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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! Just to be up front, I've posted a similar thread in other forums of vehicles I'm interested in but I'm looking for as much information as I possibly can.

I'm leasing a 2019 Subaru Forester presently. My lease ends mid-January of 2022, which means I have anywhere from 12 to 18 months left on the lease. The reason this is 12 to 18 is because if I return the lease anytime after June of 2021, I can have the early lease end fees waived - as long as I leased or purchased another Subaru. Some catch, right? Anyway, I generally like to start my research around 12 months out, which means I can place a "factory order" or "custom order" as needed to get exactly what I want.

Commute - I live in a single-family home, so I would plan to charge in my driveway via my garage on 120V 15A (aka 5-15) outlet. This may have the means to be upgraded to a 20A 120V outlet, aka 5-20. I'm willing to spend on a 240V30A type of outlet and circuit in the future if the 120 is not sufficient but this will absolutely require panel upgrades (breaker box is completely filled up and already has been tandemed and combined as much as possible)...

My work commute is about 10 miles each way, 5 days a week in non-pandemic conditions. This commute is about 1-2 miles of Suburban driving to a 55mph highway, about 4 miles of that highway, and then another 4 miles of very urban city driving. Traffic is typically bad on one of the two ways since I work either very early or very late, so I only hit the traffic during the normal times coming or going. There are more highway routes I could take that are about 20 miles each way but end up taking around the same 25-30 minutes.

I can't charge at work, but they are considering it for the future. I'd have to pay for my own electricity. There is a nearby EVGo and Tesla Supercharger at a mall that is about 2-3 miles away from work that I could run to on a lunch break and charge if I was in a pinch.

Passengers - Typically I will have my two kids in the back either going or from school which is a short 5 minute ride, and then depending on work I'll have them in the back going to some type of sports practice. Possibly another kid if I have to help carpool. I don't need a ton of cargo room, but I do coach baseball and soccer so I need the cargo area large enough to be able to hold the gear.

Other cars - My wife drives a three row SUV that we use for vacations. We don't need this car to be a vacation car.

Other things to consider - In the summer months we tend to stay with family for a majority of it. I'll be commuting 60 miles each way when this happens. While I could charge at the destination, I'd prefer not to since I don't want to make things awkward and seem like I'm mooching (it's not my house). There is an EVGo charger about half way between work and this summer shore house that I could use regularly. How long would it take? Do I charge to, say, 80% and then leave?

So, I have concerns about charging when on the road specifically the DC charging. I know the Teslas are super, super fast... I don't want to have to be on the road at 12 AM coming home from work on a 60 minute drive and have to stop for 45 more minutes regularly.

Other cars/options I'm looking at:

1. Just buy out the Forester for around $19,000 plus taxes.
2. Consider a Toyota Venza mild-hybrid that launches this year.
3. Consider a Subaru Outback or new Subaru Forester for the low $30,000's plus taxes.
4. Consider a Toyota RAV4 Prime PHEV to take advantage of electricity's low cost and do virtually all daily driving (non-summer) with it.
5. Consider a full EV like the Bolt and deal with the infrequent need to DCFC
6. Consider a moonshot EV like the Tesla Model Y and get more range (300+ miles) and faster DCFC as needed.

Lack of adaptive cruise and lane centering functions (SuperCruise) is a little concerning. I have Adaptive in my Forester now, but not active lane centering.

Cost of PHEV seems high, because I still have to do ICE-related maintenance on time.

Thanks for your input.
 

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There are few 2020 models left, but if you can find one, the discount may get it down to between $30-35K. If you truly want an EV, You may be better off with a Kia or Hyundai, which still have the full $7.5K tax credit. If you are sure you will not be taking long trips in it, the DCFC option may be skipped for a savings of $750. I have the kinetic blue 2017 Bolt EV Premier (bought May, '17) and have logged 36K miles in it. I have done over 15 trips of >400 miles. My problems are two: no SAE-CCS DCFC (>24 kW) in my whole state, and when I do get to OH, MD, or VA, the max charging rate (55 kW) is too low. I have had NO maintenance issues. Tire rotations and one tire bought for a sidewall puncture are my only visits to service centers. One ding in the rear (other driver) took it to a body shop with good results. I love it and will think about a '21 or '22 model if it has > 100 kW charging. I will also look closely at the Volvo XC40 Recharge with its 120kW charging and ~85 kWh battery.
 

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Don't even give it a second thought. Go for the Bolt.
I disagree, give it serious thought. Your summer commute from the Shore without charging at either end will be a nightmare.

Commute - I live in a single-family home, so I would plan to charge in my driveway via my garage on 120V 15A (aka 5-15) outlet. This may have the means to be upgraded to a 20A 120V outlet, aka 5-20. I'm willing to spend on a 240V30A type of outlet and circuit in the future if the 120 is not sufficient but this will absolutely require panel upgrades (breaker box is completely filled up and already has been tandemed and combined as much as possible)...

My work commute is about 10 miles each way, 5 days a week in non-pandemic conditions. This commute is about 1-2 miles of Suburban driving to a 55mph highway, about 4 miles of that highway, and then another 4 miles of very urban city driving. Traffic is typically bad on one of the two ways since I work either very early or very late, so I only hit the traffic during the normal times coming or going. There are more highway routes I could take that are about 20 miles each way but end up taking around the same 25-30 minutes.

I can't charge at work, but they are considering it for the future. I'd have to pay for my own electricity. There is a nearby EVGo and Tesla Supercharger at a mall that is about 2-3 miles away from work that I could run to on a lunch break and charge if I was in a pinch.
Your daily commute would take about 4 to 5 hours of charging at 120V 12 amps. The stock EVSE (charge cord) is capable of being used on a 240V circuit by using an adapter. This would double the charging speed making you capable of recharging from your daily commute in 2 to 2.5 hours.

Passengers - Typically I will have my two kids in the back either going or from school which is a short 5 minute ride, and then depending on work I'll have them in the back going to some type of sports practice. Possibly another kid if I have to help carpool. I don't need a ton of cargo room, but I do coach baseball and soccer so I need the cargo area large enough to be able to hold the gear.
The Bolt should accommodate your passenger and cargo needs... I would suggest looking at one at a dealership if possible to reassure yourself of this.

Other cars - My wife drives a three row SUV that we use for vacations. We don't need this car to be a vacation car.

Other things to consider - In the summer months we tend to stay with family for a majority of it. I'll be commuting 60 miles each way when this happens. While I could charge at the destination, I'd prefer not to since I don't want to make things awkward and seem like I'm mooching (it's not my house). There is an EVGo charger about half way between work and this summer shore house that I could use regularly. How long would it take? Do I charge to, say, 80% and then leave?
If you only want to stop once a day (coming or going) and want to keep a 10% minimum buffer and charge to 60% on a typical 100 amp EVGo charger it will take you about an hour to charge from 10% to 60% on the 2017-2019 Bolt 50 min if you are at a 125 amp charger... it will take slightly less than that with a 2020. Now, if you want to stop once in each direction it actually lowers your charge time since you charge faster in the low state of charge region of the battery capacity. Charging once each way will take you 25 min for each charge, saving you 10 min over doing it all at once. Find out the cost of electricity at the place you are staying... if power is $0.10 the cost of power for a 120 mile round trip commute in the summer for a month would be around $70. Your best bet (and least expensive) would be to pay for installation of an L2 charger at the home you are staying at on the shore, and offer the home owner what ever it cost per month to charge at the summer accommodations. Using DCFC will be much more expensive and less convenient.

So, I have concerns about charging when on the road specifically the DC charging. I know the Teslas are super, super fast... I don't want to have to be on the road at 12 AM coming home from work on a 60 minute drive and have to stop for 45 more minutes regularly.
As stated above, unless you charge at the home you are staying at on the shore you will be doing a 25 min charge in each direction, or a 60 min charge if doing it all at once... seriously recommend working out something with the home owner so you pay for charging there instead of using DCFC.

Cost of PHEV seems high, because I still have to do ICE-related maintenance on time.
If you were planning on using it for all of your driving including vacations I would consider the PHEV, but since that is not the case you are better off with a long range pure BEV of some kind.

Hope this helps,

Keith
 

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Fivedoor: "Now, if you want to stop once in each direction it actually lowers your charge time since you charge faster in the low state of charge region of the battery capacity."

Although a semantic argument, if you stop "at the end" of each way, while you are doing something else constructive, that may work. But if you are charging "once in each direction (along the way)" it makes no sense to lose 1 hour/day charging. But I am sure the OP understood that.
 

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Commute - I live in a single-family home, so I would plan to charge in my driveway via my garage on 120V 15A (aka 5-15) outlet. This may have the means to be upgraded to a 20A 120V outlet, aka 5-20. I'm willing to spend on a 240V30A type of outlet and circuit in the future if the 120 is not sufficient but this will absolutely require panel upgrades (breaker box is completely filled up and already has been tandemed and combined as much as possible)...
The Bolt maxes out at 12A charging at 120V; a 20A 120V circuit doesn't provide any upgrade for its charging speed. If you really want to increase capacity with the most cost effective solution, talk to your electrician about possibly upgrading the circuit to a 20A 240V one with a 6-20 receptacle. You could use the Bolt's supplied EVSE at 240V, with an adapter, to charge at 12A 240V (doubling the charging speed), or buy an EVSE that can output 16A at 240V ( 2 2/3 times faster than the 120V speed). This assumes the wiring is, or can be replaced with, 12 gauge, and some shuffling and replacement of breakers is possible.
 

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Fivedoor: "Now, if you want to stop once in each direction it actually lowers your charge time since you charge faster in the low state of charge region of the battery capacity."

Although a semantic argument, if you stop "at the end" of each way, while you are doing something else constructive, that may work. But if you are charging "once in each direction (along the way)" it makes no sense to lose 1 hour/day charging. But I am sure the OP understood that.
He specified that in the summer he can not charge at the residence he is staying at, or at work, so he will be charging in the middle of his commute each day at an EVGo DCFC.

I agree that it makes no sense to lose an hour a day charging and that is why I said to think twice before purchasing a Bolt for his situation, unless he can install charging at the summer residence and arrange to pay the owner for the power he uses.

Keith
 

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The 120v 15a is no problemo for 10 miles each way. I did 25ish each way for a year on a 120v 15a circuit. No problemo. With such a short commute your gas savings vs ice are going to be less than somebody doing 2x or 3x the miles. That would factor in for me.

Also a 60+60 mile drive would be no range issue if you have 240v or better charging on one end @ reasonable speeds in "summer weather" IE no heater. You can even get 120+ miles range 7pm to 7am charging on the factory Chevy EVSE.

Being limited to charging halfway thru the drive would be a deal breaker though. Ice is the way for this. Personally I'd probably ditch the Subaru and get a Camry or Accord or something. Aging awd platforms scare me, but I guess if you need it you need it.
 

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Do you need the ground clearance or AWD of the Subaru?

At my electric rate of $0.10/kWh, your 120 mile round trip commute in the summer would cost about $4 per day in electricity (40 kWh). If you're staying at someone else's house, you're already mooching. Kick 'em a few bucks if you are uncomfortable taking their electricity too.

Based on what you've shared, I'd be inclined toward the Rav4 Prime. Bringing up the cost of maintenance as a negative factor is a bit misleading because the biggest cost by far of vehicle ownership is depreciation. After that, it's fuel, and then insurance. If you want to save money, you buy a cheaper car and own it for a longer duration. Eliminating a yearly $20 oil change isn't going to set you way ahead financially.

The best fit for you comes down to what your values are. If you value saving money, then buying a used Hyundai Sonata or something would make sense. If it's to not burn fossil fuels, then EV makes sense. If utility is important, that Forester, a Rav4, Prius or other medium sized vehicle probably makes sense. Have you considered the Prius Prime? It's the #2 highest selling plug-in vehicle after the Model 3 and it has a surprisingly good amount of utility. The newest iteration now has 5 seats (previous ones only had 4).

Whenever I have an important decision to make, I build a spreadsheet and list all of the factors I'm concerned with, then I assign a value to how well each option fulfills that factor, and assign a weight of importance (maybe heated steering wheel is nice to have, but not needed). For a vehicle, I'd put things like total cost of ownership, safety, reliability, comfort, utility, features, etc in there and let the spreadsheet show me which one most fulfills my wants.

If total cost of ownership is important to you, I built a spreadsheet to compare any 2 vehicles and it's linked in my sig.
 

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Just to give you some numbers based on your message:
This is only an average and from my experience in the Bolt (there are many factors that can affect these estimates, like ambient temp, highway driving speed, etc...)
Under normal driving with moderate to warm temperature, under 70mph and no rain. Colder weather (use of heater) would net less range. A/C doesn't seem to affect range much.

oem charger on 110v --> 4-5 miles range per hour
EVGO 100A charger --> 150 miles range per hour (plus the time it takes to get off your route, get to charger, and then return when finished charging)

So figure out if you could handle the 45-50 minute charge during your daily summer commute. If you could plug into a standard outlet overnight or at work, it would significantly shorten the time at DCFC.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi everyone. Thank you for your posts. I'll try to comment directly on your posts where relevant with a few thoughts at the bottom.

There are few 2020 models left, but if you can find one, the discount may get it down to between $30-35K. If you truly want an EV, You may be better off with a Kia or Hyundai, which still have the full $7.5K tax credit. If you are sure you will not be taking long trips in it, the DCFC option may be skipped for a savings of $750. I have the kinetic blue 2017 Bolt EV Premier (bought May, '17) and have logged 36K miles in it. I have done over 15 trips of >400 miles. My problems are two: no SAE-CCS DCFC (>24 kW) in my whole state, and when I do get to OH, MD, or VA, the max charging rate (55 kW) is too low. I have had NO maintenance issues. Tire rotations and one tire bought for a sidewall puncture are my only visits to service centers. One ding in the rear (other driver) took it to a body shop with good results. I love it and will think about a '21 or '22 model if it has > 100 kW charging. I will also look closely at the Volvo XC40 Recharge with its 120kW charging and ~85 kWh battery.
The Volvo looks great! I've been on the e-mail list for updates for a while now. I like the two-tone roof that reminds me of a Toyota FJ Cruiser from years ago. Chevy's upcharge for the DCFC is $750. To have the option to DCFC is worth that price! Regarding your thoughts on the Kona, it seems that these are selling for around $40,000 for the Ultimate trim. After the Federal Tax Credit, we're still looking at $32,500 - which is more than the Bolt.

I'm glad to hear of the no-maintenance issues. I'm expecting around $25-30 twice a year for tire rotations.

Don't even give it a second thought. Go for the Bolt.
I appreciate your enthusiasm!

I disagree, give it serious thought. Your summer commute from the Shore without charging at either end will be a nightmare.

Your daily commute would take about 4 to 5 hours of charging at 120V 12 amps. The stock EVSE (charge cord) is capable of being used on a 240V circuit by using an adapter. This would double the charging speed making you capable of recharging from your daily commute in 2 to 2.5 hours.

The Bolt should accommodate your passenger and cargo needs... I would suggest looking at one at a dealership if possible to reassure yourself of this.

If you only want to stop once a day (coming or going) and want to keep a 10% minimum buffer and charge to 60% on a typical 100 amp EVGo charger it will take you about an hour to charge from 10% to 60% on the 2017-2019 Bolt 50 min if you are at a 125 amp charger... it will take slightly less than that with a 2020. Now, if you want to stop once in each direction it actually lowers your charge time since you charge faster in the low state of charge region of the battery capacity. Charging once each way will take you 25 min for each charge, saving you 10 min over doing it all at once. Find out the cost of electricity at the place you are staying... if power is $0.10 the cost of power for a 120 mile round trip commute in the summer for a month would be around $70. Your best bet (and least expensive) would be to pay for installation of an L2 charger at the home you are staying at on the shore, and offer the home owner what ever it cost per month to charge at the summer accommodations. Using DCFC will be much more expensive and less convenient.

As stated above, unless you charge at the home you are staying at on the shore you will be doing a 25 min charge in each direction, or a 60 min charge if doing it all at once... seriously recommend working out something with the home owner so you pay for charging there instead of using DCFC.

If you were planning on using it for all of your driving including vacations I would consider the PHEV, but since that is not the case you are better off with a long range pure BEV of some kind.
I appreciate your concerns. Cost for electricity around this part of the country (outside NYC/NJ shore areas) is around 17 cents per kWh. I learned that when you calculate the cost of charging you also need to factor in a little extra (20% for 120V and 10% for 240V) for conversion/efficiency losses of changing the AC from your house to DC for the pack to accept - or at least that was the case with the Teslas. Either way, it appears that with $2 per gallon gas, I'd save around $500 per year in fuel comparing it to electricity, and about $1200 if it goes back up to $3 per gallon.

I'm familiar with charging details in general because of my research geared towards the Model Y, but just learning about the Bolt as a decent contender for the next vehicle. I would definitely plan to use the 120V15A outlet (5-15) in my garage on a daily basis, and if I needed a full charge, I can go about a mile and plug in at a new Electrify America CCS/Chademo station at a shopping center nearby. (It's a little more inconvenient with a Tesla as I can't use the CCS with it and there is no adapter.)

Assuming I do decide to charge at the shore house, it would certainly take the edge off. I'd be able to recover at least "one direction" of driving, around 60 miles over 12 hours or more of charging. Realistically, I'd expect that number to be closer to 14 hours depending on when my next shift starts.

Fivedoor: "Now, if you want to stop once in each direction it actually lowers your charge time since you charge faster in the low state of charge region of the battery capacity."

Although a semantic argument, if you stop "at the end" of each way, while you are doing something else constructive, that may work. But if you are charging "once in each direction (along the way)" it makes no sense to lose 1 hour/day charging. But I am sure the OP understood that.
Thanks. If I had to charge on the regular (since I'm going 120 miles round trip), I'd probably charge up on my lunch break. This would give me the range I needed to run from work, down to the shore house, and back to work the following day. Rinse and repeat. Inconvenient, yes.

Two things obviously can make this more palatable: My employer is "exploring" the installation of public chargers. It's complicated from here out though, since we're not accessible to the public (security access required) and we'd be responsible to pay any costs for electricity consumed. The second would be charging at the shore house. Even recovering 60 miles a day out of the 120 would make it less of a need to charge every single round-trip.

The Bolt maxes out at 12A charging at 120V; a 20A 120V circuit doesn't provide any upgrade for its charging speed. If you really want to increase capacity with the most cost effective solution, talk to your electrician about possibly upgrading the circuit to a 20A 240V one with a 6-20 receptacle. You could use the Bolt's supplied EVSE at 240V, with an adapter, to charge at 12A 240V (doubling the charging speed), or buy an EVSE that can output 16A at 240V ( 2 2/3 times faster than the 120V speed). This assumes the wiring is, or can be replaced with, 12 gauge, and some shuffling and replacement of breakers is possible.
That's interesting. The NEMA standards are 5-15 and 5-20 for a 120 volt circuit/outlet. You need thicker gauge wires for the 20A and the proper outlet (has one of the blades turned 90 degrees, common in new garage and bathroom installations with modern US electrical code.) The benefit is that regardless of charging, you only charge at 80% of maximum capacity for safety, so the 5-15 outlet charges at 12A for the margin of safety, which would provide 120V*12A of power per hour, or 1440 Watts, before any efficiency losses are factored in. A 5-20 outlet charges at 16A and provides nearly 2kW of power. In essence, it provides 33% more power.

And again, to restate, I cannot upgrade my panel to 240V. It is completely maxed and already has had subpanels and circuits combined onto a single "slot" - so any future new circuits or 240V circuits will require me to upgrade the panel which is estimated between $1200-1500 including the new installation of a 6-20 (240V20A) circuit.

The 120v 15a is no problemo for 10 miles each way. I did 25ish each way for a year on a 120v 15a circuit. No problemo. With such a short commute your gas savings vs ice are going to be less than somebody doing 2x or 3x the miles. That would factor in for me.

Also a 60+60 mile drive would be no range issue if you have 240v or better charging on one end @ reasonable speeds in "summer weather" IE no heater. You can even get 120+ miles range 7pm to 7am charging on the factory Chevy EVSE.

Being limited to charging halfway thru the drive would be a deal breaker though. Ice is the way for this. Personally I'd probably ditch the Subaru and get a Camry or Accord or something. Aging awd platforms scare me, but I guess if you need it you need it.
Thanks, I figured I would be okay as long as I stayed under 50 miles, since it seems like EV ownership/charging is more about how much time you can charge rather than how much are you driving... I figure on the regular I will have the opportunity to charge at least 12 hours per day as needed.

I do appreciate my Subarus - I've owned 3 now - and they do perform well in bad weather. We get snow here outside of the NYC area, but I'm in a suburban area and things are plowed really quickly. I'm not driving through mountains. The snow is not bad enough that I've been compelled to run winter tires, but when my OEM's do require replacement, I would probably consider an All-Climate tire instead of changing between dedicated winters and all-seasons (mostly a storage space concern)... At the end of the day, if I'm caught out in snow at work or have to go to work, my Subies have always got me there safely, and that generated a bit of brand loyalty from me.

I'm not a fan of Honda lately but I do like Toyota from a mechanical standpoint. However, a sedan is probably not the best option for me.

Do you need the ground clearance or AWD of the Subaru?

At my electric rate of $0.10/kWh, your 120 mile round trip commute in the summer would cost about $4 per day in electricity (40 kWh). If you're staying at someone else's house, you're already mooching. Kick 'em a few bucks if you are uncomfortable taking their electricity too.

Based on what you've shared, I'd be inclined toward the Rav4 Prime. Bringing up the cost of maintenance as a negative factor is a bit misleading because the biggest cost by far of vehicle ownership is depreciation. After that, it's fuel, and then insurance. If you want to save money, you buy a cheaper car and own it for a longer duration. Eliminating a yearly $20 oil change isn't going to set you way ahead financially.

The best fit for you comes down to what your values are. If you value saving money, then buying a used Hyundai Sonata or something would make sense. If it's to not burn fossil fuels, then EV makes sense. If utility is important, that Forester, a Rav4, Prius or other medium sized vehicle probably makes sense. Have you considered the Prius Prime? It's the #2 highest selling plug-in vehicle after the Model 3 and it has a surprisingly good amount of utility. The newest iteration now has 5 seats (previous ones only had 4).

Whenever I have an important decision to make, I build a spreadsheet and list all of the factors I'm concerned with, then I assign a value to how well each option fulfills that factor, and assign a weight of importance (maybe heated steering wheel is nice to have, but not needed). For a vehicle, I'd put things like total cost of ownership, safety, reliability, comfort, utility, features, etc in there and let the spreadsheet show me which one most fulfills my wants.

If total cost of ownership is important to you, I built a spreadsheet to compare any 2 vehicles and it's linked in my sig.
Thanks for sharing. So, since I pay around 17 cents per kWh, that would mean about $6.80 for the commute using 40 kWh - and that also doesn't factor in regenerative braking but I suppose since most of this is highway I wouldn't be doing much of that. With $3 per gallon gas, that would cost me $12-15 with the vehicle I have now.

I'm not sure if this makes sense, but depreciation isn't really a factor for me. I'm planning to purchase this next one and basically drive it until the wheels fall off. I suppose the only time it would come into play is if I was in an accident and the insurance company was trying to total it or not. So, for comparison's sake, I can throw out depreciation from all models.

Unfortunately, oil changes are far from $20 and once yearly for me. My Subaru requires maintenance every 6000 miles, which is basically every 6 months. They charge $85, which includes a tire rotation and multipoint inspection and shop fees and taxes. On my previous car, I was doing my old oil changes, but since I don't have room to store a jack, I was bringing it to a shop and having them rotate the tires for $20 anyway (and they did a free multipoint inspection as well)... By the time I factored in the cost of the oil (Pennzoil Ultra Platinum) and the genuine Subaru oil filter and crush gasket, it wasn't that far off the $85 target anyway after factoring in the cost of the tire rotation as well. I was saving around $20 to have to bring my car to a shop anyway, and I do like the peace of mind with the multipoint inspection as I don't like getting caught off guard.

Primarily looking to reduce or minimize fossil fuel use. Just done with it. Side effects are the instant torque and responsiveness and reduced maintenance that comes with an EV and hopefully better reliability (hundreds of parts vs. thousands of parts on an ICE)

Utility is quasi-important. My previous car was a Subaru Outback and that was good. The Forester is a little smaller which has its benefits in city parking and things like that, but if I had to buy another ICE, I think I would have the Outback at the top of the list over the Forester by a few tenths of a point.

I'll admit, I have not considered the Prius Prime because of the price point. I suppose I was along the lines of thinking if I was going to get a PHEV, I would just go for a RAV4 Prime as it provides a ton of extra space in comparison.

And as you said, long term cost of ownership is important. Over the course of 10 years, I'd be saving over $10,000 in fuel costs. Safety is the most important factor. I can buy another car. My kids can't buy another me.

If the DCFC is DC Level 2 > 55 kW, he will probably be OK. If DC Level 1 (<40 kW) {DCSC?} it is still a bummer.
Crazy. Some of the modern Teslas (Model 3 and Y) will charge at 250 kW on the new Supercharger v3's. That's the equivalent of 1000 miles per hour of gained charge. Granted, this doesn't maintain this steep curve beyond 50%, but that's a significantly shorter charge time.

Just to give you some numbers based on your message:
This is only an average and from my experience in the Bolt (there are many factors that can affect these estimates, like ambient temp, highway driving speed, etc...)
Under normal driving with moderate to warm temperature, under 70mph and no rain. Colder weather (use of heater) would net less range. A/C doesn't seem to affect range much.

oem charger on 110v --> 4-5 miles range per hour
EVGO 100A charger --> 150 miles range per hour (plus the time it takes to get off your route, get to charger, and then return when finished charging)

So figure out if you could handle the 45-50 minute charge during your daily summer commute. If you could plug into a standard outlet overnight or at work, it would significantly shorten the time at DCFC.
Thanks, seems like if I go the EV route, I have to figure out overnight charging on the regular.

Appreciate it all!
 

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And again, to restate, I cannot upgrade my panel to 240V. It is completely maxed and already has had subpanels and circuits combined onto a single "slot" - so any future new circuits or 240V circuits will require me to upgrade the panel which is estimated between $1200-1500 including the new installation of a 6-20 (240V20A) circuit.
Do you have an existing 240V circuit you can share? One product floating around is called the Dryer Buddy. It's an intelligent 240V splitter that plugs into the 240V dryer socket. When the dryer turns onm charging is suspended.

I'm currently doing such a setup by hand using a 240V extension cord. Like you I charge at 120V most days. It's useful to occasionally have a bit faster charge when taking multiple trips in a day.

ga2500ev
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don’t have any 240 aside from the Central AC wiring. I have gas appliances so my oven, furnace, clothes dryer, etc are all off regular 120V service.

There is a product called Quick240 which will combine two different 120 circuits into a single 240 line through use of extension cords, but that is definitely NOT ideal for long term solutions.
 

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I don’t have any 240 aside from the Central AC wiring. I have gas appliances so my oven, furnace, clothes dryer, etc are all off regular 120V service.

There is a product called Quick240 which will combine two different 120 circuits into a single 240 line through use of extension cords, but that is definitely NOT ideal for long term solutions.
Most homes are pre-wired for electric appliances when built... strange that you don't have those outlets available.

Anyway, the quick240 sounds like it would be perfect for use with the stock EVSE... 240V at 12 amps is great compared to 120V at 12 amps

Keith
 

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There is a product called Quick240 which will combine two different 120 circuits into a single 240 line through use of extension cords, but that is definitely NOT ideal for long term solutions.
And when your house catches fire and that's determined to be the cause, kiss your homeowner's insurance goodbye.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It’s been upgraded. It’s not the old knob and wiring stuff. But the breaker is maxed and from around 15-20 years ago.
 
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