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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After waiting for 4 weeks for delivery of the Bolt in Colorado, I pulled my order today and requested my deposit returned. With the help of you all, and all the informed data that I have reviewed as a member of this forum over the past month, it seems to me the 2017 Bolt has some considerable challenges and GM will hopefully change or fix them in 2018.

For me an EV is not the best option and will stick with an ICE car until the technology and infrastructure becomes better in terms of range, speed of charging and infrastructure to charge on long trips.
 

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Sorry it didn't work out for you.

FWIW- the M3 will also have "Loss of 30-35% of range in Cold climates". All EV's experience this loss due to cold ambient temps- none are immune.
 

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After waiting for 4 weeks for delivery of the Bolt in Colorado, I pulled my order today and requested by deposit returned. With the help of you all, and all the informed data that I have reviewed as a member of this forum over past month, it seems to me the 2017 Bolt has some considerable challenges and GM will hopefully change or fix them in 2018. I refer to of course:

1) a comfortable driver seat (should I have to buy a cushion?)
2) difficulty in getting a windshield replacement (due to special wiring only to be done at a Chevy dealership?)
3) Blow out of tires and again difficulty and very high cost with finding replacements?
4) Loss of 30-35% of range in Cold climates (I refuse to just use heated seats and steering wheel)
5) Cheapness of interior materials (doesn't look like a $40-45k car)

I can go on and on, and don't mean to be negative for those who have already bought them. However, my needs was to drive an EV for 18-36 months until either my Tesla Model 3 arrives or another manufacturer comes up with a long range EV. This is very disappointing to me having to walk away but for $45k, I was expecting what appears on paper, a well designed and well built car.

Thanks for listening.
Looks like you were looking for an excuse. I doubt the Telsa has a different performance in cold weather. That is the physics and chemistry of electric batteries. Difficulty in replacing a windshield? Really? Better check on # 3 for cost of replacing Tesla tires. Can't argue with 1 or 5, but I am lucky enough to find the seat comfortable. I am sure the Tesla Model 3 will be very late and very cool and more expensive than moonbeam Musk has promised.
 

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In this locale the dealer is under no obligation to return deposit until 90-days have transpired with no delivery, from date of original vehicle purchase agreement/bill of sale.
 

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1) Fair point, the seat is hit or miss, for me it is not an issue, I can understand it is an issue for some. Did you actually sat in one?
2) Like all new cars, windshields are only available to OEM until there is volume large enough for the aftermarket to step-in. The whole "wiring issue" is BS, we are taking about the Camera that need to be aligned and there is nothing to it. I am pretty sure the Model S/X/3 also do not have aftermarket support.
3) OEM Tires are actually pretty cheap: Tire Rack at $113
4) All EV will do that, including the Model S/X/3
5) I paid $29k for my premium after incentives and before taxes. Also You are talking about interior materials and comparing to Tesla? Really? Tesla has TERRIBLE interior beyond the giant iPad.

If you are holding up for the Model 3 you are going to be sorely disappointed. Tesla has consistently over promised and under delivered, the first couple of years they will only deliver $70k to $60k model 3s and by the time they will open for the low-end model the base price will have climbed, just as they did for the Model S. Also new to the mix is Tesla's insurance rates: https://www.theverge.com/2017/6/5/15739262/tesla-insurance-premiums-aaa-claim-rate-repair-costs

Now I do agree that the EV landscape will have drastically changed in 3 years, but for now the Bolt is the best EV at any price.
 

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I think #4 is typical for all EV's, not only for the 2017 Bolt. The seats are suitable for my anatomy, and I am not sure what makes the interior "cheap", or what to expect from the interior that is not dismissed as "cheap".

I think the interior looks very cool and fresh, the LT upholstery is very decent, and the instrument cluster and the rest of the read-outs are tastefully futuristic without being too in-your-face nerdish. Besides, with the real-life prices, it's probably $35K net or maybe $37K on the road.

If you are going for M3, and didn't sign up for it a year ago, you probably won't see yours until 2019, but then again, good things come to those people who are willing to wait :)
 

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Looks like maybe an EV isn't for you for many of the reasons mentioned above.

Many find the seat comfortable, some don't.

Many new cars have specialized windshields. Particularly those with desirable features like driver assist, rain sensors, etc. I would expect the Model 3 windshield to be specialized and difficult to replace as well.

The tires are not particularly expensive or difficult to replace. Costco carries them among many others. Like many other specs, the tires on the Model 3 are a complete unknown. They could be even harder to source.

If a loss of range in cold weather is a deal breaker, you won't ever own an EV. Nature of the beast. ICE cars also lose range, but have the advantage that 70% of the energy is gasoline is turned into heat that can be captured to keep the cabin warm. If you need 200+ miles of range in Colorado winters, the Model 3 will not work for you either.

Interior? You might be in the market for a Model S (used?). The Model 3 will be far more spartan than any other Tesla. Until we see an actual production car it is still an unknown, but may not be much different than the Bolt.

Good luck with your search.
By most accounts, the Bolt is indeed a well designed and well built car. They emphasized performance and range over creature comforts. If your priorities are the other way, the B-Class Mercedes is worth a hard look, along with the e-Golf and maybe even the Focus Electric. Perhaps even the LEAF 2.0 will be a better choice for you. But if winter range loss is a deal breaker, time to just move along. Better to think of it as bonus range outside of winter?
 

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I'm going to have to agree with everyone here and say those really aren't much over the top reasons. The seat, you won't know how comfortable it is until you really get in there and drive it. Tires are tires and tires will be tires. These aren't crazy tires and finding replacements isn't much of an issue. The windshield thing is subjective, you're going to have the same problem with majority of new cars with technology.

Either way, hope you find what you're looking for, but with those reasons, you're gonna have some difficulties.
 

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3) OEM Tires are actually pretty cheap: Tire Rack at $113
FYI, these are the Michelin Energy Saver A/S tires, but they are NOT the self-sealing ones that come with the Chevy Bolt. Have not been able to find the self-sealing version at any other retailer yet. But, I keep looking.

Scott
 

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FYI, these are the Michelin Energy Saver A/S tires, but they are NOT the self-sealing ones that come with the Chevy Bolt. Have not been able to find the self-sealing version at any other retailer yet. But, I keep looking.

Scott
The link provided IS the Bolt version of the tire. (there are 3 version "Normal", "Volt and "Bolt")

People are under the false impression that there is some kind of goo in them, there is not. The "self sealing" feature (beyond marketing BS) come from the rigid construction required for the Low Rolling Resistance, where they can handle a very small puncture (VERY SMALL). The only goo is the one that come in the GM inflator kit, just like in a can of "Fix a Flat".

Here someone with a flat, it is just a normal tire (Select, copy and paste)
http://www.mych
evybolt.com/forum/viewt
opic.php?f=10&t=5950
 

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According to the official "Michelin Self Sealing Technology" video... "Michelin Self Sealing tires contain a stable flexible material that can instantaneously fill any holes in the tread" and "if a nail pierces the tire and drops out the product will fill up the hole".
Sounds like more than simply "rigid construction" to me.... :confused:



Skip to 1m50sec to go past the drama of people getting flats and to start the explanation of the "Self Sealing Technology"...
 

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According to the official "Michelin Self Sealing Technology" video... "Michelin Self Sealing tires contain a stable flexible material that can instantaneously fill any holes in the tread" and "if a nail pierces the tire and drops out the product will fill up the hole".
Sounds like more than simply "rigid construction" to me.... :confused:



Skip to 1m50sec to go past the drama of people getting flats and to start the explanation of the "Self Sealing Technology"...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-oYjuaTZpE
My question is, if you get a nail or screw and the tire doesn't go flat, should you have it repaired like a normal tire, or just extract the debris, keep driving and skip the repair?
 

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Well, that's a good question !

A field repair usually consists of filling the hole with the goody wick, a proper repair means removing the tire from the rim and applying a vulcanizing patch from the inside.

I don't see how the self-sealing tires could be successfully repaired from the inside with a vulcanizing patch?
 

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My question is, if you get a nail or screw and the tire doesn't go flat, should you have it repaired like a normal tire, or just extract the debris, keep driving and skip the repair?
In that case its best if you take your tire to a shop. Let them dismount it, inspect, and make a judgement call on if a patch is needed. Odds are they will patch it just to be on the safe side... can't blame them.
 

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The OEM Michelin tires that are on every bolt as it rolls out of the factory are self-sealing.

The same size Michelin tires available through Tire Rack, Costco, etc... are not self sealing.

One has a self sealing flexible material coating on the inside, the other doesn't

It's like saying the Bolt LT is the same car as the Bolt Premier... yes same car... different options.
So, same tire.. different options....
 

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I had a flat tire on my first day with my Bolt. There was a screw embedded in the tire and it did not self seal but the screw did not fall out on its own. It was a continuous slow leak so I could drive a few miles after putting air into it. I stopped at the nearest Chevy dealer on my way to work. Onstar was also notifying me to get the tire checked. They called GM at my insistence just to be absolutely certain that plugging the tire as they do with regular tires was proper. GM said yes plug the tire. 8000 miles later the plugged tire is fine. It might not be a bad idea to carry a small 12v air pump in the trunk. One came with my Mitsubishi i-miev but I never had an occasion to try the included tire sealant. I was told it would ruin the tire pressure sensor if I ever had to use it so it was probably better to have the tire plugged than try the goop.
 

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^ I don't have a tremendous amount of confidence in the self-sealing goo/whatever myself.
I carry a plug kit (several vulcanizing wicks/tool and rubber cement) and a 12v tire pump I got from Costco.
 
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