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Wondering if any of you have bought a charging station and decide not to have an electrician to install it with an inspection. Like just asking for a RV plug to be installed in the garage without specifying it's for EV charging. Can you still receive a rebate on the unit itself? Or does it require you to have an inspection to get the rebate, therefore might as well pay for an inspection paper.
 

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There are two separate rebates - the charger and the electrical wiring.

For the charger, you have no need for an inspection - just a receipt from a valid company/EVSE model. Max is $500.00, or the cost of the unit (whichever is less).

For the wiring, you need to have it inspected if you want the rebate. Max is $500, or the cost of installation/inspection (whichever is less).

Good luck on getting either for less that $500.00 in my experience! :) Hope that answered the question.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There are two separate rebates - the charger and the electrical wiring.
That's what I thought too. I'm quoting the following from the rebate guide:

For the incentive application to be considered, the completed application must include all of the following (legible copies of materials are acceptable):
1. A complete copy of the itemized receipt for the purchase of an eligible electric vehicle charging station (receipt/invoice must include Canadian dealer/website/retailer name, address and phone number, purchase date and price, product make and model);
2. The invoice or receipt for the electric vehicle charging station installation if undertaken by a licensed electrical contractor;
3. The invoice or receipt for the electrical inspection cost (this can be obtained either as part of the invoice for the installation if undertaken by a licensed electrical contractor or by ESA (Electrical Safety Authority) if the installation was undertaken by an authorized person, other than a licensed electrical contractor); and,
4. The certificate of inspection issued by ESA.

It says ALL of those documents. Especially #3 and #4 , gave me the impression that I need an inspection to even get rebate for the charing station.
 

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Correct. No exceptions. Example: upon my asking for the ESA certificate of inspection my licensed electrician gave me a copy of the ESA's "Requested Inspection Outcome Summary Report" . So I submitted that document along with my electrician invoice.

7-months later the Ministry sent me an email: that ESA document I submitted was no good. They must have the real "ESA Certificate of Inspection". So I contacted ESA and finally got it, and submitted it.

Thus in my experience the Ministry is administering this program very closely to the guidelines.
 

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Check the wording to; the rebates are only for 50% of your cost of both the unit and the install, up to the $500 max for both separately. Just got my rebate nearly 7 months after submission. The receipt from Chevy for the charger did not state the make and model of the charger, so the MoF emailed me back requesting I submit pictures of the unit and the sticker on the side of the charger showing the make/model. Still that bring me up to $15k total in rebates which is pretty nice....
 

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From my understanding;

There are two rebates on the form that provide 50% rebate on each up to a max of $500 each.

1) EVSE Rebate
2) Electrical costs for installation of said EVSE.

1) Reqires the invoice from a canadian company showing the purchase of a listed EVSE etc. (Requirements are listed)

2) As it is law that all electrical work in the province generally requires a certified electrician, followed by an ESA electrical inspection, both the invoice for the contractor installation and the ESA Bill are required for rebate 2.


You can purchase 1) with a plug option and plug it into your existing dryer outlet with a cord and an ESA inspection would not be required because not electrical work was done.

If in doubt you can call the number listed on the form and ask.
 

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In case anybody is still waiting for their rebate, as of January 22, 2018 the Ministry of Finance is presently processing claims submitted in early September 2017.
 

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Wire it yourself if you have some diy skills cost like 100$ in parts, the 6 gauge wire costing the most depending on the length then the breaker under 30 dollars and receptical 5 bucks. I've called around and once they know your wiring for an electric car the jack up the price because they know of the rebate. just my 2 cents i make metal stuff for a living though.
 

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In order to get EVCIP rebate. The invoice must be on letterhead of a licensed electrical contractor. And the ESA Certificate of Inspection, are both required.

Maybe you can do it yourself for the same money or less even after the government rebate.

But first ask your house insurer if they'll cover a fire that might be attributed to your DIY wiring, breaker and receptacle.
 

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You are allowed to do electrical work in your own home. I installed a subpanel and the EVSE myself. I still needed to get it inspected. I submitted the bills for the charger, the inspection, and the materials I needed for installation. All were accepted and I received 50% of the totals back. My EVSE with tax was $923 and I received $461.50 back from that. I can't remember what I submitted for costs to install and inspection but I also received exactly half back. I believe they will pay up to $500 for EVSE and up to $500 for installation. (ie. If your EVSE costs $2000 you will get $500 back max. If your installation costs $400 you will get $200 back). Hope this helps!
Shawn
 

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That's surprising. I read the installation piece literally as it was printed below. I guess the Ministry has relaxed their interpretation and/or their administration, or I just read it wrong. They had sure taught me a lesson about giving them the exact documentation required.

"Eligible expenses include:
• The purchase price of the charging station;
• The costs associated with installing the charging station if undertaken by a licensed electrical contractor"
 

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I wasn't sure at first so I called the Ministry and talked to them first. I guess with anything (not just charging stations) you are allowed to do your own work on your own home without being licensed. Obviously they expect you to do that with knowledge of what you're doing and they would prefer that everything was inspected. I have done work on my home in the past that was not inspected, but the EVSE required an inspection both to make sure it was installed correctly, and for them to verify it was actually installed I would imagine.
 

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There are two separate rebates - the charger and the electrical wiring.

For the charger, you have no need for an inspection - just a receipt from a valid company/EVSE model. Max is $500.00, or the cost of the unit (whichever is less).
I read on the rebate website that you have to own an EV to get the rebate. Do you have to show proof of ownership, or really just the receipt of the charger? I'm wondering because I'm in line for a Bolt, but would like to buy the charger ahead of time just in case the conservatives win the Ontario election and scrap the rebate in a couple weeks. (It's worth noting I have the paperwork saying I have a deposit on the car)
 

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You have to have purchased an eligible EV in a specific time period, so you cannot go to early on the install. I had mine done about a week after my car arrived just to be safe. I hear you on the provincial election results...
 

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I'm in the same situation. I ordered mine about a month ago. The deal says I should get it late Aug., early Sept. Here's hoping whatever party gets in they work as fast as governments typically do.
 

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I'm in the same situation. I ordered mine about a month ago. The deal says I should get it late Aug., early Sept. Here's hoping whatever party gets in they work as fast as governments typically do.
The Provincial budget is already set for the year, the earliest change you'd be likely to see would be at the beginning of the next fiscal year. I'm not familiar with Ontario, but government fiscal years often start in April.
 

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The Provincial budget is already set for the year, the earliest change you'd be likely to see would be at the beginning of the next fiscal year. I'm not familiar with Ontario, but government fiscal years often start in April.
The change could be made through an Order in Council. Worst case scenario, if there's a change in government and they're motivated to cancel the Climate Change Action Plan (in whole or part), the OIC probably wouldn't start moving until parliament's back in session in the fall and would take a bit of time to complete and enact the amendment. If it all happens this way, changing the incentive could happen by the end of this year. This would depend on how much a new government wants to change the current program/law, because an OIC would have a spotlight on it in the legislature.

As Sean noted, sliding a change in with a new budget in the spring is more likely as it can be surrounded by a bunch of other changes and reduce the opposition focus and attention on it, like the big Omnibus bills the Harper government passed to get a lot of their policies into effect.

In the end, no one really knows what will happen. But, don't be shocked if a Ford government moves quickly on this, as he's been consistently strong in his opposition to any kind of climate change legislation.
 
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