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are there serious advantages to a permanently installed EVSE vs. portable? it seems like the portable ones are much cheaper, although they don't have things like wifi or whatever.

since i'm renting it makes little sense to install a permanent fixture, and it would be nice to have the portable to take with me for emergency charges in someone's dryer outlet. along those lines, are there adapters to go from NEMA 6-20 to NEMA 10-30, etc?
 

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If you have to park outside and charge, a permanently hard-wired installed unit makes it a lot harder to steal than one that you can just unplug and run off with.

For someone renting, a portable unit that can be used with an idle 240 outlet (dryer plug, welding plug) may make more sense.
 

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If you have to park outside and charge, a permanently hard-wired installed unit makes it a lot harder to steal than one that you can just unplug and run off with.

For someone renting, a portable unit that can be used with an idle 240 outlet (dryer plug, welding plug) may make more sense.
Code also usually requires units mounted outside to be hardwired.

Even with a "weatherproof" cover, the chances of corrosion ---> higher resistance ---> heat ---> fire dramatically increase. There have been several garage fires reported from plugs with poor connection overheating. An outdoor plug is even more susceptible.

A properly installed hardwired unit does not have the "weak link" of a plug/receptacle, and some prefer it. It isn't very hard to remove a hardwired unit and either cap the wires or install a receptacle when moving.
 

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hard wired units also can deliver more AMP's for cars other than the Bolt that can charge at higher rates - future proofing your charging infrastructure - install a 40/50/60/80 AMP unit for future EV's that can charge at greater rates - buy it once, and then you're done for your next EV.

NOTE: I know the bolt can only charge at 32 amps (40 amp circuit) - but hopefully chevy and others will continue to push for greater charging rates…32 amps can not fully charge (5% to full) in an 8 hour off-peak charging window.
 

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Charging at 30 amps is about 25 miles per hour. After I plug in at home, I usually spend at least an hour preparing and eating dinner, 8 hours sleeping, and at least an hour preparing to sleep and getting ready to go again. That's 10 hours or 250 miles gained. The Bolt doesn't even hold that much.

But cars in the future will be able to charge much faster than the Bolt. How many times will you be driving 250 miles, stopping at home to plug in, then driving another 250 miles? That scenario is what the commercial fast charging network is for.

I doubt you will ever even *need* to charge an electric car at home at a rate greater than 30 amps. You may *want* to brag about how powerful your EVSE is.
 

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Charging at 30 amps is about 25 miles per hour. After I plug in at home, I usually spend at least an hour preparing and eating dinner, 8 hours sleeping, and at least an hour preparing to sleep and getting ready to go again. That's 10 hours or 250 miles gained. The Bolt doesn't even hold that much.

But cars in the future will be able to charge much faster than the Bolt. How many times will you be driving 250 miles, stopping at home to plug in, then driving another 250 miles? That scenario is what the commercial fast charging network is for.

I doubt you will ever even *need* to charge an electric car at home at a rate greater than 30 amps. You may *want* to brag about how powerful your EVSE is.
Agreed, the size of the battery is inversely proportional to the need for faster charging (beyond a certain point). It would be great to have a 60Amp charger for my 2011 Volt which I run down and stop at home quick to top up (if I could), but right now it takes way too long.
 

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Charging at 30 amps is about 25 miles per hour. After I plug in at home, I usually spend at least an hour preparing and eating dinner, 8 hours sleeping, and at least an hour preparing to sleep and getting ready to go again. That's 10 hours or 250 miles gained. The Bolt doesn't even hold that much.

But cars in the future will be able to charge much faster than the Bolt. How many times will you be driving 250 miles, stopping at home to plug in, then driving another 250 miles? That scenario is what the commercial fast charging network is for.

I doubt you will ever even *need* to charge an electric car at home at a rate greater than 30 amps. You may *want* to brag about how powerful your EVSE is.
this actual scenario hits me about once a month…normally when doing pleasure driving

active day in the Bay Area - errands, dropping kids off, over the hill and back from Santa Cruz, pick up someone from an airport - come home after a busy busy day and find you have 10-20% battery - but the day does not end - there is dinner/show in the City - another 140 miles round trip…and you only have 2-3 hours to shower and get ready for dinner - that's when you appreciate an EV that can charge at > 30 mph/range while you take 1-3 hours down time to get ready for the evening…

the argument that I don't need it is pure and simple rationalization that attempts to minimize an actual need - EV's need to held to the same standard as gas cars - and this type of scenario is something an ICE handles with ease - faster charger EVSE in one's home moves the EV closer to parity with an ICE - which allows a no-compromise transition to an EV transportation infrastructure - no one will turn down faster, and this is the EV's weak point - there is no 10 minute fill up…having a in home "faster" charger has proven time and time again to be a smart decision and made the EV practical for situations in which it wouldn't be due to slow charging…

also in the future "multi-EV" house hold - multiple chargers than can share a high amperage circuit and split the load while charging given each car in the busy American dream family life of much car driving an equal shot of being charged over night…it's not that hard to exhaust an 8 hour "off peak" charging window when you have two busy adults and kids with our daily activities and you're depleting two batteries at once.
 

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People's dryer outlets (NEMA 16-50) are usually far away from where you park your car, so a 16-50 to ?? "extension cord" (which may void your charger's warranty) would be needed. However, many RV campgrounds have this very outlet near to where you can park. A short (<1 foot of 8-2 w/ground) "adapter cable" (dry weather only) for your charger's specific plug may be a lifesaver. The plug, wire, and receptacle are all rated for 50 amps and most chargers will limit the current to 30 amps, making this very safe. I have called one of these campsites which lists on PlugShare and they will accept a small "donation" for charging in lieu of a full site rental.) If you think you would encounter this scenario frequently, a "portable" EVSE (with the adapter cable) may be a better fit. I own a 30 amp VersiCharge, garage mounted with a 6-50 plug (not hard-wired). It is not truly "portable" but it is very light and can be carried on that rare trip when I have few other options.
 
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