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It's not Chevy saying this, is some people making speculations. Move along.

I'll speculate that a major revision to the Bolt will happen in 2021, where the car will add “Deluxe Super-Rapid Charging”, with the ability to have the car bake a loaf of fresh bread in only 30 minutes while it charges, leapfrogging Tesla's proposal to have their cars' cooling systems double as espresso machines.

Meanwhile, there will be a scandal that Volkswagen's “Electrify America” DC fast charging stations were actually programmed to lie about how much electricity they supply and each charging session is secretly powered by a dirty diesel TDI engine.
 

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In general, automotive production tooling does not last 9 years because stamping dies and welding jigs wear out and become out of tolerance. Cars are restyled during the chassis life cycle because it makes economical sense to restyle the body when the production tooling needs to be updated. The Bolt chassis may stay in production for some time, maybe even out to 2025, but I think the body will have a restyle at some point. GM did release information recently that more EV's are going into production well a head of 2025. It is a safe assumption that the base chassis for those vehicles will be based on and/or a modification of the Bolt's architecture.
 

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2021 Sienna LE AWD "Mr. Sparkollz"
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In general, automotive production tooling does not last 9 years because stamping dies and welding jigs wear out and become out of tolerance. Cars are restyled during the chassis life cycle because it makes economical sense to restyle the body when the production tooling needs to be updated. The Bolt chassis may stay in production for some time, maybe even out to 2025, but I think the body will have a restyle at some point. GM did release information recently that more EV's are going into production well a head of 2025. It is a safe assumption that the base chassis for those vehicles will be based on and/or a modification of the Bolt's architecture.
I'd imagine the wear of the tooling depends not only on its age, but the intensity of its use as well. GM is barely making any Bolts comparing to true mass-market cars.
 

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I'm just fine with the Bolt staying just as it is forever. They can update batteries, and other electronic components, as advances come along. I hope the Bolt becomes the VW Beetle of EVs.
 

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Eight years is a long cycle for any car model, but an eternity for an EV, since EV technology is advancing very quickly compared to a typical ICE car.

While it’s difficult to forecast model designs that far into the future, I would be very surprised if the Bolt design is used for more than a few years. GM can’t stand still while newer and more advanced EVs are introduced by other manufacturers.

One thing to consider is battery energy density. Right now the 60 kWh Bolt battery weighs about 1,000 pounds, has the energy equivalent of about two gallons of gas, and takes up the entire underside of the chassis. As battery energy density improves battery size and weight will shrink, making the basic Bolt design unnecessary. There may not be dramatic battery advances in a year or two, but eight years out it’s likely battery design will be very different than what’s in the current Bolt.
 

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I'm just fine with the Bolt staying just as it is forever. They can update batteries, and other electronic components, as advances come along. I hope the Bolt becomes the VW Beetle of EVs.
It’s far more likely the Bolt will become the Sonic of EVs, a low volume car that quietly gets retired in a few years. I just don’t see any mass market appeal for the Bolt, it’s simply not what the general public is buying.
 

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It’s far more likely the Bolt will become the Sonic of EVs, a low volume car that quietly gets retired in a few years. I just don’t see any mass market appeal for the Bolt, it’s simply not what the general public is buying.
You may very well be right. People seem quite determined to deny climate change. I suspect most will be driving huge vehicles right up until the first time the grain crop fails in the US.
 

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Given what it costs to develop a vehicle, it's no shock that GM would want to amortize the cost over a more or less normal cycle of 8 years on a platform. As far as battery tech goes, Li batteries have been around for decades and intensively researched, improvements are likely to be incremental and more focused on cost reduction than cramming more KW into the same size and weight. IOW, "affordable" EV's are likely to stay in the 60 KW battery size.
But of course I'm biased as owner of a '17. I'd prefer it not be obsolescent before I pay it off.
 

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You may very well be right. People seem quite determined to deny climate change. I suspect most will be driving huge vehicles right up until the first time the grain crop fails in the US.
What gets people out of their behemoths is gas/fuel prices. If we hit $4 or $5 a gallon, large/inefficient vehicles get a lot less attractive to many (but not all) consumers.
But, as EV's take market share and ICE vehicles become more efficient, the supply/demand pressure on oil declines. Predictions of peak oil demand are as soon as 2030 - just a dozen years away. OPEC and other oil producing nations may stop limiting output and we could start a cycle of very abundant and cheap oil. The success of EV's will actually help to keep gas prices low, and therefore more gas guzzlers on the road.
 

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It seems most likely that Chevy will continue to make the Bolt in it's current form for about four more years, with the only significant change being improvements in the battery pack. The next generation has already been unofficially announced for introduction in the next model year: it will have a 75 kWh battery pack using 1-1-1 technology. This will reduce the cost of the battery pack as well as extending the range. I do not foresee them making upgrades to the drivetrain: that's a huge change, and the car is plenty peppy enough already. With 200 hp and 266 ft-lbs. of torque, wheelspin is a problem with the tires delivered on the car.

The volumes just aren't there for major changes and upgrades to the Bolt. Even the battery upgrade(s) are likely to be less of a design improvement than the reality of Chevy's battery supply: LG will no longer want to make the more expensive 6-1-1 batteries, and may offer the better 1-1-1 batteries at a lower price.

It's much more likely that Chevy (and other GM brands) will introduce other models that are more mainstream in design and will compete directly with Tesla: a four door sedan and a four wheel drive SUV are prime candidates. They have already said that a bunch of new electric vehicles will be released by 2023. It's likely that one of those new EVs will make the Bolt redundant.
 

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Lot of speculation in here. While they may keep the chassis/platform largely intact for 5-8 years I'm sure there will be significant changes to the vehicles styling and mechanical/electrical components.

In any case, the longer GM keeps the Bolt "as is" the more it will benefit us as current Bolt owners. Not only will it help us minimize depreciation but it will mean increasing probability of aftermarket support such as for example the possibility of a 3rd party company deciding to make and market remanufacturerd (or even upgraded) battery packs to give old worn out Bolts new life. Of course we already saw two versions of the battery pack (with seemingly minor changes) just in the 2017 model year so that might be a bit much to hope for.


You may very well be right. People seem quite determined to deny climate change. I suspect most will be driving huge vehicles right up until the first time the grain crop fails in the US.
People can deny climate change but when gas prices spike people start clamoring for more efficient vehicles. I remember it wasn't that long ago we had a big spike and old beat up Geo Mertos that had been selling for under $1500 6 months previously were going for $3000-$4000 and car dealers couldn't give away used SUVs.

What gets people out of their behemoths is gas/fuel prices.
Exactly, right now oil prices are near historic lows (when adjusted for inflation) and oil producing companies are pumping all the oil out of the ground they can. This is reducing actually reducing investment in oil exploration technologies. When (not if) we see an interrupt in the supply, whether caused by supply exhaustion or political divisions the supply is going to dry up in a hurry and there will be a long lead time to get the new sources of supply online (and in any case those new sources will be more expensive to exploit).
 

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Given what it costs to develop a vehicle, it's no shock that GM would want to amortize the cost over a more or less normal cycle of 8 years on a platform. As far as battery tech goes, Li batteries have been around for decades and intensively researched, improvements are likely to be incremental and more focused on cost reduction than cramming more KW into the same size and weight. IOW, "affordable" EV's are likely to stay in the 60 KW battery size.
But of course I'm biased as owner of a '17. I'd prefer it not be obsolescent before I pay it off.
The energy density of lithium batteries has roughly been doubling about every eight or nine years. Although some improvement is incremental, progress “jumps” when a better chemistry or new manufacturing technique is introduced. While there’s no guarantee this trend will continue, there’s billions being spent on battery R&D, and it’s likely that EV drivetrain weight will be less than that in an equivalent ICE vehicle in just a few years.

Smaller and lighter batteries will mean better range for an equivalent kWh rating. If the Bolt battery weighed 500 pounds less range might top 300 miles while still using a 60 kWh battery. Lots of Bolt components could also be lightened, compounding the positive affect of a lighter battery. A 2,500 pound Bolt would perform much better than a 3,500 pound Bolt.
 

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The success of EV's will actually help to keep gas prices low, and therefore more gas guzzlers on the road.
Yup. What is needed, but I can't see how we get there, is a government effort like WWII. Tell OEMs to stop making tanks (pun intended), and start building small efficient EVs, ration gas for agriculture and other vital industries.
 

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Yup. What is needed, but I can't see how we get there, is a government effort like WWII. Tell OEMs to stop making tanks (pun intended), and start building small efficient EVs, ration gas for agriculture and other vital industries.
There’s no reason why large SUVs and pickup trucks can’t also be electric. As batteries get lighter, cheaper, and more powerful it’s likely they’ll find their way into every type of vehicle.
 

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There’s no reason why large SUVs and pickup trucks can’t also be electric. As batteries get lighter, cheaper, and more powerful it’s likely they’ll find their way into every type of vehicle.
The reason they can't be...electric...gas...or run on fairy farts...is because we have to reduce our CO2 emissions by an order of magnitude, before your babies reach middle age. Why is that is so hard for people to grasp, other than the fact that our federal government, and half the "media" are in complete denial about climate change?
 

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The reason they can't be...electric...gas...or run on fairy farts...is because we have to reduce our CO2 emissions by an order of magnitude, before your babies reach middle age. Why is that is so hard for people to grasp, other than the fact that our federal government, and half the "media" are in complete denial about climate change?
Any vehicle class that’s redesigned to run on electricity dramatically reduces energy use, and our electrical energy grid is much cleaner than it was even a few years ago. Renewable energy is booming, and older dirtier power plants are being retired.

We’re rapidly reaching a tipping point, as many renewable energy sources are already cost competitive without any subsidies, and renewables make up the majority of new power capacity being installed in the USA.

Political headwinds aside, it’s clear that the trend is for much cleaner energy and transportation sectors, the two largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions.
 

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installed in the USA.

Political headwinds aside, it’s clear that the trend is for much cleaner energy and transportation sectors, the two largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions.
Graphs like these give a good idea of the size of the challenge, and why scientists say we need to move to renewables as quickly as possible (not as quickly as is convenient), and that we will still need to significantly reduce our energy use to have any chance of limiting CO2 to acceptable levels.

http://thesolutionsproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/jacobson-us-renewables-2015.png

https://gailtheactuary.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/united-states-energy-consumption-bp.png
 

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The Honda Fit has been around for 19 years and still going strong.
3 revisions: Gen1 2001 - 2008 (MPG 38/45) / Gen2 2009 - 2014 (MPG 28/35)/ Gen3 2014 - Present (MPG 33/40).
Not really a whole lot that can be changed in The subcompact rolling 'Sun Flower Seed' vehicle class (like the Bolt). If the vehicle is popular, there is no reason to make any drastic changes.

The Fit is considered a very noteworthy car. Interestingly, when introduced to the U.S. in 2006, the Fit sold a total of 27,934 units. The Bolt EV's debut year sales was (about) 23,800. From 2007 on, the Fit sells an average of (about) 55,000 units/year like clockwork. The Fit is considered 'mainstream' and successful. If the Bolt sells over 40,000 units/year in US, it should have a similar longevity & update trajectory with very minor modifications.

2002 Gen1 Honda Fit



2010 Gen2 Honda Fit



2016 Gen3 Honda Fit

 

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You may very well be right. People seem quite determined to deny climate change. I suspect most will be driving huge vehicles right up until the first time the grain crop fails in the US.
So what you really mean is anthropogenic climate change. The climate changes, no one that understands science and has reviewed the fossil record denies the climate changes. In fact, if the climate didn't change, you'd not be here. Regarding anthropogenic climate change, I'm not determined; I deny it just out of plain rational science.
 
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