Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
JuiceBox Pro 40 with JuiceNet: WiFi-equipped 40 Amp UL Listed Electric Vehicle Charging Station (EVSE) with 24-foot cable and NEMA 14-50 plug

I ordered this JuiceBox charger yesterday. I need to find an electrician to install the plug. Are there specific qualifications that I need to look for in choosing an electrician? Are there questions I should ask about this installation? I know you guys are probably rolling your eyes but I want to make sure the charger works properly and my house won?t burn down. Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
No, there's no specific qualifications needed. Installing a new receptacle is a common procedure and any decent electrician would be able to do it regardless of the receptacle size. It doesn't matter what gets plugged into it. I would just confirm that the wire/cable they use is the proper gauge for a 50A circuit and that they're not trying to cheap out on the copper.

If this going to be a new circuit then make sure that they pull the permits, which generally requires them to be licensed. If you're not electrically-savvy then the city inspection should give some additional assurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
If this going to be a new circuit then make sure that they pull the permits, which generally requires them to be licensed. If you're not electrically-savvy then the city inspection should give some additional assurance.
Depending. My approach is to go with whatever they say, if they insist on permits no problem, if they don't mention then I don't worry about it. My experience based in California, your area may be different

I've done a lot of work on my houses and have found that the licensed work I hire (plumbing, electrical, HVAC, Solar) have always been better and more careful than the inspectors* Usually they have little idea, they just chat you up and give it a cursory look. One guy for a AC mini-split just looked, pulled the circuit breaker and plugged it back upside down (Why? I think he was just looking for something to do). One of my plumbers told me the story that he was contracting for the city with underground sewer. Code is you have to trench and fill around the pipe with gravel to account for ground movement and earthquake (the gravel helps protect the pipe from breaking). The city workers didn't bother and he called them on it, but their response was "we're City, we can do whatever we want".

Now having said that the first thing people will talk about is if you sell your house you'll want everything permitted. Not so (again at least when I've sold houses). All you need to do to release liability is that you disclose your work. On my first house which was a 100 yr old fixer upper I didn't know anything about permits and did a ton of work. I actually wrote a 50 page document, and paid for the best inspection I could get myself and gave it up front. When they signed off on the house they knew everything I had done and what was not permitted. They still bought, thereby shouldering the liability.

Really permitting is a great way for the city to make money. Licensed contractors have their reputation and their work ethic to answer to and as long as you pick somebody with both you have the best service you can ask for. But if you want permits, go pay for them and the hassle of getting a monkey out to glance at your work.

* With one exception, on the solar I hired a company that's been doing it for 25 years and were excellent, but I was impressed that the inspector was on his toes and downchecked it at first. It was just some minor tweaking on the grounding from the panels, due to lightning strike considerations he had some slightly different ideas on how to go about it.

** Somebody will surely mention insurance, on that front what I see is that if you use a licensed contractor and the company can determine that the work as the origin of the claim, they may go after them for damages. Which is another reason why contractors are so careful - liability (for which they are also insured for). I'll note that if you burn your house down because you did something stupid like smoke in bed, they'll still pay up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
How would I know if I needed a new circuit?
<shrug> depends on what you have already but you probably need a new circuit given the power requirements. I'd suggest a 6AWG wire on a 60A breaker, that will give you headroom for any future EVSE charging and you could throw in a wall plug or two to boot.

Another point on safety of electrical circuits, I'll note that the weak point of circuits is after the plug socket, not before. Everything in the wall is hardwired and encased in termination boxes, but in the house people do all sorts of crazy stuff, and it's the same circuit. Further all the complication comes from the electronics and stuff you plug in, that you know nothing about. So I see people get worked up about the electrical work in their house, but as long as it's not totally incompetent that's not usually the part you need to worry about.

Edit: and unless you plan on using the EVSE as a portable, I'd recommend hardwiring it. You should be able to get a pigtail from eMotorWerks. Hardwired is a better connection than a plug in every way except portability. But if you don't want to bother than the plug is fine too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
Edit: and unless you plan on using the EVSE as a portable, I'd recommend hardwiring it. You should be able to get a pigtail from eMotorWerks. Hardwired is a better connection than a plug in every way except portability. But if you don't want to bother than the plug is fine too.
If you read his question, you'll find he already bought a 40A unit with a plug.

Anything over a 50A circuit is most likely a waste of money. The difference in charge time between 40 and 48A is negligible and unlikely to be worth the expense of later swapping to a more powerful EVSE (and removing the 14-50R and hardwiring the unit)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
If you read his question, you'll find he already bought a 40A unit with a plug.
If you read my answer, you'll see I addressed that :nerd:

Anything over a 50A circuit is most likely a waste of money. The difference in charge time between 40 and 48A is negligible and unlikely to be worth the expense of later swapping to a more powerful EVSE (and removing the 14-50R and hardwiring the unit)
Again if you read carefully, you'll see I'm suggesting considering the whole circuit such as the possible desire to have a 120V outside or inside plug too. I have an outside EVSE on 6AWG/60A and run a big computer lap and the EVSE off the same circuit.

My only point is I see home owners/contractors cheap out for the minimum necessary to accomplish the job, whereas for a small extra outlay (going to a larger gauge wire) can potentially have a solution that gives them more benefit. The biggest cost is labor, sizing circuits larger rarely costs that much and allows much more flexibility. My contractor neighbor put 20A circuits on all of the branches of his house (like 30 of them!) I thought that eminently sensible and wished I had been buying my house as the first owner and being allowed to make this specification. For the measly cost of going 14AWG to 12AWG you get circuits that will basically never trip on you in the middle of the night.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The reason I decided on a plug vs hard wire is that I expect we will be here a couple more years and then will be relocating. I wanted to be able to easily take the EVSE along. This house is small, all electric and was built in 1984.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
If you read my answer, you'll see I addressed that :nerd:



Again if you read carefully, you'll see I'm suggesting considering the whole circuit such as the possible desire to have a 120V outside or inside plug too. I have an outside EVSE on 6AWG/60A and run a big computer lap and the EVSE off the same circuit.

My only point is I see home owners/contractors cheap out for the minimum necessary to accomplish the job, whereas for a small extra outlay (going to a larger gauge wire) can potentially have a solution that gives them more benefit. The biggest cost is labor, sizing circuits larger rarely costs that much and allows much more flexibility. My contractor neighbor put 20A circuits on all of the branches of his house (like 30 of them!) I thought that eminently sensible and wished I had been buying my house as the first owner and being allowed to make this specification. For the measly cost of going 14AWG to 12AWG you get circuits that will basically never trip on you in the middle of the night.
An EVSE requires a dedicated circuit, so adding a 120V outlet outside would be on a completely separate circuit. Not sure what a "big computer lap" is? Lab? And why on earth would you want it on the same circuit as an EVSE?

I've never had an issue with breakers tripping on a 15A circuit with 14 ga wire. Proper design while paying attention to the number and location of outlets (and preferably have separate lighting circuits) is a much better approach than oversizing components. Poor/lazy design practices can indeed be "solved" by throwing money at the problem, but why not design so it isn't a problem to begin with?

It is not "cheaping out" to install a 50A circuit to service a car that will draw a maximum of 32A.

You suggest a 60A circuit. Why stop there? If 60 is better than 50, then would 80 or even 100 be even better still? Why not bring 3 phase 480 in "just in case"? DCFC would make charging even faster - it is only money after all....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Please don?t put a 60A breaker on just any #6 wire. NM-B is only rated at 55A. THHN is rated higher, but the rated terminal temperatures of the breakers ultimately determine how circuit capacity is determined. Ie 50A on #6 wire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
If you have not already checked with your electrical company for rebates, you should do so. Some will pay most of the cost of installing an EVSE (some include the EVSE). Also there is a 30% federal tax credit for the EVSE and its installation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Hello, installing the new receptacle is a simple procedure and almost any qualified electrician should do this work properly.
Just curious. Any particular reason you brought this thread back from its 3 year grave? It's likely that the OP is long long gone.

ga2500ev
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top