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Here's a link to the official Ampera-E range simulator from the Opel Germany website:

http://www.opel.de/fahrzeuge/ampera-e/uebersicht/partials/reichweite/reichweitensimulator.html

I posted this link as a reply in another thread, but given how useful it is, I thought I might give it its own.

It differs itself from the other range/savings calculators I have seen from Chevy by showing changes in range corresponding to different speed profiles, ambient temperatures, and whether or not climate controls are being used. It's the only one I have seen that accurately reflects the drastic drop in range in cold temperatures and high speeds.

The page is in German, but the three variables you can to play with are:

Speed Profile: low (niedrig) to very high (sehr hoch)
Ambient temperature: -20C to 40C
Heating/Cooling: on (an) and off (aus)

As mentioned, it accurately predicts the range/efficiency for the full range of driving conditions I have experienced.

As a bit of a test this weekend, I decided to self impose a speed limit of 95 km/h (60 mph) on the 401 (interstate), and sure enough, I was able to get my efficiency to around 18 kWh/100km (3.4 mi/kWh) from the 25-30 kWh/100km (2-2.5 mi/kWh) I had been seeing when driving up at around 115 km/h (70 mph), in slightly colder temps.
 

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Here's a link to the official Ampera-E range simulator from the Opel Germany website:

http://www.opel.de/fahrzeuge/ampera-e/uebersicht/partials/reichweite/reichweitensimulator.html

I posted this link as a reply in another thread, but given how useful it is, I thought I might give it its own.

It differs itself from the other range/savings calculators I have seen from Chevy by showing changes in range corresponding to different speed profiles, ambient temperatures, and whether or not climate controls are being used. It's the only one I have seen that accurately reflects the drastic drop in range in cold temperatures and high speeds.

The page is in German, but the three variables you can to play with are:

Speed Profile: low (niedrig) to very high (sehr hoch)
Ambient temperature: -20C to 40C
Heating/Cooling: on (an) and off (aus)

As mentioned, it accurately predicts the range/efficiency for the full range of driving conditions I have experienced.

As a bit of a test this weekend, I decided to self impose a speed limit of 95 km/h (60 mph) on the 401 (interstate), and sure enough, I was able to get my efficiency to around 18 kWh/100km (3.4 mi/kWh) from the 25-30 kWh/100km (2-2.5 mi/kWh) I had been seeing when driving up at around 115 km/h (70 mph), in slightly colder temps.

Danke für diese Information! Es hat wirklich gut funktioniert. ;)
 
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I suppose Opel didn't want to get themselves into trouble by including more significant variables. Apart from the dyno-type test data they're required to do.

Two more very significant variables, IMO: 1.) frequency and severity of elevation changes, 2.) wind direction and wind speed.
 
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