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Had a ChargePoint L2 home charger installed recently. I live near Sarasota, FL--a contenda for Lighting Capital of the World.

I have a home elec system-wide lightning arrestor and nearby strikes are not uncommon.

Anyone heard of a home lightning strike and effects while L2 charging? How risky is being connected during a storm?
 

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We also get lightning storms during summertime here on Long Island.
I have not plugged in if a storm was forecast for that evening, and have unplugged when pop-up storms have suddenly appeared.
The Bolt may be protected... but why chance it?

There was a post on the gm-volt forum a while back IIRC where someone did sustain substantial damage to his plugged in Volt from a near-by lightning strike.
 

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I would have thought that was the point of the EVSE, and the electronic in the car that say what rate to charge at. Preventing too much from getting to the car.

On a side note, I had a whole house surge protector put in when we had the breaker box upgraded last year. Won't prevent brown outs, but should prevent lightning hits from breaking electronics.
 

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Anyone here want to pretend that some sort of in-car surge suppressor or EVSE power relay with a 1/8" airgap is going to stop a 100,000,000 (one hundred million!) volt surge from a near-by lightning strike from passing through to the vehicle? Consider it had enough energy to jump down from a cloud floating 20,000'-50,000' above the earth- once it hits copper wire it goes wherever it wants!
 

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Anyone here want to pretend that some sort of in-car surge suppressor or EVSE power relay with a 1/8" airgap is going to stop a 100,000,000 (one hundred million!) volt surge from a near-by lightning strike from passing through to the vehicle? Consider it had enough energy to jump down from a cloud floating 20,000'-50,000' above the earth- once it hits copper wire it goes wherever it wants!
That's exactly what I'm getting at. I know the Leaf EVSE uses varistors because I cut the ones rated to operate at 120v out, and soldered in ones designed to operate at 240v. Those tiny things don't stand much chance of stopping a lightning bolt.

If you want the most protection from lightning strikes, go off-grid and build a faraday cage around your house.
 

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^ easier to just unplug during the storm :D

Although the idea of building a Faraday cage around your house does sound pretty neat!
 

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Never though about this until now, but it should have crossed my mind when a storm short circuited my electric toothbrush once. Assuming you check the weather at least once a week, unplugging the Bolt shouldn't be a problem.
 
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