Also, it might be using some old data from when it was sitting at the dealer doing a lot of conditioning (using energy at ZERO miles). Should work out.

How far does it actually go?

Tip: on the left, there are green and yellow vertical lines that emerge from the GOM number when driving. My wife and I call them the 'yellow tongue' and the 'green tongue'. These indicate the GOM modifying its estimate in real time.

Usage:

Wife (driving): "Lookit the giant green tongue I've got going over here!"
Me: "I saw that huge yellow tongue we had yesterday driving in that snowstorm, its just compensating."
 

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If, when driving, you put in neutral for a moment, you will see the kWh reading on the right of the circle in the driver's screen (assuming you are using ENHANCED screen which I do -- can get that using left-arrow, options, check-mark, etc.) If you have the cabin heat on, that could read well over the 0 kWh it should read in neutral.

And, yes, the DETAIL screen in the ENERGY menu on the large display will show the %age used for heating. That has to be 0 to have a chance of getting 238 miles. On warmish days here I have no trouble getting 4 mi/kWh and so 240 mile range. But it does not show me that on full charge because the cold days eat into that. The best strategy is to understand who many miles you get to a kWh in different conditions. The battery does hold 60 kwhs, so multiply by 60 for your range.
 

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I purchased a new Chevy Bolt 3 weeks ago.
Earlier today, December 18, 2017, I charged the Bolt in my office parking garage (open air, 48F degrees). It was charged in about 5 hours (the next 2 hours were a trickle charge). My Chargepoint account said the vehicle was fully charged.
I got in the Bolt, started it, and the screen said the battery had 188 miles. This is the 5th time I’ve charged the Bolt - always until receiving the "fully changed" notification, and I’ve never gotten it over 190 miles even though a full charge is supposed to be 238 miles.


Question:
If the battery capacity is supposed to be 238 miles, how does “fully charged” mean only 188 miles? Can a 48 degree temperature really limit battery capacity that much?
One other thing to check: My Bolt was delivered with the "Hill Top Reserve" option activated. This limits the battery charge to 88%. My understanding is that it is somehow bad for the battery to be fully charged in cold weather. Something about internal corrosion in Li-ion batteries. I now have my Bolt set to the Hill Top Reserve option for home charging only. If I am away from home on a road trip, I want to fully charge the battery, but for around town driving (99% of the time) I only charge it to 88% using the Hill Top Reserve feature. I hope this helps.
 

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AS A CHECK: 238miles at 60KWH(battery max) is right at 4.0 miles per KiloWattHour. Your tripmeter shows you what your average use rate has been (mine has ranged from 3.4 to 4.1 mi/KWH this winter) If you go to the menu Energy/Flow you'll see a pictorial of how many charged cells you have - each little bar is about 3KWH, each big bar is about 15KWH. Multiplying the number of little bars times 3 and then multiplying that by your recent average trip rate should give you your expected range at the current charge level. The result will probably will end up being the close to the same number you see on the range meter display.
 

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When you refuel a gas car, you look at the gas gauge to see if it's full. You might glance at the expected range, but you don't judge how much gas you have by the expected range. So with your Bolt, look at the battery gauge (20 green bands on left). If the gauge is all green, you have a full battery. Your expected range will vary, like your gas car but more. You know the rules for getting better mileage from a gas car & the EV is pretty similar.
 

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My understanding is that it is somehow bad for the battery to be fully charged in cold weather. Something about internal corrosion in Li-ion batteries. I now have my Bolt set to the Hill Top Reserve option for home charging only.
Li-ion batteries don't like to spend significant time at either end of the charge spectrum. So charging it up to full and leaving it is bad. Running it to near empty and leaving it is bad. Most batteries have a "hidden" reserve to protect from either extreme, I am not sure what the Bolt's is.

I had a Leaf for 3 years and never lost a bar despite regularly using DC chargers and charging to 100% on L2s. But I would normally charge to 100% and then near immediately use 15% of my battery getting home so it rarely spent any time sitting at full which I think is in part why I didn't see the capacity loss others have despite it spending lots of time sitting in direct sun on 90-105F days.

And at least on the Leaf, when you charge to 100% it would help re-balance the batteries, so was a good idea to at least occasionally top off to 100%. I have not seen that same behavior on my Bolt when I charge to 100%.
 
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