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Please, let's keep this discussion on the theoretical aspects of the chemistry and density.

On some threads, there have been discussions the chemistry changes of the newer versions of the Bolt battery were made so as to be less expensive to produce. IIRC, maybe it was lowered levels of cobalt?

In any case, those who know these things, manufacturing defects aside, what are the +/- tradeoffs of the early battery design versus the current battery design.

What design changes enabled increased range in the same envelope?

Again, purely theoretical, which should be the most durable?

jack vines
 

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Again, purely theoretical, which should be the most durable?
Nickel alone would give the most energy-dense batteries, meaning cars with longer driving range, but it is unstable and reactive. Cobalt is key for boosting energy density and battery life because it keeps the layered structure stable as lithium ions get reversibly stuffed into and extracted from the cathode during battery operation.
 

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Merged where?
Here. OP created a duplicate thread that cwerdna responded to, and I merged that thread into this one. That's why you see cwerdna's suggestion to close the thread here (it was actually posted in the other thread). This thread will stay open.
 

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Nickel alone would give the most energy-dense batteries,
Considering that the LiMO2 system becomes unstable to loss of oxygen after 50% of the lithium has been removed (and 50% of M has been oxidized from the +3 state to +4), the best energy density and lowest cost would result if that 50% of M3+ ions that can't be oxidized were replaced with inexpensive, lightweight aluminum. If that is not possible, I expect that LiFePO4 will eventually become the dominant chemistry for EV batteries despite the somewhat lower energy density.
 
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