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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any documentation, or is able to point me to documentation that shows that a Bolt caught on fire AFTER the owner limited the maximum charge to 90% and limited the minimum charge to 30%?

If this has happened, I will definitely begin the process to get GM to buy the car back immediately. I've been pondering and worrying about what I want to do for the past several weeks and finally came up with the answer. If any Bolts have caught on fire after implementing the charging limits, I am not keeping the car. If all the Bolts that had fires were charging close to full or to full and discharging to near empty then I will keep the car until GM replaces my battery, providing it happens within 6 months.

Looking forward to hearing replies!

Thanks,
Jerry
 

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There is the timeline thread that describes the known fires, and also links to an article on Electrek that describes what we know so far.

Timeline thread

Electrek article

There is no known case of a Bolt that always remained within 30% - 90% state of charge and caught fire. We also don't know the full charge/discharge history of every Bolt that has caught fire. Regardless of charge / discharge history, the cause of the fires appears to involve the presence of defects in the battery. Limiting the state of charge to 30% - 90% reduces the risk of those defects manifesting in a fire, but it does not remove those defects (if they exist in a particular battery).
 

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Does anyone have any documentation, or is able to point me to documentation that shows that a Bolt caught on fire AFTER the owner limited the maximum charge to 90% and limited the minimum charge to 30%?

If this has happened, I will definitely begin the process to get GM to buy the car back immediately. I've been pondering and worrying about what I want to do for the past several weeks and finally came up with the answer. If any Bolts have caught on fire after implementing the charging limits, I am not keeping the car. If all the Bolts that had fires were charging close to full or to full and discharging to near empty then I will keep the car until GM replaces my battery, providing it happens within 6 months.

Looking forward to hearing replies!

Thanks,
Jerry
I’ve also been pondering and wondering for weeks- it’s become an obsession. Each new Bolt fire pushes me closer towards the edge. I don’t want to get rid of the car, but at some point enough becomes enough.
 

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I’ve also been pondering and wondering for weeks- it’s become an obsession. Each new Bolt fire pushes me closer towards the edge. I don’t want to get rid of the car, but at some point enough becomes enough.
I use math to weigh risk. It's the only reasonable course.
 

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I use math to weigh risk. It's the only reasonable course.
"Only" and "reasonable" both leave some room for debate. :)

You can apply math to many situations, but understanding how to interpret the numbers, along with an understanding of which numbers are relevant requires more than just the math.
 

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There is the timeline thread that describes the known fires, and also links to an article on Electrek that describes what we know so far.

Timeline thread

Electrek article

There is no known case of a Bolt that always remained within 30% - 90% state of charge and caught fire. We also don't know the full charge/discharge history of every Bolt that has caught fire. Regardless of charge / discharge history, the cause of the fires appears to involve the presence of defects in the battery. Limiting the state of charge to 30% - 90% reduces the risk of those defects manifesting in a fire, but it does not remove those defects (if they exist in a particular battery).
Wrong, the VA one in May was at 70% charge. Staying in that range does not prevent fires, it supposedly reduces the chances.
 

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"Only" and "reasonable" both leave some room for debate. :)

You can apply math to many situations, but understanding how to interpret the numbers, along with an understanding of which numbers are relevant requires more than just the math.
It works with rockets.
 

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It works with rockets.
Indeed! But when working with rockets, you have a (somewhat) closed environment, meaning you have knowledge of almost, if not all, variables. In the real world, there will variable that constantly change, and may be outside of your control. It's that darned human factor that is so hard to account for.
 

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Wrong, the VA one in May was at 70% charge. Staying in that range does not prevent fires, it supposedly reduces the chances.
Yup. Staying in the 90% to 30% range is good, but doesn't undo past damage. Quitting smoking at 60 is good, but doesn't undo 45 years of damage.

And to continue the smoking analogy, some of our Bolts have the cancer causing, mutated cell.
 

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Wrong, the VA one in May was at 70% charge. Staying in that range does not prevent fires, it supposedly reduces the chances.
To be fair, he said "There is no known case of a Bolt that always remained within 30% - 90% "
That car was at 70% when it burned, but that doesn't mean it always remained in that range...

That said, my personal belief is that all of that is about decreasing, not eliminating, the risk of a fire.
I think if GM believed that using those ranges would "STOP" all fire risk, they'd push that out as a fix.

If someone needs a 0% risk of a Bolt fire, they need to not have a Bolt... Only way to guarantee that.
(And even then, I suppose a Bolt could park next to your house/car so you'd still have some risk. ;-)
IMHO
 

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Wrong, the VA one in May was at 70% charge. Staying in that range does not prevent fires, it supposedly reduces the chances.
Are you referring to the May 1, 2021 fire in Ashburn, VA? The owner reported frequently discharging to 15%, which is outside the guidelines. I think OP was asking if there was a known case of a Bolt that stayed within the guidelines and caught fire. There is not a known case of that yet, but we also don't know the charge / discharge history of all the Bolts that have caught fire.
 

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As far as I see most of Bolt fires happened in the southern States: California, Arizona, Georgia, Florida etc. None in Canada.

Do you think the fires have something to do with hot climate or just there have been more Bolts sold there?
 

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Are you referring to the May 1, 2021 fire in Ashburn, VA? The owner reported frequently discharging to 15%, which is outside the guidelines. I think OP was asking if there was a known case of a Bolt that stayed within the guidelines and caught fire. There is not a known case of that yet, but we also don't know the charge / discharge history of all the Bolts that have caught fire.
How many people to date have NEVER taken their Bolt below 30%? And how many have NEVER charged to 100%? If those charges increase the likelihood of a fire, then everyone with a Bolt has already done it. I have 98K miles on mine and have charged to 100% many times, and have been down to 3% a couple of times as well. In fact I went to 3% back in January on a trip, because my car would not charge past 90% due to the interim recall software.
 

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How many people to date have NEVER taken their Bolt below 30%? And how many have NEVER charged to 100%? If those charges increase the likelihood of a fire, then everyone with a Bolt has already done it.
Not everyone. Our 2017 has never been below 30% and never been charged to 100%. It has been used locally, parked in the garage on the charger, set to Hilltop Reserve. So far, so good.

jack vines
 

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How many people to date have NEVER taken their Bolt below 30%? And how many have NEVER charged to 100%? If those charges increase the likelihood of a fire, then everyone with a Bolt has already done it. I have 98K miles on mine and have charged to 100% many times, and have been down to 3% a couple of times as well. In fact I went to 3% back in January on a trip, because my car would not charge past 90% due to the interim recall software.
I would just point out that in the May 2021 example, the owner didn't say that he discharged once or a few times to 15%. Rather, it was "typically charged when it got down to 30 miles of range" (roughly equivalent to 12-13% - source). In fact, it was Electrek's investigation (Sean Graham) of this particular fire that led to the tidbit from GM that many of the known fires had a pattern of deep discharge, full recharge, or both.

That's the thing about patterns. It's not a hard and fast rule - it's a pattern that seems to reveal something about the underlying risk. It's also fair to say that the pattern only matters in the presence of the defects. An owner might regularly discharge deeply and recharge to full and never experience a fire - because that Bolt doesn't have a defective battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There is the timeline thread that describes the known fires, and also links to an article on Electrek that describes what we know so far.

Timeline thread

Electrek article

There is no known case of a Bolt that always remained within 30% - 90% state of charge and caught fire. We also don't know the full charge/discharge history of every Bolt that has caught fire. Regardless of charge / discharge history, the cause of the fires appears to involve the presence of defects in the battery. Limiting the state of charge to 30% - 90% reduces the risk of those defects manifesting in a fire, but it does not remove those defects (if they exist in a particular battery).
I bought the 2021 Bolt in June of this year. I probably charged it to full (before the recall) at most 3-4 times. Never let it run down lower than around 50 miles. If my car has the battery defects, I wonder how much risk I added to the equation simply by doing what the car should have been able to handle without a problem. I think if I hear of either one 2021 Bolt catching fire or I learn that a Bolt caught fire and the owner never charged beyond 90% or never discharged below 70% I will move the car to an outdoor parking space, lease a car and get a good lawyer. California, where I live, has one of the strongest Lemon-Laws in the country and I plan on taking full advantage of it if GM doesn't come through within a few months for us. I am annoyed, no doubt, because I traded in what should have been a perfectly good 2017 Bolt as I was told the 2021 does not have this battery issue. Not only is there a fire-risk, but this also involves false advertising, which is a form of fraud. The car is supposed to get ~259 miles a charge, more or less, but that is clearly impossible now. When I contacted my dealer (Novato Chevrolet), at three different times they basically said get lost, "we don't know any more than you do and we can't help you at all." They are taking absolutely no responsibility for selling me a car under false pretenses. The more I think about how GM and my dealer are behaving, the more likely I am to get myself a tough attorney and go from there. I hate litigation, but GM and Novato Chevrolet are backing me into a corner, threatening our lives and home and selling defective products.
 

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How many people to date have NEVER taken their Bolt below 30%? And how many have NEVER charged to 100%? If those charges increase the likelihood of a fire, then everyone with a Bolt has already done it.
We don't do either more than a couple times a year. I confess to doing both, to check capacity, since the first fire recall.
 

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I bought the 2021 Bolt in June of this year. I probably charged it to full (before the recall) at most 3-4 times. Never let it run down lower than around 50 miles. If my car has the battery defects, I wonder how much risk I added to the equation simply by doing what the car should have been able to handle without a problem. I think if I hear of either one 2021 Bolt catching fire or I learn that a Bolt caught fire and the owner never charged beyond 90% or never discharged below 70% I will move the car to an outdoor parking space, lease a car and get a good lawyer. California, where I live, has one of the strongest Lemon-Laws in the country and I plan on taking full advantage of it if GM doesn't come through within a few months for us. I am annoyed, no doubt, because I traded in what should have been a perfectly good 2017 Bolt as I was told the 2021 does not have this battery issue. Not only is there a fire-risk, but this also involves false advertising, which is a form of fraud. The car is supposed to get ~259 miles a charge, more or less, but that is clearly impossible now. When I contacted my dealer (Novato Chevrolet), at three different times they basically said get lost, "we don't know any more than you do and we can't help you at all." They are taking absolutely no responsibility for selling me a car under false pretenses. The more I think about how GM and my dealer are behaving, the more likely I am to get myself a tough attorney and go from there. I hate litigation, but GM and Novato Chevrolet are backing me into a corner, threatening our lives and home and selling defective products.
Rather than going to your dealer, you would probably have better chance of resolution (getting a loaner, buyback, etc.) by calling the Chevy EV concierge service at 833-EV-CHEVY. Others report that those lines are overwhelmed right now, and the process for a buyback moves slowly (sometimes months).
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Rather than going to your dealer, you would probably have better chance of resolution (getting a loaner, buyback, etc.) by calling the Chevy EV concierge service at 833-EV-CHEVY. Others report that those lines are overwhelmed right now, and the process for a buyback moves slowly (sometimes months).
I've tried contacting GM. It's pointless at this time. As you stated above, the lines are overwhelmed and GM is not responding to my attempts to contact them. Neither is the dealer.
 
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