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Good day all,

I test-drove a 2019 Premier yesterday - wow is the best way to describe it!

I do have a question: does the car support cabin temperature "pre-conditioning", i.e. while plugged in at home (or wherever), can the car's HVAC be set to heat the cabin to a desired temperature and not use the HVB to do so (keeping the battery SOC at the current level)?

I tried to find the owner's manual online to no luck so I thought I would ask here.

Thanks!
 

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Good day all,

I test-drove a 2019 Premier yesterday - wow is the best way to describe it!

I do have a question: does the car support cabin temperature "pre-conditioning", i.e. while plugged in at home (or wherever), can the car's HVAC be set to heat the cabin to a desired temperature and not use the HVB to do so (keeping the battery SOC at the current level)?

I tried to find the owner's manual online to no luck so I thought I would ask here.


Thanks!
You can find the manual here:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/dmln7qqper8af9x/2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV Manual.PDF?dl=0
 

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...does the car support cabin temperature "pre-conditioning", i.e. while plugged in at home (or wherever), can the car's HVAC be set to heat the cabin to a desired temperature and not use the HVB to do so (keeping the battery SOC at the current level)?
Yes, as long as the charger that you're using can supply enough power to run the heater (it takes around 6kW at full power). In practical terms, that means a 240V/30A or 32A charger. If you use a charger with less capacity then the deficit comes from the HV battery.

Preconditioning needs to be started manually (from the key fob or from the MyChevy app while you have OnStar basic service) - as far as I know it can't be scheduled to start at a certain time. I use my key fob which is strong enough to reach the car in my detached garage around 30 feet from the house. I don't use KeyPass, I just rely on the direct RF signal from the fob.
 

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Yes, as long as the charger that you're using can supply enough power to run the heater (it takes around 6kW at full power). In practical terms, that means a 240V/30A or 32A charger. If you use a charger with less capacity then the deficit comes from the HV battery.
Thank you!
 

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Yes, as long as the charger that you're using can supply enough power to run the heater (it takes around 6kW at full power). In practical terms, that means a 240V/30A or 32A charger. If you use a charger with less capacity then the deficit comes from the HV battery.

Page 40 of the manual says simply when plugged in. Interesting that it wouldn't use the OE EVSE as a power source. It doesn't state the difference.


Jeez. A quick search...alright. Could be way more than 1440W to run everything. I do so wish they would certify the OE one for 240V if only to draw 2880W anyway for a little less battery use.
 

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Page 40 of the manual says simply when plugged in. Interesting that it wouldn't use the OE EVSE as a power source. It doesn't state the difference.


Jeez. A quick search...alright. Could be way more than 1440W to run everything. I do so wish they would certify the OE one for 240V if only to draw 2880W anyway for a little less battery use.
I'm coming from a Ford Fusion Energi that can pre-condition using only the wall 120V cable's draw and leaves the HVB alone (assuming it's fully charged).
 

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To answer the original question - Yes, you can preheat the car from the keyfob or your smartphone. You can also plug the OEM EVSE into 240v with an adapter to double the charge rate.
 

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I do so wish they would certify the OE one for 240V if only to draw 2880W anyway for a little less battery use.
Well they didn't certify it, but they did design it to run off 240V. The issue is that it needs a different plug to run off 240V in North America, and they probably didn't want to bother with the extra cost and work to deal with interchangeable plugs. The EVSEs delivered with European and Korean variants of the Bolt come with plugs (also not interchangeable) for the 240V AC power used in those regions.

I've been charging my Bolt with the OEM EVSE at 240V for almost 2 years now and it works great.
 

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Well they didn't certify it, but they did design it to run off 240V. The issue is that it needs a different plug to run off 240V in North America, and they probably didn't want to bother with the extra cost and work to deal with interchangeable plugs. The EVSEs delivered with European and Korean variants of the Bolt come with plugs (also not interchangeable) for the 240V AC power used in those regions.

I've been charging my Bolt with the OEM EVSE at 240V for almost 2 years now and it works great.

Yes thank you I'm aware of all that. I would feel more comfortable for warranty and insurance reasons if they were to provide a replacement sticker on the brick that indicates that it can work for 240V. It's up to the end user to connect it however they see fit but simply that the brick can do it.
Upon dropping out of warranty then I would set it up in a heart beat. But with two factors against the idea...I'd just rather not.
You see the indication on lots of products including computer power supplies. Flip the switch to 240 and you're good. In this case connect an adapter. Albeit non-standard, against code, but one factor out of the way...warranty...with a sticker.
Or a letter. Dear Bolt owner: etc.
Until then...4 mpkwh it is. Or of course L2, L3 options.
 
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