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Expecting my '23 EUV in about 10 days. I have a 240V outlet with an adapter to allow my Clipper Creek EVSE to plug in and charge my Volt at 240V level 1 (8 or 12 amps location-based). If I plug the EUV's EVSE in that same way, what will the DIC / APP display?
 

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Expecting my '23 EUV in about 10 days. I have a 240V outlet with an adapter to allow my Clipper Creek EVSE to plug in and charge my Volt at 240V level 1 (8 or 12 amps location-based). If I plug the EUV's EVSE in that same way, what will the DIC / APP display?
It depends on what your Clipper Creek EVSE is rated for. If it's a 32 amp unit, you'll see about 6-7 kW of charging power. If it's 40 amps, you'll get about 9.6 kW. If you have some switches set in the Clipper Creek to limit charging to 8 or 12 amps, that's all you'll get and the dash will show 2.8 kW (12 amps), although the dash rounds the number with no decimal point, so your 2.8 kW might show 2 or 3 on the dash.
 

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It depends on what your Clipper Creek EVSE is rated for. If it's a 32 amp unit, you'll see about 6-7 kW of charging power. If it's 40 amps, you'll get about 9.6 kW. If you have some switches set in the Clipper Creek to limit charging to 8 or 12 amps, that's all you'll get and the dash will show 2.8 kW (12 amps), although the dash rounds the number with no decimal point, so your 2.8 kW might show 2 or 3 on the dash.
The Clipper Creek was OEM for the 2017 Volt - 12 amp max with a 120 plug but 240V capable. That EVSE will be included when I trade in the Volt. I will be using the OEM dual power EVSE that comes with the EUV to charge the new Bolt. I was just wondering if the DIC or app will show charging at 240V when I am using the 120 V plug connected to a 240V outlet.
 

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I'm uncertain if the CC unit requires a plug change to use on 240v, like the factory EVSE that comes with the EUV does. But assuming it just accepts 240v through the NEMA 5-15 plug, you'll still only see 12 amps, so that's 2.88 kW at 240v. Since your EUV will be capable of charging at 11.5 kW (48 amps), you're going to charge much slower than when using a more powerful EVSE. However, depending on your personal use case, that may be more than enough for the distance you drive in a day.
 

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I'm uncertain if the CC unit requires a plug change to use on 240v, like the factory EVSE that comes with the EUV does. But assuming it just accepts 240v through the NEMA 5-15 plug, you'll still only see 12 amps, so that's 2.88 kW at 240v. Since your EUV will be capable of charging at 11.5 kW (48 amps), you're going to charge much slower than when using a more powerful EVSE. However, depending on your personal use case, that may be more than enough for the distance you drive in a day.
Thanks for that. I drive 99% electric on the Volt so I shouldn't need level 2 on the Bolt. Still haven't decided if I will have Chevy pay for the 14-50 outlet or take the EV-Go credit.
 

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I already had a 40 amp EVSE, so it was a no brainer to take the EVGo credit. I will say that there's few stations I can use the credit at near me, so I haven't used them much. Every station near me is only 50 kW, so even the Bolt can't reach full charging speed on them. But if you travel much, it's nice having the flexibility of using the credit if a station is available near your route.
 

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I already had a 40 amp EVSE, so it was a no brainer to take the EVGo credit. I will say that there's few stations I can use the credit at near me, so I haven't used them much. Every station near me is only 50 kW, so even the Bolt can't reach full charging speed on them. But if you travel much, it's nice having the flexibility of using the credit if a station is available near your route.
Also good on Chargepoint. A lot of L2 is CP, at many workplaces even. So the credit could be quite useful to some folks.

Chargepoint DCFC is becoming quite common in my area, it seems to be the preferred route hosts go with when getting state grants. These are 62.5kW or 125 kW typically, and very reliable, and are often free or low cost. I used one in Avon, CO a few weeks ago, the city sets the rates at $.15/kWh which is really hard to beat!
 

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Yeah, my most commonly used ChargePoint stations are free for a time period, usually 2 or 4 hours. I haven't seen any CP DC stations in my area yet, but maybe some are coming. Many Wallgreen's stores have Blink stations, but their displays are almost always impossible to read, usually due to sunlight fading the plastic screen. Even when the screens face north, they just seem to weather away for some reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
As a retired surgeon, details and attention to details are paramount.
When they wired your unit, they should have tested it completely to your satisfaction. Coming out a second time to correct the issue ,hopefully, is a learning experience.
I was not there for the full duration of the install and trusted the team to do their job. They didn’t. It’s been rectified. And yes, I hope they learned a bit from this.
 

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I tell my guys to never walk away until you prove it's working. Wiring an outlet wrong could be safety issue and termination of all involved. I think it's a severe safety issue.
You got that right. Any electrician worth anything knows better than to leave a job before confirming proper operation.
I probably would report this electrician to Q-Merit, they may take him off the recommended list.
 
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