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Granted. Our garage outlet is wired for a 90 amp circuit, but I have a 40 amp breaker for our 32 amp onboard charger. Way safer than one wired for 50 amp service, and fused with a 50 amp breaker. Much better to have more wire than you "need", and a breaker closer to your load.
Electrical code requires a breaker of higher capacity than the expected load, typically 25% more. A 32 amp EVSE requires a 40 amp breaker. a 40 amp EVSE requires a 50 amp breaker. a 48 amp EVSE would require a 60 amp breaker. Any circuit that expects a 50 amp load might be OK with a 60 amp breaker, but might require moving up to 70 amp, of course with the correctly sized wiring for all.
 

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I bought this Max Green 5 pc. adapter cord set 2 years ago for my 2014 Volt, in case I was stranded some place away from public chargers.
Wait, wait,,,:unsure:
the only way to get stranded in a Volt is if the gas tank is also empty, right?
 

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I bought this Max Green 5 pc. adapter cord set 2 years ago for my 2014 Volt, in case I was stranded some place away from public chargers.
Have you ever had a chance to use it in the emergent situation you considered when purchasing it?

ga2500ev
 

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Electrical code requires a breaker of higher capacity than the expected load, typically 25% more. A 32 amp EVSE requires a 40 amp breaker. a 40 amp EVSE requires a 50 amp breaker. a 48 amp EVSE would require a 60 amp breaker. Any circuit that expects a 50 amp load might be OK with a 60 amp breaker, but might require moving up to 70 amp, of course with the correctly sized wiring for all.
All of this is qualified as a continuous load rating, defined as usage for 3 hours or longer. It's OK to run an intermittent load of less than 3 hours all the way up to the breaker limit.

ga2500ev
 

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All of this is qualified as a continuous load rating, defined as usage for 3 hours or longer. It's OK to run an intermittent load of less than 3 hours all the way up to the breaker limit.

ga2500ev
From what I could find online, it's dependent on the type of load. Some loads, such as welders or HVAC, require a larger safety buffer, and I doubt they would be good for use at the breaker limit. But for an EVSE, I would expect it to be a smooth, steady load, so that would probably be OK.
 

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All of this is qualified as a continuous load rating, defined as usage for 3 hours or longer. It's OK to run an intermittent load of less than 3 hours all the way up to the breaker limit.
I'm sort of dubious about that 3 hour rule. If I set my EVSE on a 2h59 timer, I don't see a qualitative difference from setting it to a 3h00 (or even a 3h30) timer.

I guess the new NEC caps portable EVSEs at 32A as well though, which further reduces risk (since there are no NEMA 14-40 outlets, most of those will be running off of 14-50s).
 

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Wait, wait,,,:unsure:
the only way to get stranded in a Volt is if the gas tank is also empty, right?
Right. My mistake. I should have explained that I bought the Max Green charge cable, with 5 different plug types, 2 years ago when I owned a 2014 Volt. 3 months ago, I traded the Volt in on a lease of a 2022 Bolt, that I DEFINITELY NEED all those plug options, in case I'm stranded somewhere away from public chargers. The way the Bolt is dropping miles after the night temperature low is around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, that is a real possibility. Here where I live in KY, there are only 4 DC Fast Charge stations in the whole State, and they are all further apart than the 82 mile radius (or the163 mile round trip that is 80% of the original EPA of 259 miles) that GM has advised us to stay within without recharging.

I should have done more research before leasing the Bolt, because it has proved to be very impractical for my situation. I'm 67 and retired, and even I don't have the extra time to waste dealing with the charge issues. I've basically parked the Bolt for the next 33 months of the lease, and started riding my bicycle everywhere I can, while still making monthly lease payments. I'm helping to save energy, but that's not the way I was expecting to do that. It's a crazy mixed-up World we live in today. Needless to say, I have applied for the Recall Repurchase/MSRP Swap Program.
 

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1... I've basically parked the Bolt for the next 33 months of the lease, and started riding my bicycle everywhere I can, while still making monthly lease payments.

2...Needless to say, I have applied for the Recall Repurchase/MSRP Swap Program.
1. You Da'Man !
2. Good Luck. You definitely deserve it!
 

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It is within code to use a 40a breaker with a 14-50 receptacle.
That strikes me as a bit of a dumb measure that's based on the assumption that most 240V equipment will be more-or-less permanently plugged into the outlet. If these outlets were used in as laissez-faire a manner as 120V outlets then people would constantly be plugging in equipment that made the breaker pop because they assumed it would work if the plug fit. That would mean that the breaker is now the single point of failure because you no longer have the protection of people having to work hard to plug the wrong kind of thing into the wall. If the breaker fails to trip then you've got a serious problem.
 
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