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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Atlanta and have a 40 mile round trip surface street/stop go commute each day.

I bought a 2017 Premier 1 year ago today that had 39,000 miles on it. I just passed 56,000 miles (17,000 miles driven) . My average is 4.1 mi/kWh over the last 12 months. Electricity here in GA costs 0.10$/kWh overnight.
17,000 miles / 4.1 miles/kWh x 0.10$ = 414$ in fuel costs

My previous vehicle was a 2008 Camry that got 24 mpg
17,000 miles / 24 miles/gallon x 3.20$ = 2,267$

The 50A/240V installation in my garage and Level 2 EVSE cost me 1500$.

No oil changes ( 150$ savings )
Insurance ( 150$ cheaper per year than the Camry with my insurance )
License fee ( 195$ more expensive , Georgia charges electric vehicle owners 220$ to register instead of 25$ )
No Emissions test ( 25$ savings )

Total Bolt impact for me : +500$ in my pocket this year plus less emissions. Next year without the 1500$ install/EVSE on the books I will save nearly 2000$ a year in operating costs versus an average commuter car

**** Yeah !
 

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I live in Atlanta and have a 40 mile round trip surface street/stop go commute each day.

I bought a 2017 Premier 1 year ago today that had 39,000 miles on it. I just passed 56,000 miles (17,000 miles driven) . My average is 4.1 mi/kWh over the last 12 months. Electricity here in GA costs 0.10$/kWh overnight.
17,000 miles / 4.1 miles/kWh x 0.10$ = 414$ in fuel costs

My previous vehicle was a 2008 Camry that got 24 mpg
17,000 miles / 24 miles/gallon x 3.20$ = 2,267$

The 50A/240V installation in my garage and Level 2 EVSE cost me 1500$.

No oil changes ( 150$ savings )
Insurance ( 150$ cheaper per year than the Camry with my insurance )
License fee ( 195$ more expensive , Georgia charges electric vehicle owners 220$ to register instead of 25$ )
No Emissions test ( 25$ savings )

Total Bolt impact for me : +500$ in my pocket this year plus less emissions. Next year without the 1500$ install/EVSE on the books I will save nearly 2000$ a year in operating costs versus an average commuter car

**** Yeah !
Given many car buyers on the EV sidelines are likely less motivated by emissions arguments for switching, this is the kind of story that can appeal to a wide audience.

I have a similar story that I share with ICE drivers. For me, it was all about operational cost savings, and with a 130 mile commute, savings were clearly evident.
 

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Even better if you have solar on the roof! :):)
My 2022 came with the electric install in the garage from Chevy. Plus I got a nice clipper creek HCS 40 to fill the tank for reasonable $600 ish.
 

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Is the 4.1 miles/kWh reported from the car, or based on your electric bill? That is, does it account for Charge losses (our level 2 EVSE is about 90% efficient in winter, closer to 95% in summer, I believe). Not a huge difference, but in the interest of a true apples to apples comparison and all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is the 4.1 miles/kWh reported from the car, or based on your electric bill? That is, does it account for Charge losses (our level 2 EVSE is about 90% efficient in winter, closer to 95% in summer, I believe). Not a huge difference, but in the interest of a true apples to apples comparison and all.
the data came from the car odometer readout. I dont have a dedicated meter for the 50A circuit so I dont know the exact power pulled from my house for care charging. I figured it is as good a proxy as I will have. Even bumping the kWh pulled from the home is actually 10% higher it only increases the annual electric charging costs from 410$ to 450$.
 

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Great post. I think $150 for oil changes is low and that you underestimate the maintenance on a 2008 car.

Do you have anything factored in for alignments for your Bolt? You may need to add a cabin filter, too. But you could argue you would have had those costs on a Camry.

Georgia charges electric vehicle owners 220$ to register instead of 25$ ) .
That's a weird one, but legislatures will think of other ways to offset loss of fuel tax revenue.
 

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Given many car buyers on the EV sidelines are likely less motivated by emissions arguments for switching, this is the kind of story that can appeal to a wide audience.
I traveled for years consulting and took a pay cut to come off the road. Zeroing out my commuting costs was step one, used Leaf, solar on the roof, I drove it for over 4 years selling it for what I paid, total ownership costs was insurance and registration. My co-workers still just laughed off the idea, even on the coldest days when I would laugh at them for standing in the cold to pump gas, ICErs forget that if you charge at home you spend no time looking for power, waiting....
 

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Yes, for those with long daily commutes and high annual miles, there's a payback.

We're retired, with only 5,000 local miles annually. For more than ten years, we knew an EV would be perfect for our use, but with a paid-for ICE in the garage, the savings would never be a positive. Finally, when the Bolt became available, we just said there are intangibles which don't show up on the bottom line, paid near-MSRP and have enjoyed it every day.

jack vines
 

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The 50A/240V installation in my garage and Level 2 EVSE cost me 1500$.
With a 40 mi daily commute you could have saved the $ 1500.- on the level 2 setup since a regular 120V outlet would have brought you back to full charge overnite. My experience with a similar daily commute. If I do more than that in a day, it might take me 2 days to get back to 80% or 100%, but I have never needed Level 2 charging speed with that kind of a commute. Just wanted to mention that to anybody at the start of their ev planning. With a typical commute, 120V works.
If you WANT 240V, that's another story, but you don't NEED it. Just my experience after a year and 13000 miles of use.
 

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With a 40 mi daily commute you could have saved the $ 1500.- on the level 2 setup since a regular 120V outlet would have brought you back to full charge overnite. My experience with a similar daily commute. If I do more than that in a day, it might take me 2 days to get back to 80% or 100%, but I have never needed Level 2 charging speed with that kind of a commute. Just wanted to mention that to anybody at the start of their ev planning. With a typical commute, 120V works.
If you WANT 240V, that's another story, but you don't NEED it. Just my experience after a year and 13000 miles of use.
You need L2 if you are facing real winter temperatures and you like to have a toasty car before you leave home. When I bought my Volt Gen 1, for four months I used only the 110V circuit. It was enough, the 55 - 65 km I was doing during the day were put back during the night. But, once the cold weather came in, I needed the L2 for conveniency and it was great to be able to have a full Volt in 4 hours.
 

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I have enough solar panels to handle the entire house electric demand and our 2019 Bolt usage of 6000 mi/yr. I get a smile on my face every time I take a drive - on "sunshine" power! This vehicle is incredibly cheap to drive and maintain and just plain fun to drive.
 

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Most non EV's don't think about the Bolt or an EV to really be a cost reduction strategy for the owner. To me, that's what it is. I make my comparisons on what I used to drive (GMC Yukon). My EVSE and the associated installation was less than $1000 total. Sure I do have solar on my roof but I charge my Bolt between midnight and 6 am on $0.09 / kWh SDG&E power so I am "drawing power from the grid." With the price of fuel here in CA at $4.53 for the closest regular gas to my house, I calculate what I spend on trips to Orange County and back. Went to Irvine the other day for lunch and shopping with my wife. I am averaging 4.2 mpkWh in the Bolt. So, the 120 mile round trip was $2.57 in power. Equivalent fuel cost would have been $27.18 in the Yukon at 20 mpg on the highway (which is a stretch at best). Or 10,000 miles per year in the Bolt costs me $214 annually vs the Yukon would be $2265 (and that for the highway BEST mpg in the Yukon). I would get a lot less in the city. The OP is right about Oil and Filter Changes, Transmission Fluid, Coolant Flushes, etc. The Bolt for me is all about cost reduction. Do I sometimes have to plan my driving a little more? You bet. But, with the cost savings especially what is going on with the price of gas since 1 year ago, the Bolt has been a very wise financial decision.
 
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