Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
The car was very accurate about mileage. It read 233 at the beginning and that's what he got. It seems that 1 kilowatt is the buffer kinda. The literature says 65 kw battery but the sticker on the battery itself says 64 kw. I don't know if that's a buffer but I know it's not the same. Lol
I have not driven my car down to the orange, I prefer green. I've watched enough videos to know what it's like. I don't want to have to think that much when I am trying to have a good time.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Watched that video yesterday. If you run out of battery, GM roadside will tow it to the closest charging station?
I have watched almost(?) every video on youtube about bolt and there is chevy sales person called dave sells chevy. He leased bolt before and recently he purchased bolt again.
He did test his vehicle to almost empty too.

 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,845 Posts
I watched that yesterday and was pleasantly surprised by the result. My 2019 could never do better than about 3.2 mi/kWh at 70 MPH. It was really pretty inefficient at higher speeds. Have there been improvements to efficiency in later model years? I was lucky to get 150 miles at 70 MPH before it was below 20% and I started thinking about finding a charging station.

Mike
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,582 Posts
Here is a tip how you can estimate the range you have left after the LOW is in the screen:
  • LOW is seen when the battery is around 7% SOC, but you can do the math with 5% SOC (when two orange bars in the DIC, your battery has at least 5% left)
  • you have the mi/kWh number

Math for range left : 5% x kWh x mi/kWh
The Bolt EUV has 65 kWh battery.

He had 219.3 miles driven when he showed up the mi/kWh numbers (3.6).
Car Vehicle Speedometer Automotive design Motor vehicle

If we do the math as mentioned above : 5% x 65 x 3.6 = 11.7 miles - this would be the MIN number on the GOM. The Middle number on the GOM = MIN x 1.18 = 13.8 miles

He ended up with a total of 233.7 miles driven which reflects pretty much the estimation above (219.3 + 13.8 = 233.1)

The method above is one you can use if you find yourselves in a situation where Low is on the screen and have no idea what's left as range.

For the easiness of computation, I multiply by 3 (60 x 5% = 3) the miles from mi/kWh and use this number to have an idea of where I am at vs the destination. If the numbers don’t match, I reduce the speed until they match… or I am screwed.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
I found out when the range meter goes to LOW and no longer shows remaining range estimated you can open the my Chevy app and see what you have. Unfortunately it does not auto update as you drive you have to manually request an update.
 

· Registered
2022 Bolt EUV Nov build
Joined
·
9,285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Or you can just read it off the OBDC reader app like TorquePro and CarScanner.
 

· Registered
2018 Bolt EV Premier
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
If I really wanted to know what the car thinks the range is when it hits LOW, I would park the car somewhere safe and turn it off. It’ll show the range on the dashboard. Using a smartphone app while driving might be unsafe and doing calculation will be inaccurate without OBD-II readout.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,582 Posts
If I really wanted to know what the car thinks the range is when it hits LOW, I would park the car somewhere safe and turn it off. It’ll show the range on the dashboard. Using a smartphone app while driving might be unsafe and doing calculation will be inaccurate without OBD-II readout.
And why would you want to know the exact number really ? The range is an estimation... can't understand why people want .9999 precision on an estimated number. Which can very well change in a split of a second if you have to climb a cote or you face a strong head-wind. IMO it's better for people to learn how to interpret or work with ballpark numbers, it will help them a lot.

P.S. I wouldn't stop the car on a highway only to know I have about 11 miles before empty. If I stop and then move again, the 11 miles will become 7 miles just because I'll use more energy to get up to the speed I was doing just before stopping.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
If it's not that accurate wouldn't it stand to reason that you don't want to deliberately drive that low.
But I do think that understanding how to approximately know what to do is reasonable. But most people don't want to be doing calculations. When I look at the dcfc that's out there at this time you better have a plan. Which speaks to our road trip state of health.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,582 Posts
If it's not that accurate wouldn't it stand to reason that you don't want to deliberately drive that low.
The accuracy of the GOM prediction is based on present and past driving conditions. So, as long as nothing changes in the future, you can bet your money on the GOM value.
GM did a great job in letting people know that it's time to refill, when only 14% SOC is left and the green blocks become orange.
 

· Registered
2018 Bolt EV Premier
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
And why would you want to know the exact number really ? The range is an estimation... can't understand why people want .9999 precision on an estimated number. Which can very well change in a split of a second if you have to climb a cote or you face a strong head-wind. IMO it's better for people to learn how to interpret or work with ballpark numbers, it will help them a lot.

P.S. I wouldn't stop the car on a highway only to know I have about 11 miles before empty. If I stop and then move again, the 11 miles will become 7 miles just because I'll use more energy to get up to the speed I was doing just before stopping.
I get the point that having the knowledge of calculating the range estimate would be beneficial. However, all three variables in the calculation carry some error margins which add up. I’ve seen LOW happening at as low as 3.9% SoC, and the new “64kWh” battery’s actual usable capacity was more like 61kWh in my case. Lastly, the mi/kWh number is for the entire trip, so depending on when the trip was reset it may not be as current. So even if the real GOM number is somewhat accurate, the calculated number may be several miles apart.

So I think it would be better to simply assume that you’d have less than 10 miles to go when it hits LOW if you want to ballpark it on the safe side.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
And why would you want to know the exact number really ? The range is an estimation... can't understand why people want .9999 precision on an estimated number. . . .
Because people know how far away things are from them? So they know if they can make it the 8 miles home or 3 miles to the next charging station or if they need to slow down or call their wife to push them home with the ICE? Because at this point not even an estimate of range is shown?
. . . Which can very well change in a split of a second if you have to climb a cote or you face a strong head-wind. IMO it's better for people to learn how to interpret or work with ballpark numbers, it will help them a lot. . . .
I think this is actually what's being discussed. Getting an accurate-enough number of kWh remaining and doing the math to get an accurate-enough range estimate. And one would surely hope that anyone ambitious and intelligent enough to do this will also be intelligent enough to understand the impact of road conditions ahead of them for the next 10-ish miles.
. . . P.S. I wouldn't stop the car on a highway only to know I have about 11 miles before empty. If I stop and then move again, the 11 miles will become 7 miles just because I'll use more energy to get up to the speed I was doing just before stopping.
In low power mode, I don't think you can waste that much on acceleration. But I'll agree that hopefully nobody is foolish enough to slow down from highway speeds just to check the range AND then accelerate back to highway speeds. Of course, anyone in this situation hopefully is already driving well below highway speeds to bolster their range.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
The accuracy of the GOM prediction is based on present and past driving conditions. So, as long as nothing changes in the future, you can bet your money on the GOM value.
GM did a great job in letting people know that it's time to refill, when only 14% SOC is left and the green blocks become orange.
Yes I think the gom is reasonably accurate and I understand how to reasonably calculate the orange warning. But I don't think a number of people will consider this a small thing. And a number of people will just avoid this by looking for a charge likely to soon and being discouraged by broken dcfc.
My wife showed me a couple clips from tic tock where this guy was asking people fairly easy questions,math questions to and the answers would lead me to believe that electric car companies have their work cut out for themselves.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,582 Posts
Because people know how far away things are from them? So they know if they can make it the 8 miles home or 3 miles to the next charging station or if they need to slow down or call their wife to push them home with the ICE? Because at this point not even an estimate of range is shown?
IMO people already know what the range is before the LOW appears in the screen. Don't forget, we are talking about 7% SOC when Low is up, and from my experience, 99.999% of the people don't go below 10% SOC for obvious reasons : you never know if the DCFC is up and you want a buffer to maybe be able to go elsewhere. Unless you are driving home, you know you have 5 miles to get there and you knew already what the Min number was above the distance to home.

Most apps I know of use the 10% buffer (ABRP and MyChevrolet) to arrive at a DCFC. I think ABPR doesn't allow you to go lower than 9% SOC. The same MyChevrolet app is limited to 7%. So... in the real world experience, knowing what Low means in range, is non-important in 99 out of 100 cases.

In low power mode, I don't think you can waste that much on acceleration.
You'll see that "Low power mode" is not really a low energy usage. I suggest you to lookup the video above, around 9:30 min, in "Low power mode" he can still accelerate enough to use 20-24 kW of the battery.
So yeah... it's not the Leaf and its turtle mode when the Bolt EV enters the "low power mode".
 

· Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Off the top of my head initially there could be a program that will help people get through this ordeal. Like I said there are a fair amount of people that will not accept this way that everyone is describing. The can't you figure it out method. How long before super reliable charging network is ready. The very small number of ev people will be those in here. Maybe the hybrid will transition it through. But how long are we taking.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,582 Posts
Yes I think the gom is reasonably accurate and I understand how to reasonably calculate the orange warning. But I don't think a number of people will consider this a small thing. And a number of people will just avoid this by looking for a charge likely to soon and being discouraged by broken dcfc.
Most new comers to the world of EV will use applications like ABPR or MyChevrolet to plan their long trips. These two applications have imbedded by default the 10% SOC battery capacity to destination. I think sometimes people worry about things that they will never experience in real life.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top