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I guess I'm a bit late to the party, but I finally got around to fashioning a 240V adapter for my OEM EVSE and empirically it doesn't seem that the EVSE gets any warmer than when I had run it off of 120V. The adapter (or rather the NEMA 5-15 side) however does get fairly warm.
 

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New bolt owner here. Looking for the best plug in charging option aside from the tesla gen 2 mobile with jdapter/tesla tap. I just want to be sure that it is OK to use the OEM 120v EVSE that came with the 17' bolt on a 220V circuit? If so how much of an increase are you seeing with this set up compared with the 4mi/hr on 110 trickle charge? Thanks, Jeff
 

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It depends on your outlet voltage, but its around twice as fast. I have one location with a short wire run that is more than twice as fast and one location that is less than twice as fast.

The adapter (or rather the NEMA 5-15 side) however does get fairly warm.
Set your 120v for 12 amps and see how warm it gets. Mine gets really warm even on 120v. Even the wire gets a little warm.
 

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New bolt owner here. Looking for the best plug in charging option aside from the tesla gen 2 mobile with jdapter/tesla tap. I just want to be sure that it is OK to use the OEM 120v EVSE that came with the 17' bolt on a 220V circuit? If so how much of an increase are you seeing with this set up compared with the 4mi/hr on 110 trickle charge? Thanks, Jeff
I've been running mine over 2 years on 240V. It almost charges a bar an hour. So 10 miles/hr would be very reasonable.
 

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I'm another Bolt owner who charges at home exclusively with the OEM charger running at 240V. I've done it since I bought the car in September 2017 and never had any issues whatsoever. 240V at 12V gives you 2.88kW of power, so I usually guesstimate adding around 2.5kWh of energy to the battery each hour. As XJ12 said, that's almost a bar an hour. At EPA efficiencies that's around 16km or 10 miles of range per hour of charging. A 12-hour overnight charge gets me almost 200km of driving.
 

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Do you know if it is straight 220? or do I need a neutral for this to work? Do I need adapter for plug? Thanks
 

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Do you know if it is straight 220? or do I need a neutral for this to work? Do I need adapter for plug? Thanks
Neutral is never used when 240v is being supplied. Certain outlets like the NEMA 14-50 might have a neutral connection in addition to the 2 hot connections (and ground), but that's only so that both 120v and 240v are available. In other words, neutral is only used for 120v.
 

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Neutral is never used when 240v is being supplied. Certain outlets like the NEMA 14-50 might have a neutral connection in addition to the 2 hot connections (and ground), but that's only so that both 120v and 240v are available. In other words, neutral is only used for 120v.
I always include Neutral when wiring a 240V AC circuit. That allows for future circuit usage flexibility for a small incremental cost. Doing this has served me well on multiple occasions.
 

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I always include Neutral when wiring a 240V AC circuit. That allows for future circuit usage flexibility for a small incremental cost. Doing this has served me well on multiple occasions.
Same here... the standard is to run all 4 wires for a NEMA 14-50, so just do that. No point saving a few bucks for potential headache in the future. Labor costs more, whether the value of your time or the cost of an electrician. Do it once and do it right.
 

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I always include Neutral when wiring a 240V AC circuit. That allows for future circuit usage flexibility for a small incremental cost. Doing this has served me well on multiple occasions.
If you consider the context in which I was replying, the guy asked if an adapter for the OEM EVSE needs neutral to utilize 240v. It doesn't, which is what everyone has replied, and is perfectly reasonable to make an adapter that can accommodate a 3-prong dryer outlet.

I appreciate that you're adding information by bringing up the yet unmentioned topic of adding a circuit. I too choose to wire in a 4 wire 14-50R when I added an outlet to charge my wimpy 2.88 kW Prius.

To the more broad topic of paying slightly more to do something right; it's a frequent critique of mine that corners are cut in the name of saving <5% of the cost of something. When I see a $1000 device break because a manufacturer chose a $0.01 part instead of a $0.02 part, it drives me crazy. For that matter, it drives me insane that nearly all garage outlets are wired for 15A instead of 20. Pay the extra $20 on your $250,000 house!
 

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I’m trying to explain this to my retired electrician father who will be doing the wiring.
He wants to know if this needs a neutral to complete the circuit? Is the OEM 110 able to take a straight 220? So the the neutral on the 110 will become the second hot leg? Thanks for all your help so far
 

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I’m trying to explain this to my retired electrician father who will be doing the wiring.
He wants to know if this needs a neutral to complete the circuit? Is the OEM 110 able to take a straight 220? So the the neutral on the 110 will become the second hot leg? Thanks for all your help so far
That is correct. The OEM Chevrolet Bolt EVSE that comes with the car can operate as you suggest. The neutral indeed becomes the second hot leg. It's not well documented because it involves bending the rules with how plugs are rated, etc but I for one have done it for almost a full month while installing my dedicated EVSE. I for one, could have just stayed with the OEM EVSE as it provided enough power, at the appropriate rate for 'my' use.
 

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If you consider the context in which I was replying, the guy asked if an adapter for the OEM EVSE needs neutral to utilize 240v. It doesn't, which is what everyone has replied, and is perfectly reasonable to make an adapter that can accommodate a 3-prong dryer outlet.

I appreciate that you're adding information by bringing up the yet unmentioned topic of adding a circuit. I too choose to wire in a 4 wire 14-50R when I added an outlet to charge my wimpy 2.88 kW Prius.

To the more broad topic of paying slightly more to do something right; it's a frequent critique of mine that corners are cut in the name of saving <5% of the cost of something. When I see a $1000 device break because a manufacturer chose a $0.01 part instead of a $0.02 part, it drives me crazy. For that matter, it drives me insane that nearly all garage outlets are wired for 15A instead of 20. Pay the extra $20 on your $250,000 house!
Yup. When I completely rewired my house during a remodel, I used nothing but #12AWG for "regular" circuits. Even on the pigtails. This made for sore hands at the end of wiring days, but now I know my circuits won't be under-powered, and dimming lights when appliances turn on are a thing of the past. The interior receptacles are all 5-15s, because 5-20Rs just look strange. Everything outside and in the garage are 5-20Rs, except for the two 14-50Rs that feed my EVSEs.

It did cost incrementally more, but I think it was well worth it for the long run.
 
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