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Hi everybody, first post here!

I'm trying to verify that I have an OEM EVSE that can in fact safely operate on a 240v outlet. I've attached a couple of pics. Sorry they're so huge.

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tldr:
Our dealer did not educate us much about how best to charge this car, and they also let my wife (primary driver) drive off without a charger. Luckily we're not too far away, and they let us pick one up from the parts department. It's only through the generous resources of this forum that I've learned about 240v charging with the OEM EVSE. My wife has a 40 mile daily commute and severe range anxiety, and does not want to charge every night. We leased a couple of Nissan Leafs before the Bolt and got used to the idea of fully charging overnight. We had quite a surprise the first time we charged the Bolt off the 110v! So now we're looking into higher-powered charging options. We have a great electrician and a recent electrical panel with plenty of space, so I was going to start by having a 240v/50A outlet installed in the garage, and charge with the OEM EVSE. (via a homemade adapter, well marked with warnings) If the little lady decides it's still not fast enough, we can buy a 32 amp charger.

Thanks in advance for your input, and I'm happy to be part of this community!
Greg
 

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I'm trying to verify that I have an OEM EVSE that can in fact safely operate on a 240v outlet. I've attached a couple of pics.
Except for the serial number and a green light (mines plugged into 240v), everything else is identical to what I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Great, thanks! So the green light works the same when plugged into 240v?
 

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Great, thanks! So the green light works the same when plugged into 240v?
Yep. Get a green light. All's good. The thing doesn't seem to care if it's on 120v or 240v. I actually opened one up and the electric board is clearly labeled L1 and L2. I thought I would rewire it, but everything is soldered in so I just made the adapter instead.
 

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Hard to imagine having range anxiety with a Bolt and a 40 mile commute... owning a Leaf will do that to you I guess :)

Also, if they dealer let you drive off without an EVSE, then I doubt they explained to you that the car defaults to 8 amps when charging on 120V giving you a whopping 880 to 960 watts depending on the voltage at your plug vs setting the car to 12 amps which would give you 1.3 to 1.4 KW... you can recover a full 40 miles of winter range (14 KW) in around 10 hours at 12 amps... the same range would take over 14 hours to recover at 8 amps.

In other words, you may not actually need the 240V adapter. If you do use an adaper I recomend using one of these rather than relying on warning stickers. Plug Lockout, Plastic, 110 Voltage, 1/2" Max. Cord Dia.

Keith
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Also, if they dealer let you drive off without an EVSE, then I doubt they explained to you that the car defaults to 8 amps when charging on 120V giving you a whopping 880 to 960 watts depending on the voltage at your plug vs setting the car to 12 amps which would give you 1.3 to 1.4 KW... you can recover a full 40 miles of winter range (14 KW) in around 10 hours at 12 amps... the same range would take over 14 hours to recover at 8 amps.
Correct. This is another nugget I was able to glean from this forum! Thank you all!

And thanks Keith for the recommendation of the outlet chastity belt.
 

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Hi everybody, first post here!
Welcome aboard!
My wife has a 40 mile daily commute and severe range anxiety, and does not want to charge every night.
Interesting combo here. Typically range worriers want to plug in everywhere and all the time. They typically are ABCers (Always Be Charging).

The Bolt is built for this. But one must be aware that at 40-50% State of Charge (SOC) that it'll take more than an overnight charge to refill because the Bolt needs 30-35 kWh of energy to recharge back to full and at 120V 10 hours of charging only gets you a shade less than 15 kWh.

So a 240V line with an adapter will get closer to the mark, doubling the available energy.

Can't walk away without stating the obvious. With a 40 mile commute, which is easily covered by 120V overnight, the simplest solution is to recharge every night, or even every other night. But as we all know folks have their reasons for doing what they do. I remember a poster that I believe was here that refused to recharge overnight and would only charge the vehicle once a week, as that's how they treated their ICE vehicles. Sometimes all one can do is shake one's head.

BTW great plan on the 50A 240V circuit. Makes no sense to pull heavier wire later even though you're not using the capacity right now. I would also suggest watching Craigslist for EVSEs. They get put up from time to time. I scored a 32A Bosch in nearly new condition for $200. Still haven't mounted it and charging on 120V 95% of the time. But once I get the 240V line wired in, I'll be ready to go.

ga2500ev
 

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and would only charge the vehicle once a week
Hey, that's what I still do (except I get some free electrons once a week while enjoying lunch) but it must be someone else as I charge at night. I figured the battery has so many cycles and most can't agree what is considered a cycle. Why not charge once per week if that works? I live in a hot climate, so I figured keeping the battery at a lower state of charge is better in my case. Charging once per week means that the battery is only at a higher state of charge for a short period of time.

Why not treat your EV like an ICE? Isn't that the whole point with today's tech in the EV. My phone is a PITA trying to remember to plug it in all the time. My car is a car with a big battery that can go days without charging. Love it. And the Bolt doesn't scream that I'm an EV. I like that too.
 

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With a 40 mile commute, which is easily covered by 120V overnight, the simplest solution is to recharge every night, or even every other night. But as we all know folks have their reasons for doing what they do.
If you have a regular short commute and your day-to-day routine is pretty well set then charging once a week might work really well. But if you're retired and tend to do things on the spur of the moment then it makes a lot more sense to plug in every night. Everyone's different, that's why asking for advice is fraught with danger.
 

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If you have a regular short commute and your day-to-day routine is pretty well set then charging once a week might work really well. But if you're retired and tend to do things on the spur of the moment then it makes a lot more sense to plug in every night. Everyone's different, that's why asking for advice is fraught with danger.
The only problem with that approach is that the long delay between charges is likely to create a large kWh deficit, which is going to need a much faster charger to replenish. It just seems to me that for someone with range anxiety that keeping a relative high SOC would be a high priority. Charging regularly is the easiest way to maintain that. Mixing in irregular charging complicates the situation quite a bit IMHO.

I guess I'm just dreaming for the day where I have the option of not charging everyday. 200+ mile EVs are still in my future, not the present.

ga2500ev
 

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Hey, that's what I still do (except I get some free electrons once a week while enjoying lunch) but it must be someone else as I charge at night. I figured the battery has so many cycles and most can't agree what is considered a cycle. Why not charge once per week if that works? I live in a hot climate, so I figured keeping the battery at a lower state of charge is better in my case. Charging once per week means that the battery is only at a higher state of charge for a short period of time.

Why not treat your EV like an ICE? Isn't that the whole point with today's tech in the EV. My phone is a PITA trying to remember to plug it in all the time. My car is a car with a big battery that can go days without charging. Love it. And the Bolt doesn't scream that I'm an EV. I like that too.
This tells you all you need to know. The video explains conditions where the cells get damaged, so avoid those conditions and you are prolonging the battery life.




And my conclusion based on the third link for cell to reach 90% capacity (battery warranty tend to be @60 or 70% capacity).
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But as many have said here, for a typical ownership period (one decade, 100-200k miles), it does not matter much.
 
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