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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Frozen tundra here, so no plug behind the dryer. My probable solution is much easier. I have what I think is 240 volt service in the garage that was designated for a welder. The power is there. I just need adapters and to make sure everything is up to code.
 

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Frozen tundra here, so no plug behind the dryer. My probable solution is much easier. I have what I think is 240 volt service in the garage that was designated for a welder. The power is there. I just need adapters and to make sure everything is up to code.
Start with the plug type:
36136

Next, confirm the Amps on the breaker in the main panel for that circuit.

Often, welders are NEMA 6-30, or 6-50. These should be easy to find adapters for. If it is the circular plug L6-x, may be trickier. I think the circular plugs are older style that went out of favor years ago?

Remember, the charger should not exceed 80% of the rated capacity of the circuit.
 

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Start with the plug type:
View attachment 36136
Next, confirm the Amps on the breaker in the main panel for that circuit.

Often, welders are NEMA 6-30, or 6-50. These should be easy to find adapters for. If it is the circular plug L6-x, may be trickier. I think the circular plugs are older style that went out of favor years ago?

Remember, the charger should not exceed 80% of the rated capacity of the circuit.
L6-x plugs are still available at Home Depot, for making your own. The beauty of the locking plugs is that connections won't pull apart without extraordinary force.
 

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The 2017 Bolt has a 60 kWh battery. The on-board charger was built to accept the maximum AC (Alternating Current) charging power of 7.2 kW, which means that when connected to a home charger with a power rating above 7.2 kW, the Bolt will only be capable of accepting up to 7.2 kW.

1. It seems that you prefer to get a Level 2 home charger.

2. If you just are going to own only one EV, Bolt, you should get a Level 2 home charger that comes with a power rating of around 7.2 kW, that is, 32 amps.

But if you plan to get more EVs in the future, a higher powered home charger would be more suitable for you. ChargePoint Home Flex, JuiceBox charger, Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger are all good picks. There are in-depth reviews about these chargers on this website.

You can also use this cost to charge an electric car calculator to see how much money monthly or yearly you can save by taking advantage of off-peak electricity.

3. In my opinion, a plug-in version is enough because hardwiring could cost you some money.

In addition, hardwired charging stations are permanently connected to the electricity supply, which could be an issue if you have to move a lot.

A plug-in unit isn’t permanently installed and you can hardwire it if you’d like to.

4. https://smartchargeamerica.com/ This website offers related service. Consult them first if you need a service panel upgrade.

Hope this helps!
 

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The 2017 Bolt has a 60 kWh battery. The on-board charger was built to accept the maximum AC (Alternating Current) charging power of 7.2 kW, which means that when connected to a home charger with a power rating above 7.2 kW, the Bolt will only be capable of accepting up to 7.2 kW.

1. It seems that you prefer to get a Level 2 home charger.

2. If you just are going to own only one EV, Bolt, you should get a Level 2 home charger that comes with a power rating of around 7.2 kW, that is, 32 amps.

But if you plan to get more EVs in the future, a higher powered home charger would be more suitable for you. ChargePoint Home Flex, JuiceBox charger, Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger are all good picks. There are in-depth reviews about these chargers on this website.

You can also use this cost to charge an electric car calculator to see how much money monthly or yearly you can save by taking advantage of off-peak electricity.

3. In my opinion, a plug-in version is enough because hardwiring could cost you some money.

In addition, hardwired charging stations are permanently connected to the electricity supply, which could be an issue if you have to move a lot.

A plug-in unit isn’t permanently installed and you can hardwire it if you’d like to.

4. https://smartchargeamerica.com/ This website offers related service. Consult them first if you need a service panel upgrade.

Hope this helps!
Does the 2022 Bolt charge faster at home?If so can i upgrade my 2021 to have that benefit?
 

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The 2017 Bolt has a 60 kWh battery. The on-board charger was built to accept the maximum AC (Alternating Current) charging power of 7.2 kW, which means that when connected to a home charger with a power rating above 7.2 kW, the Bolt will only be capable of accepting up to 7.2 kW.

1. It seems that you prefer to get a Level 2 home charger.

2. If you just are going to own only one EV, Bolt, you should get a Level 2 home charger that comes with a power rating of around 7.2 kW, that is, 32 amps.

But if you plan to get more EVs in the future, a higher powered home charger would be more suitable for you. ChargePoint Home Flex, JuiceBox charger, Wallbox Pulsar Plus charger are all good picks. There are in-depth reviews about these chargers on this website.

You can also use this cost to charge an electric car calculator to see how much money monthly or yearly you can save by taking advantage of off-peak electricity.

3. In my opinion, a plug-in version is enough because hardwiring could cost you some money.

In addition, hardwired charging stations are permanently connected to the electricity supply, which could be an issue if you have to move a lot.

A plug-in unit isn’t permanently installed and you can hardwire it if you’d like to.

4. https://smartchargeamerica.com/ This website offers related service. Consult them first if you need a service panel upgrade.

Hope this helps!
I would take issue with a few of these points. Not that the points are wrong, just adding a bit more to consider.

First, check with your utility company, many offer rebates on specific EVSEs. Some on installation costs too.

Second, IRS offered (may still this year) a 30% credit for install and equipment costs for alt energy vehicle fueling (charging) purchases.

Third, if 32A is adequate for your current situation, even a higher powered EV in the future would top off adequately at 32A unless it is infinitely less efficient and uses more kWh for the same use conditions. My 130 mile commute generally takes 3-4 hours to replenish daily, an EV that is less efficient might take 5-6 hours, but still complete in the 10-12 hours it is parked overnight.

Last, hardwired can be disconnected, but you have to be comfortable working with wiring, or willing to hire an electrician down the road. Install cost initially may be less (no plugs and outlets), but if you are not comfy with high voltage wiring, future electrician visits will add up. The biggest + for plug in units is portability and exchange. If the unit fails, easier to unplug and return than remove wiring. If you move, easier to take with you. If you travel to off the beaten path locations, it can be brought along to charge at RV parks.
 

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Yes 2022's can take up to 11.2 kW which is 48 amps. No, 2021's cannot be retrofitted.
Not sure if 'cannot' is accurate, but impractical surely.

The outlet is likely fine, and the wiring harness may be ok with higher amps (unsure). But the AC-DC inverter would need to be upgraded (reasonable to assume this is possible), and the BMS may need to be re-programmed (this may be a sticking point if 2022 software is a completely different build, 2021 may not have the option).

Assuming one could make an upgrade, what would be the point? Very few users need 11kW AC charging for overnight, about the only benefit would be if the Bolt is not DCFC equipped, or for short overnight charging windows with a high daily use case.

I doubt GM would consider making a modification available that was only useful in rare cases.
 

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Not sure if 'cannot' is accurate, but impractical surely.

The outlet is likely fine, and the wiring harness may be ok with higher amps (unsure). But the AC-DC inverter would need to be upgraded (reasonable to assume this is possible), and the BMS may need to be re-programmed (this may be a sticking point if 2022 software is a completely different build, 2021 may not have the option).

Assuming one could make an upgrade, what would be the point? Very few users need 11kW AC charging for overnight, about the only benefit would be if the Bolt is not DCFC equipped, or for short overnight charging windows with a high daily use case.

I doubt GM would consider making a modification available that was only useful in rare cases.
Should just need to replace OBC, no need to reprogram BMS as it is already able to accept 55KW, well below 12KW.
 

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Should just need to replace OBC, no need to reprogram BMS as it is already able to accept 55KW, well below 12KW.
Maybe, but the BMS code might set limits on the AC-DC inverter for Control Pilot signaling. It likely has some role given the scheduling and 8\12A L1 setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Follow up question. I found a setting that controls the portable cord limit. 8 or 12 amps. Which should I use?
IMG_20210720_105710741.jpg
 

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That setting is only pertinent to 120V charging. At 240V, it will go for as much as it can get from the EVSE.

On 120V, you be the judge. Most circuits are 15A, so 12A is safe. But, old wiring, or circuits shared with other stuff that uses a decent amount of power will get frustrating with 12A setting, repeated circuit breaker trips. That is the circuit protecting you from worse things.

In most cases, it would be safe to try 12A, but in older homes (40+ years without wiring updates), more caution might be warranted. That is why GM chose 8A as default.
 

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Does the 2022 Bolt charge faster at home?If so can i upgrade my 2021 to have that benefit?
2022 Bolt:

Battery: 65 kWh

On-board Charger: 11 kW (32-amp Level 2 home charger)

Expected EPA range: 259 miles


2021 Bolt:

Battery: 65 kWh

On-board charger: 7.2 kW (48-amp Level 2 home charger)

Expected EPA range: 259 miles


Yes. The 2022 Bolt charges faster if you use a 48-amp Level 2 charger.

I’m not sure if the 2021 Bolt can be upgrade to enjoy that benefit. But I don’t think it’s necessary to do that.

I used this charging time calculator and got around 26 miles per hour of charging if you use a 32-amp charger on your 2021 Bolt. While it’s approximately 40 miles of range per hour of charging with a 48-amp charger on the 2022 Bolt.

If you drive your Bolt mainly for daily commutes (30 miles on average), a 32-amp charger might be all you need for regular daily charging.

Of course, if you do real estate or if you do kind of business where you’re going back and forth to your house, and you’re constantly running errands, a bit of an edge of about 10 or 14 miles of range more per hour may make a difference.

So whether you need to charge your Bolt faster or not depends on many different variables, such as how often you drive, how far you drive, how much battery you need each morning when you wake up, etc.
 

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I would take issue with a few of these points. Not that the points are wrong, just adding a bit more to consider.

First, check with your utility company, many offer rebates on specific EVSEs. Some on installation costs too.

Second, IRS offered (may still this year) a 30% credit for install and equipment costs for alt energy vehicle fueling (charging) purchases.

Third, if 32A is adequate for your current situation, even a higher powered EV in the future would top off adequately at 32A unless it is infinitely less efficient and uses more kWh for the same use conditions. My 130 mile commute generally takes 3-4 hours to replenish daily, an EV that is less efficient might take 5-6 hours, but still complete in the 10-12 hours it is parked overnight.

Last, hardwired can be disconnected, but you have to be comfortable working with wiring, or willing to hire an electrician down the road. Install cost initially may be less (no plugs and outlets), but if you are not comfy with high voltage wiring, future electrician visits will add up. The biggest + for plug in units is portability and exchange. If the unit fails, easier to unplug and return than remove wiring. If you move, easier to take with you. If you travel to off the beaten path locations, it can be brought along to charge at RV parks.
Indeed, many states offer tax credits, incentives, rebates on EV charging stations and their installation.

https://plugstar.com/tools/incentives This website can help us find our electric car incentives.
 

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2022 Bolt:

Battery: 65 kWh

On-board Charger: 11 kW (32-amp Level 2 home charger)

Expected EPA range: 259 miles


2021 Bolt:

Battery: 65 kWh

On-board charger: 7.2 kW (48-amp Level 2 home charger)

Expected EPA range: 259 miles


Yes. The 2022 Bolt charges faster if you use a 48-amp Level 2 charger.

I’m not sure if the 2021 Bolt can be upgrade to enjoy that benefit. But I don’t think it’s necessary to do that.

I used this charging time calculator and got around 26 miles per hour of charging if you use a 32-amp charger on your 2021 Bolt. While it’s approximately 40 miles of range per hour of charging with a 48-amp charger on the 2022 Bolt.

If you drive your Bolt mainly for daily commutes (30 miles on average), a 32-amp charger might be all you need for regular daily charging.

Of course, if you do real estate or if you do kind of business where you’re going back and forth to your house, and you’re constantly running errands, a bit of an edge of about 10 or 14 miles of range more per hour may make a difference.

So whether you need to charge your Bolt faster or not depends on many different variables, such as how often you drive, how far you drive, how much battery you need each morning when you wake up, etc.
Thank you for the info.My question was if it changed anything on 120volts.For the time being 120 volts does the job
 

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I'm in the market for a Bolt, probably going to get a used 2017. I'm trying to figure out my charging plan. I have an electrician coming tomorrow to look into what I would need for a level 2 charger in my garage. I have a few questions for those with more experience.

1. Do I even need a level 2 charger? I'd like to have one in case I run low on charge and am short on time, but the slow level 1 charge will be fine for 95% or more of my needs. There are some fast charging stations in my area but a home charger wound be more convenient.

2. Which charger should I get? I expect that a charger will come with the car but I assume there are better ones out there. I'd like to have something that connects to WiFi or has an app that lets me control what time it charges so I can take advantage of off peak electricity.

3. Should I get one hard wired or something I can plug in? Not sure if there are advantages one way or the other.

4. Any ideas on finding electricians who have done this before? I'm not sure how common this is in my area yet and I don't see electricians advertising home chargers as a service. I looked into going through Qmerit since I saw they help with charger installation on new Bolt purchases, but they want a deposit (refundable) just to finish the estimate.

Thanks.
I have a 20 amp. 110 voltt outlet and my 2020 Bolt has the option to charge at 8 amps or 12 amps. With a 20 amp outlet at 12 amps, charging overnight covers all my needs for 40 to 60 miles.
 
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