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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am making a 14-30 pigtail adaptor for my stock EVSE as per the instructions on carcharging.us/adapt/bolt-240.php
I have the ground wire connected, does it matter which hot goes on either post? I don't want to screw this up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. It happened to be faster to ask here than to look on youtube. Besides most of the videos that come up on the search were for combing two separate circuits or changing them outright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm only intending to use this when it's too cold outside for the 120/v12a to charge and keep the battery warm.
 

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I kept my car plugged in for like 4 months last winter on 120/12. (couldn't get up my rural driveway) Maybe the odd attempt at the driveway earlier and later. It got dang cold too. It survived.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've been using mine since 2017 on 240V. Welcome to the forum by the way.
Thank you. I'm not exactly doing as the guide said. I'm attempting this with a 2 cords that are both rated 300v 60c, one is a 6' dryer cord, the other is a 12ft extension cord. I rent and can't count on my landlord to install a new 240 on the outside, without charging me an arm and a leg. And I'm worried about this cord overheating. I'll assume that if I plug this in and it doesn't trip the breaker that it's spliced correctly. Then I will let it sit for a bit hooked up to the EVSE without plugging it in to the car, then I will hook it up on 8a, for a bit, then feel the cord for excess heat. If it's cool to the touch, I'll jump it up to 12.
 

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The dryer cord should be fine. Get a good solid 12ga or even 10ga extension. Well for 12' maybe 12ga would be fine.
The EVSE and car would see all 12A. The 8A/12A choice is only when on 120V.
 

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I kept my car plugged in for like 4 months last winter on 120/12. (couldn't get up my rural driveway) Maybe the odd attempt at the driveway earlier and later. It got dang cold too. It survived.
Not sure about your driveway but have you tried driving up backwards? This puts more weight on the front wheels.
 

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Not sure about your driveway but have you tried driving up backwards? This puts more weight on the front wheels.
 

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Thank you. I'm not exactly doing as the guide said. I'm attempting this with a 2 cords that are both rated 300v 60c, one is a 6' dryer cord, the other is a 12ft extension cord. I rent and can't count on my landlord to install a new 240 on the outside, without charging me an arm and a leg. And I'm worried about this cord overheating.
The dryer cord would be fine, and if the extension cord is 12 gauge, it will not be problematic. The one thing that could cause an issue is if the extension cord has lit ends (those little bulbs inside the plug or receptacle that glow orange to show connection). Those tend to burn out if you have 240V going through it. I've had 16A 240V going through a 40' 12 gauge SJOOW cable, and it only got a little warm to the touch.
 

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Danny said: "I'm attempting this with a 2 cords that are both rated 300v 60c, one is a 6' dryer cord, the other is a 12ft extension cord."

Most or all standard A/C cords are rated 300V or higher. The voltage rating is an indication of the type/amount of plastic insulation that is in the cable - around each of the wires. This is cheap to achieve, and isn't really relevant to overheating. What determines heating (and is more expensive to produce) is the thickness of the metal wires in the cable, which is indicated by the "gauge" of the wire. This will be marked on the cable with an "AWG" (American Wire Gauge) rating. Your extension cord is probably marked either "16 AWG" or "14 AWG" or "12 AWG". The dryer cord is probably marked "10 AWG" or "8 AWG".

Smaller AWG number means thicker wire, which means less heating. To be good and safe, both your cords should be 12 AWG or thicker, i.e. either 12 AWG or 10 AWG or 8 AWG. You should avoid 16 AWG. Shorter cords are preferred over longer cords. You could probably get away with a 14 AWG if it was short, though others here may rightly disagree.
 

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With 240, the two hots are just two 120v leads out of phase. Meaning that when one hot wire is +120, the other is -120 and vice versa. So other than one leg being "time shifted" by about 8ms relative to the other (in a 60hz power grid), they are exactly the same.

Mike
 

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Not sure about your driveway but have you tried driving up backwards? This puts more weight on the front wheels.
I never tried that! Where were you last winter?! :) I tried the traction control on and off to no avail. The OEM tires are pretty crappy though. I sold the place this year though so that's history.
The driveway was a wild ride with my Cherokee 4x4 with proper snows on (open front diff and limited slip rear). And walking it down in 4-Lo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
No 12 or 10 gauge extension cords at my Lowes, not that don't cost over $50. I bought a 5-20r cord end, and 12/2 indoor wire with ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I can't use that, it's a four prong outlet, that pigtail is 3 prong and it's far too short.
 

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(I just used it to avoid buying a $40 heavy gauge extension cord & for the edison receptacle).
 

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No 12 or 10 gauge extension cords at my Lowes, not that don't cost over $50. I bought a 5-20r cord end, and 12/2 indoor wire with ground.
If from what I understand you bought a length of "Romex" house wire be aware that it is not rated outdoor use and is not waterproof. Besides being illegal for an extension cord it will soak up moisture and if you nick the jacket and insulation can give you a shock. If you are going to go this route would have been better to buy the grey UF underground burial 12/2. Should be plugged into an outlet with a GFCI. Still illegal as an extension cord but at least a little safer for you. Please don't shoot the messenger. Maybe you can slide some hose over the wire to protect it?
 
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