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As part of the recently passed Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, two new electric vehicle programs will receive funds.

The National Electric Vehicle Program, or EV Charging Program, will provide funding to the States to strategically deploy EV charging infrastructure.

DOT’s Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) posted a request for information in the Federal Register, to invite public comments that will inform program guidance development.


Add your comments here

Regulations.gov

Read more details here
New National Electric Vehicle Programs Release Requests for Information

Comments for consideration
  • Required up time, published reliability and status (phone app, web)
  • Ways to initiate a charge, payment etc... (Note, if you require a card reader that will exclude Tesla superchargers opening to non-Tesla EV's without card reader terminal retrofit)
  • Location determination
 

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Great, and anti-EV states will put all the chargers at one spot, in the middle of nowhere.
 

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Great, and anti-EV states will put all the chargers at one spot, in the middle of nowhere.
No they won't. They'll put fast chargers where it's easy and useless, like at Targets and grocery stores in the middle of the city. Middle of nowhere is where they're needed!

I left my comment:

"Ask Tesla what to do"
 

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No they won't. They'll put fast chargers where it's easy and useless, like at Targets and grocery stores in the middle of the city. Middle of nowhere is where they're needed!

I left my comment:

"Ask Tesla what to do"
Not if it's out of reach as in 1000 miles from the nearest charger. Imagine TN use all the funds to make a charging hub in the middle of the vast forest. The only people who can use it are the anti-govt, anti EV crowd who won't use it. LOL
 

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No they won't. They'll put fast chargers where it's easy and useless, like at Targets and grocery stores in the middle of the city. Middle of nowhere is where they're needed!
There is a school of that that this would be a great idea. If you live in a place where you can't charge at home, charging while shopping is a great option. It would open up EV ownership to apartment dwellers for who EV ownership now isn't practical.
 

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EV fast chargers at Interstate Highway rest stops. In cities it would be much cheaper to install 1450 outlets anywhere cars normally park and let the cars use their own portable charge cable. At homes, smart meters with demand control will be needed along with real time pricing and all cars must be capable of vehicle to grid in order to serve double duty as grid storage.
 

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Fast chargers at every rest top on the Interstate Highway
With easy access to a snack machine and a pop machine behind iron bars.
And don't forget the smelly, scary restrooms.
No Thank You.

Play plan a trip on Abetterrouteplanner, using a Bolt.
They are very near the highway exits, (usually), and near a place to sit, eat, potty.
Why not expand on this system that EA and others have pioneered?
 

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I never see any people at the high speed chargers in Austin. One of the most EV government loving bunch of #$^^&#$$ on the planet. The reason is that here, most people with an EV have access to very cheap home charging. The only reason I was at them was because it was free and I had time. Otherwise it's silly to charge in a city unless some direct reason to go there. I'd charge outside a Walmart and run in and shop if I needed something. Hopefully Home Depot will start to deploy chargers in pull trough spots for truck use.

The place EV DC Level 3 charging is needed is in the middle of nowhere or at least some thought out main routes. If one searches for Tesla only chargers on plugshare they find them well spaced. Many of them are in places that don't have easy access to other amenities.
 

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EV fast chargers at Interstate Highway rest stops. In cities it would be much cheaper to install 1450 outlets anywhere cars normally park and let the cars use their own portable charge cable. At homes, smart meters with demand control will be needed along with real time pricing and all cars must be capable of vehicle to grid in order to serve double duty as grid storage.
If you add up the time, cars parked at home and at work accounts for 90% of the parking time of a car. Anywhere else, there simply isn't enough time to get a decent charge.

At home and work in a shared environment, there's always going to be the allocation problem where there is a mismatch between the number of charging spots and the number of EVs. Either too many EVs and not enough chargers, or vice versa where charging spots go wasted.

The solution for this is mixing in faster charging options. Not necessarily 350 kW ultra fast charging, but 30,50, 72 kW charging options that can be installed and operated cheaper than ultra high speed travel chargers.

Cheap charging isn't the sole driver of a solution. Effective charging is. And locally outside of the home, faster charging options that can be shared in the timeframes that people speed at groceries, gyms, coffee shops, and strip malls would be the most effective deployment for local charging. It also works for shared situations such as apartments/condos and workplaces.

ga2500ev
 

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I never see any people at the high speed chargers in Austin. One of the most EV government loving bunch of #$^^&#$$ on the planet. The reason is that here, most people with an EV have access to very cheap home charging. The only reason I was at them was because it was free and I had time. Otherwise it's silly to charge in a city unless some direct reason to go there. I'd charge outside a Walmart and run in and shop if I needed something. Hopefully Home Depot will start to deploy chargers in pull trough spots for truck use.

The place EV DC Level 3 charging is needed is in the middle of nowhere or at least some thought out main routes. If one searches for Tesla only chargers on plugshare they find them well spaced. Many of them are in places that don't have easy access to other amenities.
Some of this is based on the fact that EV owners are a self selecting demographic. And it's a demographic that almost to a person has easy and dedicated access to home charging.

We recently bought a VW ID.4 as my wife's new daily driver. She was almost giddy at the prospect of 3 years free fast charging at Electrify America and had it clearly planned that she would stop at the station between home and work at the Target to get her free electrons. That plan lasted all of two weeks. Like all the rest of us, she now pulls into the carport and plugs into the EVSE there. The convenience outdueled the potential savings,

But the next wave may not have that level of access. For example my daughter lives in a condo complex with zero charging stations at the moment. In addition to more widespread travel routes, there needs to be a system of urban/suburban charging stations for folks who will not have easy access at home. And it must be a mix of L2 and faster DCFC options so that folks can pick the type of charging they have the money and time to afford at the time. In addition it creates a visibility that eliminates that innate charging anxiety. People pass gas stations every day that they never ever use. But just knowing they are there gives them comfort. We need the same type of infrastructure for charging stations in every local environment.

ga2500ev
 

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"A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates that 3.4 DCFC, and 40 Level 2 charging ports are needed per 1,000 EVs. Assuming 35 million EVs by 2030, the U.S. will need to build about 50,000 DCFCs and 1.2 million Level 2 ports. This means that 380 EV charging ports will need to be installed each day over the next nine years! In comparison, the U.S. has installed on average about 30 ports a day between 2010 and 2020.

How much will this cost? Building an EV charging station is expensive because of installation costs and specialized hardware. Installation involves permitting and grid connections which may require additional distribution grid upgrades. Together, hardware and installation could cost as much as $4,500 per Level 1 port, $20,000 per Level 2 port, and $90,000 per DCFC."
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A large majority of the level 2 charging at homes, apartment complexes, and at work parking lots could be simply 1450 outlets, at 1/10 of the price of a commercial charge station, if we would implement overtheair billing in the cars for the energy used based on location. This also would be much more robust in eliminating inoperative charge stations. (It's hard to damage a 1450 receptacle)
 

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1."A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates that 3.4 DCFC, and 40 Level 2 charging ports are needed per 1,000 EVs. ...

2.How much will this cost?... Together, hardware and installation could cost as much as $4,500 per Level 1 port, $20,000 per Level 2 port, and $90,000 per DCFC."

3.A large majority of the level 2 charging at homes, apartment complexes, and at work parking lots could be simply [NEMA]1450 outlets, at 1/10 of the price of a commercial charge station,.....
1. These guys can calculate stuff like this.

2. These guys.... this is BS. Why would slightly thicker wires for an L2 and the EVSE installation go from "$4500 for an L1 to $20,000 for an L2 ?
DCFC units themselves have to be coming down in price. Getting the bigazz 3ph wiring to each installation varies a lot, I would imagine.

3. So true! But repeatedly handling a portable L2 is a hassle and what about theft?
Networked L2's have to coming down in price as well.
In car SW for billing would work. Good luck getting that updated on an older EV (Bolt).
 

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"A study by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory estimates that 3.4 DCFC, and 40 Level 2 charging ports are needed per 1,000 EVs. Assuming 35 million EVs by 2030, the U.S. will need to build about 50,000 DCFCs and 1.2 million Level 2 ports. This means that 380 EV charging ports will need to be installed each day over the next nine years! In comparison, the U.S. has installed on average about 30 ports a day between 2010 and 2020.

How much will this cost? Building an EV charging station is expensive because of installation costs and specialized hardware. Installation involves permitting and grid connections which may require additional distribution grid upgrades. Together, hardware and installation could cost as much as $4,500 per Level 1 port, $20,000 per Level 2 port, and $90,000 per DCFC."
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A large majority of the level 2 charging at homes, apartment complexes, and at work parking lots could be simply 1450 outlets, at 1/10 of the price of a commercial charge station, if we would implement overtheair billing in the cars for the energy used based on location. This also would be much more robust in eliminating inoperative charge stations. (It's hard to damage a 1450 receptacle)
The good news is that according to EV Hub (Atlas Policy), of the $3B VW Settlement Funds awarded to states via the Environmental Mitigation Trust Fund, only 21% has been allocated to date (EDIT: As of 7/2020). This money is on top of the $2B Electrify America investment requirement. Interestingly, California has yet to allocate any of the $422M awarded to them.

To put that in perspective, with $7B being added in the recent legislation, it seems promising that future infrastructure supply will stay ahead of demand.

My opinion is, public charging in its current state is somewhat overbuilt in many areas. Granted, this observation is anecdotal based on observations that it is rare for more than 25% of plugs being in use at most public DCFC sites at a given time. And yes, there are isolated incidents of shortages, predominantly at Tesla Superchargers on holiday weekends, but these are not as common as day to day low utilization rates. Also, there are places like WV where public charging is woefully inadequate. On the whole though, we may currently be a bit ahead of the curve.

Another observation I have concluded is that Tesla SC sites are far and away higher utilization than CCS. This is partly due to over 70% of EV nationwide being Tesla, but also partly due to lifetime free SC charging grated to early adopters. Several of the long-time Tesla owners I know rely on free SC in place of home charging. Assuming Tesla is able to swing some of the public funds for expansion of their network, it may be adequate to keep up with demand, but the free SC charging benefit might get squeezed if demand grows faster than supply. Opening SC sites up to CCS could accelerate a demand squeeze. Fortunately, many of the lifetime free Teslas will be traded in for newer models and lose this benefit. But, will Tesla be forced to expire the free charging benefit at some point?

With the vast majority of EV charging occurring at home, the biggest need is probably in the area of multi-family dwelling sites. This is a difficult nut to crack, but one that promises to open the floodgates when landlords and condo associations embrace the idea of providing charging options for residents. I seem to recall over 50% of residents live in single family homes, over 70% in my area. Surely, many urban areas are weighted more heavily towards multi-family residents. Over time, if landlords and associations embrace EV charging like other trends (units equipped with modern appliances, internet, etc), much of this need would be addressed with private funds in order to attract residents.

My other observation is, EV adoption at the current 2-3% levels may be insufficient to sustain existing public charging profitably. It seems few (if any) public charging networks operate profitably at the current state. Again, it seems we are currently overbuilt and yet we are ready to more than double the investment in infrastructure. If that investment is the carrot that leads more drivers to choose EV, then the rapid growth in EV market share should soon catch up with supply. With a number of EV charging networks going public (EVGO, ChargePoint, Blink), shareholders will be watching profitability and urging more private investments as profits rise. I wonder if EA will go public once the $2B investment cycles are completed?

At the end of the day, I expect public funding to be viewed through the lens of history as seed money to stimulate EV adoption. I expect private businesses will take things to the next level and reduce the need to rely on public assistance.

With Utilities already involved in nearly 40% of existing and planned public chargers (per EV Hub), and a growing number of utilities engaging in Smart Charging initiatives and incentives, I am confident the utility infrastructure will keep pace with demand. They faced a similar demand surge when Air Conditioning came on the scene, then demand declined as efficiency improved. Surely, the utilities are watching for demand increases from the EV trends, and will find ways to meet the demand.

To your point about multifamily needs being addressed with outlets vs EVSEs, I agree. I would add, 5-15R could even solve the problem for a great number of potential EV owners given national averages for commuting being less than 40 miles a day. If workplaces also embrace at least Level 1 charging, coupled with Level 1 at home, nearly all of the demand could be met. A few Level 2 outlets or EVSEs at each site to supplement the Level 1 may be all that is needed to adequately address the needs of all.

Edit: Clarified the 21% settlement fund allocation is as of July 2020.
 

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The form says "Do not submit personally identifiable information through this form. Any personally identifiable information " and yet the First and Last Name are required fields.
 

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...Another observation I have concluded is that Tesla SC sites are far and away higher utilization than CCS.
This is partly due to over 70% of EV nationwide being Tesla, but also partly due to lifetime free SC charging grated to early adopters. Several of the long-time Tesla owners I know .
This makes sense. 70%, well duh...
What's the make up of the CCS equipped EV's?
Is there data on CCS station utilization?

And good on the lifetime free SC owners! I knew that would be a bargain for some Tesla owners!
Remember when elon was going on about 'some owners 'abusing' the free SC benefit'?
How could that even be done? A deals a deal, pal.... (y)
 

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The form says "Do not submit personally identifiable information through this form. Any personally identifiable information " and yet the First and Last Name are required fields.
Easy. 101.
Don't give them your real name, Xaiver Onasis
 

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The good news is that according to EV Hub (Atlas Policy), of the $3B VW Settlement Funds awarded to states via the Environmental Mitigation Trust Fund, only 21% has been allocated to date (EDIT: As of 7/2020). This money is on top of the $2B Electrify America investment requirement....
Dang, well let's get after it! What are we waiting for?
Let's put people to work on ushering in the clean energy future!

It's amazing how far along it is right now!
I was daydreaming on EBRP.
KC to Key West!
1646 miles. 27 hrs driving. 11 hrs of charging at 16 charge stops. Longest stop 56 mins.
Who says you can't road trip a Bolt? ;)
 

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The form says "Do not submit personally identifiable information through this form. Any personally identifiable information " and yet the First and Last Name are required fields.
Government. :rolleyes:
I just used the initial for my last name and it was okay with that.
 
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