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Discussion Starter #1
I switched from 6 years of driving a Nissan Leaf to a 2017 Bolt.

Questions:
Is there any display that actually shows the percentage of battery remaining?

What is the consensus re: fully charging it every night?

Thanks.

PeterD
 

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I switched from 6 years of driving a Nissan Leaf to a 2017 Bolt.

Questions:
Is there any display that actually shows the percentage of battery remaining?

What is the consensus re: fully charging it every night?

Thanks.

PeterD
Welcome!

You can get a rough percentage by counting the number of bars on the left hand side of the DIC (instrument cluster screen). Each green bar represents 5%. There's white tick marks at the 25, 50 and 75 percent levels. A more exact percentage number can be gotten from the myChevrolet app, either via OnStar or KeyPass.

Most of us seem to use Hilltop a Reserve, which charges it to between 86% and 90%, and plug in every night to charge. Advantage of it is that the car is always charged in the morning, and with Hilltop Reserve on, you have full regenerative braking available. I only charge to 100% if going on a trip where I think I will need all of the range (only needed 3 times so far). Advantage of plugging it in each night is the ability to use preconditioning with little to no impact on range.
 

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Remote start. Aka warming-up/cooling-down the interior before driving off.
Once again, I learn something new. I had thought that "pre-conditioning" meant only activity you do to the battery (warming when cold and cooling when warm). I thought heating/cooling the car interior was just a range preserver if you used house energy while still being plugged in. You can pre-condition your battery for longer range even without being plugged in, as batteries at "normal" temperature are much more efficient at giving up their electrons.

Alas, devbolt shows why he is "da man" and sets me straight. The two references I checked confirmed his explanation and minimized (but did not ignore) the impact on battery performance. I be one step wiser and two steps older today.
 

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Once again, I learn something new. I had thought that "pre-conditioning" meant only activity you do to the battery (warming when cold and cooling when warm). I thought heating/cooling the car interior was just a range preserver if you used house energy while still being plugged in. You can pre-condition your battery for longer range even without being plugged in, as batteries at "normal" temperature are much more efficient at giving up their electrons.

Alas, devbolt shows why he is "da man" and sets me straight. The two references I checked confirmed his explanation and minimized (but did not ignore) the impact on battery performance. I be one step wiser and two steps older today.
Oh stop it, you're gonna make me blush. :)

I seem to have an ability to keep all sorts of weird minutiae in my head. And I'm happy to pass on that knowledge, some of which I gained from others. I learn a lot from reading these types of forums.
 
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