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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bought a '19 Bolt Premier w/infotainment package, driver confidence II and DC FC inlet about a week ago.

I'm not new to EVs though. My primary car since end of July 2013 was a '13 Leaf. Had leased an SV w/both packages (so had CHAdeMO inlet) for 2 years. Returned it and bought a used 5/2013 built '13 SV w/premium only (no CHAdeMO inlet) for $9,325 + tax and license that was ~25 months old and had under 24K miles. It's past 62K miles now and had been my primary car until I got my Bolt. It lost a capacity bar (~15% loss at time of bar loss) in November 2017 and still remains an 11 bar car.

Had an 06 Prius since Jan 06 and that was my "range extender". Sold that recently so I'm down to 2 EVs only now. Leaf will be sold soon when I find some time to clean it up a bit and advertise it.

I did consider used Bolts but there were hardly any on the market and the prices were not worth it vs. buying a new one and taking the full $7500 tax credit.

I'm not a veteran like those who had the GM EV1 or other EVs of that era.

Whoops! Did I post this in the wrong area?
 

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Welcome aboard ! We're generally a friendly bunch here. You will find a lot of superfluous topics and discussion here with very few serious car problems. This is good, and indicates they are satisfied owners of a solid car....
 

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Welcome aboard.

Here is quite different than any of the other marque fora of which I've ever been a part. The Bolt is so new, so well thought-out and so reliable, there are no real problem areas. Because there's little of mechanical substance to work through, we spend most of our time debating how many electrons are dancing on the charge port. Then, there's the small-but-active minority who are determined to make the Bolt a road trip car; as long as they're having fun, good on 'em.

FWIW, our Bolt is our first car in more than sixty years which has never been back to the dealership. I just got the monthly On-Star diagnostics e-mail saying all is well and reminding me of two recalls and the two-free-visits-in-two-years will be expiring in a few months. Now that's reliability.

jack vines
 

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Welcome aboard.

Here is quite different than any of the other marque fora of which I've ever been a part. The Bolt is so new, so well thought-out and so reliable, there are no real problem areas. Because there's little of mechanical substance to work through, we spend most of our time debating how many electrons are dancing on the charge port. Then, there's the small-but-active minority who are determined to make the Bolt a road trip car; as long as they're having fun, good on 'em.

FWIW, our Bolt is our first car in more than sixty years which has never been back to the dealership. I just got the monthly On-Star diagnostics e-mail saying all is well and reminding me of two recalls and the two-free-visits-in-two-years will be expiring in a few months. Now that's reliability.

jack vines
Curious, problem with doing a road trip with it?
 

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Curious, problem with doing a road trip with it?
For true, "road trip" is such an amorphous concept, any time it's discussed here, we should provide our personal definition.

Having traveled extensively for work, I'm quite aware for some nor'easters, 250 miles can cover several states, take all day and in sub-freezing temps. For south Texas, 250 miles can be done in less than four hours and never see a hill or a temp below fifty. Here in the frozen northwest, a road trip we make a couple of times a year is 725 miles in less than twelve hours. There are several stretches where the distance between charging opportunities exceeds the Bolts range at highway speeds in sub-freezing temperatures. There is a paid-for ICE in the garage, otherwise we'd be renting one when necessary to drive that trip.

jack vines
 

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Welcome aboard! I have made 11 trips of over 400 miles (longest 1 day trip was 520 miles) and find that it simply takes more planning. As we have NO CCS DCFC in the entire state, it is an exercise just to get to that first one in a neighboring state! Four times I overnighted at ~ the 200-230 mile mark. On the others, I simply plan a meal while the DCFC hums. I have never had to wait more than 20 minutes over my "meal time". I agree that many (most?) Bolt purchasers are using it as a commuter car that they only need to charge every 4-5 days, but I have never had to rent an ICEV in nearly 2 years.
 

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Curious, problem with doing a road trip with it?
As @Packard V8 noted, it depends both on your definition of a road trip and the kinds of conditions you drive in.

Our Bolt is my preferred car, including the kinds of road trips I'm likely to drive. For me, the most fun-to-drive road trips are about 200 miles, up over and back down mountains. They're not so long that they become too tiresome and the driving is fun and engaging. The Bolt loves that kind of drive and can do it without needing to charge before I reach my destination. So for that kind of road trip, the Bolt isn't just fun, it's pretty much ideal.

But let's explore some of the other kinds of road trips...

How far can you go without needing to charge?

If you drive at about 65 mph or less, the Bolt's official EPA 238 mile range is achievable, but if you drive faster, range drops due to added air resistance. The consensus on this forum and elsewhere seems to be that the range is about 190 miles at 75 mph. Temperature affects range too; if you need to run the heat or cool the car, range will drop. Cooling is more efficient than heating, but running seat heaters is more efficient than cooling air. In extreme heat or cold, the car may have to warm or cool the battery itself. So, depending on conditions, the range of the Bolt in winter might be as low as 150 miles (perhaps even less in really extreme situations). Add in the fact that people usually want a bit of a buffer rather than running the car all the way down to empty, which further reduces range.

So, if you're the kind of person who wants to drive 200 miles in winter 80 mph in sub-zero temperatures without stopping to charge, the Bolt won't be a great car to drive.

That said, I live somewhere where the conditions are usually pretty mild. Even in cases where I've driven long distances at speed, the worst efficiency I've seen on long trips is 3.6 miles/kWh, which means that the range of my Bolt has never dipped below 200 miles even though I tend to go at the speed of traffic. In fact, in my longest freeway trips I've averaged 3.89 miles/kWh, which is very close to the EPA range, perhaps because when I am going fast it's because I'm doing it to keep up with traffic and in that situation the car in front is reducing air resistance a bit. In pouring rain, I've seen efficiently as low as 3.2 miles/kWh (or 192 miles of range from a full charge), so I often still use the 190 miles of range number as my yardstick when planning trips that are mostly freeway driving.

When you need to charge...

For trips where you'll need to stop and charge, people vary a lot in what they're willing/able to do. To some, any kind of charging stop is just beyond the pale. For others, stopping to charge multiple times is no big deal. And for others, the charging infrastructure is too sketchy/non-existent to be usable.

If you pull into an Electrify America charging location (or any other 150A station that lets the Bolt charge at its maximum speed) at 15%, 30 minutes of charging will get you up to 57% (42% gained) and 45 minutes will take you to 71% (56% gained). So if the chargers are well placed, in an ideal world you can drive for 160 miles at 75 mph, stop for 45 minutes, and then drive another 105 miles at 75 mph and arrive at your destination with about 35 miles of EPA range left. Thus 268 miles is quite achievable without much hassle, and if you drive at slightly more modest speeds (or have the same kind of luck I've had going with the flow of traffic) so you get the Bolt's official EPA range, 330 miles is manageable with the same single stop to charge.

But the further you drive, the more charging stops you'll need. Road trips that are only just bearable in an ICE vehicle, like a 750 mile dash in 10 hours, will become much longer in a Bolt to the point of being impractical. Where the point of impracticality begins will vary from person to person.

Moreover, chargers aren't always placed ideally. EVgo's chargers aren't usually full speed. So if you want to gain 56% and pull into a 125A EVgo station at 25% rather than 15%, a 45 minute session will only net you 48% gained (90 miles at 75 mph). If you pull in with 35%, a 45 minute session will only net you an additional 43% (82 miles at 75 mph). In that latter case, you'd probably be better off charging for half an hour to gain 33% and then charging again later somewhere else.

And then there is always the worry that the charger you are depending on will be busy or just plain broken. For these reasons, for many people a road trip requires more planning and creates more stress than they're willing to suffer. These worries will diminish over the years as the charging networks continue to improve, however.

But the fundamentals of variable range based on conditions and needing to stop to charge if you're driving a long distance will always remain for the Bolt and all EVs on the market today.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you drive at about 65 mph or less, the Bolt's official EPA 238 mile range is achievable, but if you drive faster, range drops due to added air resistance. The consensus on this forum and elsewhere seems to be that the range is about 190 miles at 75 mph. Temperature affects range too; if you need to run the heat or cool the car, range will drop. Cooling is more efficient than heating, but running seat heaters is more efficient than cooling air. In extreme heat or cold, the car may have to warm or cool the battery itself. So, depending on conditions, the range of the Bolt in winter might be as low as 150 miles (perhaps even less in really extreme situations). Add in the fact that people usually want a bit of a buffer rather than running the car all the way down to empty, which further reduces range.
On this note, has some one put together a range chart for the Bolt similar to TonyWilliams's chart at http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?t=4295? The one many folks looked originally were the 24 kWh charts further down. He asserts that on a Leaf at 35 mph, on level ground, no HVAC + all the conditions listed, you should be able to on Leaf average 6.3 miles/kWh and thus get 132 miles until dead. This is exactly what Edmunds achieved on a new '11 Leaf: https://www.edmunds.com/nissan/leaf/2011/long-term-road-test/2011-nissan-leaf-driving-it-to-the-bitter-end.html.

And, that at 75 mph, Leaf should average 3.0 miles/kWh and thus go 62 miles until dead.

Don't worry about battery gids. Those are what folks had to do with '11 and '12 Leafs which didn't have a % SoC display, only a GOM and 12 fuel bars. Gids were more granular and didn't have the black box adjustments applied by the GOM. People could use this is a proxy for % SoC.

The 12 down to 1 referred to the 12 "fuel bars", of which Bolt has 20.

Would be nice to have a similar chart for Bolt, or if nothing else the calculations for a full battery and "full" charge w/hill top reserved turned on.

Folks have probably seen these blog entries by Tesla: https://www.tesla.com/blog/model-s-efficiency-and-range and https://web.archive.org/web/20100721110430/http://www.teslamotors.com/blog/roadster-efficiency-and-range/.
 

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Welcome aboard! I have made 11 trips of over 400 miles (longest 1 day trip was 520 miles) and find that it simply takes more planning. As we have NO CCS DCFC in the entire state, it is an exercise just to get to that first one in a neighboring state! Four times I overnighted at ~ the 200-230 mile mark. On the others, I simply plan a meal while the DCFC hums. I have never had to wait more than 20 minutes over my "meal time". I agree that many (most?) Bolt purchasers are using it as a commuter car that they only need to charge every 4-5 days, but I have never had to rent an ICEV in nearly 2 years.
I was looking at Plugshare recently just seeing if I could drive the Bolt on a road trip from NH to CO where my in-laws live. (Moved from CO and love the state, so other reasons to go there as well.:D) I also noticed a huge desert of DCFC right over WV. Have some Level 2 units there, but the entire state just doesn't have any DCFC. What is up with that? Now, in the mid-west I can understand, but WV?
 

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I was looking at Plugshare recently just seeing if I could drive the Bolt on a road trip from NH to CO where my in-laws live. (Moved from CO and love the state, so other reasons to go there as well.:D) I also noticed a huge desert of DCFC right over WV. Have some Level 2 units there, but the entire state just doesn't have any DCFC. What is up with that? Now, in the mid-west I can understand, but WV?

Plenty of Tesla Supercharger plugs (>40) but NO SAE CCS DCFC. Since I do not use the CHAdeMO plug, I don't keep up on it. We have plenty of Level 2 "destination chargers", good for overnight and emergency charges. We also have LOTS of NEMA 14-50 plugs (mostly at KoA Kampgrounds, but also at RV parks throughout the state). If your home Level 2 EVSE is portable like mine (Siemens Versicharge) is, you can utilize this factor.

We are a vast CCS wasteland (a veritable doughnut hole of no EVSE surrounded by MD, VA, KY, OH, & PA). I keep telling the State government how many tourist dollars they are missing, but, so far, to no avail. On a trip as long as you are proposing, I would stay north in PA & OH. I-70 will keep you charged, while I-64 will not.

Happy motoring!
 
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