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You have to understand an oddity of some devices. The GFCI in a hair dryer is on the plug usually. That doesn't mean that the outlet for it is on a GFCI. Same with EVSE. The OUTPUT of the EVSE is protected by specification. It is not a GFCI that can be tested however. If you were to remove the plug from outlet and touch a prong that is where you'd want the circuit breaker to be a GFCI and possibly a combo A/GFCI.
When using a range or dryer it is unlikely that one touches the plug much. More and more locations require newer safety items.
 

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..So now I'd like to replace the plug. Is it possible to do this and preserve the EVSE's IP66 rating?
I nailed it ! ;)
Way up thread I said the internal 'Pin to Wire' crimp on the EVSE may be making the heat.
Congrats, Tim! You found the source of the heat!

Just whack off the old connector and install a new one on the clean remaining wires.
It sounds like IP66 is related to the 'Enclosure':
"protection against particles and a high level of protection against water. Following strict IP66 enclosure standard protecting rating rules"

Just keep the plug and outlet out of the rain.:rolleyes: Mount things with a 'Drip Loop' in the wire to the EVSE.

You can measure 'Voltage Drop' across each 'Pin/Socket' connection if there is access on each side.
That can then calculate how much resistance is at each wire's connection.
(This can also be used with troubleshooting switches.)

I don't see the usefulness of measuring 'Harmonics/Noise' on a circuit.
Every appliance has a 'noise signature', except pure resistance devices.
What can you do if you find a lot of noise? Some sort of filtering? What will that benefit?

Good luck. Keep us posted.
 
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Congrats, Tim! You found the source of the heat!
I won't be totally convinced until I feel the EVSE in operation with a new plug. I think what threw me off earlier is that my other, better EVSE gave me a high temperature warning on its display, but I'm not sure I actually felt any excess heat.

Also, I have formed the opinion that even Leviton receptacles are OK as long as you treat them kindly. IOW, don't plug and unplug frequently, and don't draw more than 32 amps.
 

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No. It has a 1-year warranty and I bought it in 2019.
If you purchased it with a credit card, some provide extended warranty coverage. Mine adds 2 years. Maybe you could just get in under the wire 1 yr factory plus 2 years CC?
 
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I won't be totally convinced until I feel the EVSE in operation with a new plug. I think what threw me off earlier is that my other, better EVSE gave me a high temperature warning on its display, but I'm not sure I actually felt any excess heat. ...
Right.
Where is the temp sensor in EVSE's that show an internal temp on the display?
Is it in the enclosure or in the wall connector like some OEM EVSE's?

Either way, you got the problem on the run! Keep us posted!
Using an IR temp sensor to test how the connections are doing is the way to go!
 

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I just had to replace the nema 1450 plug on my AmazingE fast 32a charger for my Bolt. The plug would get really hot when charging. At first I thought it was the connection on the blade from the itself from the receptacle. So I got a cheapish 1450 surge protector on Amazon and it was still hot. I took the AmazingE fast apart and found it was using 10 gauge wire on the supply side from the factory which should be ok up to 30amps ... not 32amp and under perfect/good conditions. I desoldered the cable and replaced it with a 6 gauge 1450 range cord and it is now slightly warmer than ambient when charging. If you buy an RV surge protector you can also limit the number of actual insertions to the wall receptacle and then just get a new surge protector when it gets too worn or you can take apart and crimp down the receptacle blades. Also side comment, make sure you torque your breakers, receptacles, split bolts etc.
 

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... Also side comment, make sure you torque your breakers, receptacles, split bolts etc.
And as seen in a how to vid posted here:
Do a torque - wiggle the wire - retorque - wiggle - retorque.
This is especially important with stranded wires, but helpful with solid core wire also.
 

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I actually got out my torque wrench and found that I was stripping the screws in the service panel before the specified torque was reached.
Yikes!
The head slots or the threads?

I'm helping to install a 32A EVSE in a few days. CB panel to the hardwired EVSE.
I guess I'll use my 'elbow click torque wrench' method.
This is all on the DL. Don't tell the authorities... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
In case anyone is interested, the bad plug reads "XUANHUA, XH208, E257089, U-30-3".

Also, I noticed that the cord to the plug is a smaller diameter than the cord to the J-handle. Does that make sense to anyone? The cord diameters are the same on my other, better EVSE.
 

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Also, I noticed that the cord to the plug is a smaller diameter than the cord to the J-handle. Does that make sense to anyone?
Yup. Different insulation material and/or insulation ratings will have very different thicknesses.

 

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That is some funky rendering. Is this the browser's, image's or forum's fault?
Tire Automotive tire Human body Font Automotive wheel system

If you right click and select "Open Image in New Tab" then the text is legible.
 
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