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I've had FF's that torque steer since forever. Never thought it was worth mentioning since its not a big deal. FWD is so boring without the tail trying to swing around, at least torque steer gives you a little something to do. Delightfully surprised to see all the agreement here.. usually all you hear is from the other side complaining about it.

I floor it in the rain. Sometimes spin the tires in the rain. Its not a problem, the car is very well behaved.
 

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I think it is fair to say no one hated GM more than I did ten years ago...I drove Saabs until GM ruined them and killed the brand, but I think the Volt and the Bolt have them on the road to redemption. If you want torque steer try a 9-3 Saab Viggen. I have always loved FWD sports car and sometimes pretend there is a bit of Saab DNA in my Bolt.
 

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I just tested my 2019 Bolt EV LT for torque steer. Flat road, stopped, Sport mode. I floored it, chirped the front tires, and ran it up to 150 kW power draw. The car did not pull in either direction. I think people who are reporting “torque steer” are really seeing traction loss on one front wheel.
 

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This is interesting. My 17 torque steers so much I’m nearly afraid to floor from a stand still. It practically jumps sideways. I’ve never noticed any alignment problems such as tire ware at 20,000mi or a misaligned steering wheel. I’d does, however pull sidesways a bit, but it just seems to very sensitive to road crowning.

Any thoughts?
That sounds like an alignment issue.
 

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I just tested my 2019 Bolt EV LT for torque steer. Flat road, stopped, Sport mode. I floored it, chirped the front tires, and ran it up to 150 kW power draw. The car did not pull in either direction. I think people who are reporting “torque steer” are really seeing traction loss on one front wheel.

Try doing the same on an extended wet surface. I guarantee you'll experience it. Yes, the torque steer is a result of loss of traction in one tire, then the other tire, then the original tire and so forth.
 

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I just tested my 2019 Bolt EV LT for torque steer. Flat road, stopped, Sport mode. I floored it, chirped the front tires, and ran it up to 150 kW power draw. The car did not pull in either direction. I think people who are reporting “torque steer” are really seeing traction loss on one front wheel.
Try doing it while moving from one camber to another, for example, while overtaking on a part of a road with significant camber in both directions - a crowned road. Parsing the term "torque steer" to define it as only on a dead flat road and from a dead stop is disingenuous. Also, you don't need to "floor it" to achieve the effect many of us are talking about. Simply demanding enough power to safely overtake another car is sufficient. The only caveat I can add is that my Bolt is a 2017, so I could not possibly comment authoritatively on a 2019 model.
 

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Try doing it while moving from one camber to another, for example, while overtaking on a part of a road with significant camber in both directions - a crowned road. Parsing the term "torque steer" to define it as only on a dead flat road and from a dead stop is disingenuous. Also, you don't need to "floor it" to achieve the effect many of us are talking about. Simply demanding enough power to safely overtake another car is sufficient. The only caveat I can add is that my Bolt is a 2017, so I could not possibly comment authoritatively on a 2019 model.
I would say it's more disingenuous to expand the definition of torque steer beyond its original meaning. What you're saying is that same as if you hit a patch of ice with one tire and lose traction, it's "torque steer." The definition of torque steer is when the car, under otherwise normal conditions, changes its direction as the result of applying power, so variations in the road cannot (by definition) cause torque steer.
 

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I would say it's more disingenuous to expand the definition of torque steer beyond its original meaning. What you're saying is that same as if you hit a patch of ice with one tire and lose traction, it's "torque steer." The definition of torque steer is when the car, under otherwise normal conditions, changes its direction as the result of applying power, so variations in the road cannot (by definition) cause torque steer.
Depends on the amount of torque steer. If torque steer is present, then it may not appear under all conditions, or it may appear in conditions that would be exacerbated by torque steer. It exists on the Bolt, as various reviewers and users have reported on here and elsewhere. The exact conditions to make it happen are not hard to find.
 

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Depends on the amount of torque steer. If torque steer is present, then it may not appear under all conditions, or it may appear in conditions that would be exacerbated by torque steer. It exists on the Bolt, as various reviewers and users have reported on here and elsewhere. The exact conditions to make it happen are not hard to find.
Well, there are a few things to consider:

First, if someone is experiencing torque steer in the Bolt EV, they are likely suffering from an alignment issue or a tire issue.

Second, most of the "reviewers" I've heard referencing "torque steer" seemed to be describing under steer more than torque steer (or at least, they didn't seem to understand the difference between the two).

Finally, because of the decreased level of accountability on the internet, we see a number of people echo received opinions without fully understanding what they've heard or without any actual first-hand experiences related to the topic.
 

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The article said that the Bolt frame was based upon the Sonic.

That does not make sense. I thought that I read that the Bolt EV was close to, if not identical to the Cadillac CT6. I sure know that, when parked side by side, there is very little difference between the Caddy and the Bolt. Only the overly large Caddy grill looks different.

So, does anyone know? A Sonic or a Caddy?
 

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The article said that the Bolt frame was based upon the Sonic.

That does not make sense. I thought that I read that the Bolt EV was close to, if not identical to the Cadillac CT6. I sure know that, when parked side by side, there is very little difference between the Caddy and the Bolt. Only the overly large Caddy grill looks different.

So, does anyone know? A Sonic or a Caddy?
The Bolt EV is based on the BEV2 platform that (according to Josh Tavel) does not share components with the Gamma 2 platform used in the Sonic. So yes, that is an incorrect statement. The misconception probably finds it's roots in the fact that the Bolt EV shares an assembly line with the Sonic.

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/gm-platforms/gm-bev-2-platform/
 

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The Bolt EV is based on the BEV2 platform that (according to Josh Tavel) does not share components with the Gamma 2 platform used in the Sonic. So yes, that is an incorrect statement. The misconception probably finds it's roots in the fact that the Bolt EV shares an assembly line with the Sonic.

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/gm-platforms/gm-bev-2-platform/
I am sure that the article writer would have hated to admit the Caddy relationship. Going with the Sonic analogy, he was able to do yet another put down.

As others have noted, his review is filled with "fake news".
 
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