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Just bought a used 2018 LT with less than 10,000 miles, for ~$22,000 OTD in Houston TX. Apparently it was a lease return from the Bay Area in CA.

I love this car! I am no tree hugger, but the practicality and economy of this car looks to be amazing, and my other car is a Toyota RAV4 hybrid! I was so proud of myself for getting that car, as I expected it to be the most economical car I ever owned (42 mpg!). I was pretty happy with that purchase (still am, as a car for the minor hauling chores I might have and for road trips), but my Bolt seems just amazing. I call my Bolt my Chevy Tesla, and my RAV4 my Prius SUV. Wow!

As a newbie, what should I be sure to address, or what maintenance do you see as critical? What habits are best to insure long battery life (as opposed to long range...I want this car to last for more than 100,000 miles)? All advice appreciated. I expect that most days, the car may see 20-50 miles a day; occasionally more, never challenging the total range of the battery. I only have the Level 1 charger but can use it at the 12 amp setting. So far I have not used it enough to fail to fully charge (hilltop mode, although I live in a very flat area) overnight. Also, I don’t fully understand the “hill top mode” setting, so any explanation of the optimal use of that would be appreciated.
 

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Also, I don’t fully understand the “hill top mode” setting, so any explanation of the optimal use of that would be appreciated.
Welcome aboard. And yes, I love this car too.

Hill top mode allows you to charge to 88-90% of usable capacity without having to stop the charge manually, or have a smart EVSE in your garage to stop it for you. The stated idea is to allow full regenerative braking for those who live at the top of a big hill. It does in fact accomplish that. The other reason is to extend battery life. But car companies are loathe to suggest that is advantageous. GM expanded this feature in 2019, as I recall, to 5% increments down to 40%. I hope my bringing it up doesn't start another long, boring discussion. Please search the forum for many pages on this subject.
 

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Welcome. Former Hybrid owners here too, my gateway drug was Ford Fusion Hybrid (2103) which served me well for 5 years\150k miles and is now 2.5 years into service for my son (hand-me-down).

RE: Battery life, not much to worry about here, GM did a good job with engineering the Bolt. The commonly sited "best practices" seem to be:

1. Use Hilltop Reserve (Target Charge Level in 2019+). Charging all the way to 100% is normally not necessary for daily use and is often cited as a factor in accelerating deterioration. Sitting at high SOC in extreme temps is the biggest cause behind this argument. If planning a trip, allow 100%, but schedule it for departure time if possible.
2. Use DC charging sparingly, of course on trips it is essential. But for daily use, stick to L1 or L2 if feasible. Heat + fast charge rates is the nemesis of Leaf owners, but Bolt's thermal battery management system (TBMS) is excellent at mitigating this risk.
3. If your routine is a bunch of short trips, avoid charging after each one. Allow SOC to drop to 30-40% before charging if possible.
4. Avoid fast charge\discharge. Charge is discussed above, but fast discharge (lots of jackrabbit starts) is probably also challenging.
5. Leave it plugged in when temps dip below 30F, or climb above 90F. TBMS runs more frequently when grid-connected, so it will condition battery temps to avoid getting into extreme hot or cold condition.

Mostly, just enjoy your Bolt, based on several high mile owners (100K +), degradation under 10% is realistic, the battery system should last for 200-300K miles and still retain 80%, so don't get too antsy over it.
 

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Welcome, and congratulations!

You already have the car set to Hilltop Reserve. I don't think you need to worry about much else. Maybe try to keep it plugged in if it gets really hot (>90F) or really cold (<32F). Batteries like temperatures similar to humans. If you want heat or A/C, so does your battery. The car will handle that for you, so don't worry. But do try to keep it plugged in so that it can pull power from the grid instead of the battery.

There really isn't much to owning this car. Drive it, enjoy it!
 

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Like you, I am a new owner of both a Toyota Rav 4 hybrid and used Chevy Bolt. The Rav 4 is a great vehicle and the performance and economy the system gets out of a 4 cylinder engine is truly amazing. But when I press on the gas, there's a kind of negotiation process among the engine, battery, electric motor, and CVT. It feels like there's a committee meeting going on under the hood. But the Bolt just takes off, the same strong surge over the whole range. It was a spontaneous purchase after a test drive. No regrets so far but I have to drive the Bolt through a MN winter.
 

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Like you, I am a new owner of both a Toyota Rav 4 hybrid and used Chevy Bolt. The Rav 4 is a great vehicle and the performance and economy the system gets out of a 4 cylinder engine is truly amazing. But when I press on the gas, there's a kind of negotiation process among the engine, battery, electric motor, and CVT. It feels like there's a committee meeting going on under the hood. But the Bolt just takes off, the same strong surge over the whole range. It was a spontaneous purchase after a test drive. No regrets so far but I have to drive the Bolt through a MN winter.
This cracked me up - thanks for that!

I have a Ford CMax Energi PHEV, and don't have this issue. The electric motor responds immediately, and the gas engine eventually kicks in its own contribution (more than doubling the power).

Before the Ford, I had a 2010 Honda Insight. It definitely had the "acceleration response by committee" feel.
 
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