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Discussion Starter #1
Hello people. I have bought a used 2017 Bolt LT a week and a half ago. After having read the owner's manual and having driven it for a bit, I have a few questions. Here they are:

  • What's the best way to charge the vehicle? Charge it as many times as possible or wait until the charge gets to E.G. 40% and then charge it? Also, what's the upper optimal percentage of charge, 80%, 90% or 100% using a Level 2 (240 volts) charger?
  • Is it worth installing Mychevyapp if I have a Bolt LT?
  • How do I know I have KeyPass?
  • What's the optimal tire pressure?
  • Does the charger plug lock while the car is charging and the car is locked (like in the Kona EV)?
  • Are there any precautions for charging while it rains?
As you may have guessed, this is my first EV.
 

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What's the best way to charge the vehicle?
The best way, is to charge the vehicle where it meets your needs.

Do you have a long commute every day? (may need to charge every day)
Do you have tiered rates for your electricity? (may need full 32 amp L2)
Are you planning to own the vehicle for a long time? (consider 40-90% SOC, 90 because its a 2017, 80 for later MY)
Is it going to see extreme temperatures (stored indoors vs outdoors)? (needs to be plugged in)
Are you going to precondition the vehicle before departure? (will need to be plugged in)
Is having regen always available important? (set to hilltop reserve)

Is it worth installing Mychevyapp if I have a Bolt LT?
Don't have it. Don't miss it. Use key fob to remote start. I occasionally use mychevrolet.com.
How do I know I have KeyPass?
The car should have it. The phone may not or may not be compatible. I don't use it. You're not missing much based on comments in this forum.
What's the optimal tire pressure?
Per manufacturer's recommendation, it's 38 psi. But, if the ride is too rough for you and you can take the range hit, 35 psi will work. Other's crank up the pressure for a long road trip for increased range. 42 psi or so works.
Does the charger plug lock while the car is charging and the car is locked (like in the Kona EV)?
For the EVSE, some have the capability to add a lock so the button release is disabled. There's also an alarm setting that can be set. The DCFC locks for safety reasons, but can be disconnected if the session is stopped.
Are there any precautions for charging while it rains?
You might want an umbrella for yourself. The car doesn't care too much. The car won't initiate the power unless it senses a good electrical connection, including a ground.
 

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Probably a good idea to keep it between 30 and 70% as much as you can. Or even 20 to 80 is good.

For the odd road trips obviously you can top it off and run it down as needed to make your schedule.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the answers and sorry for my delay.

I don't have a long commute. Actually, I don't use the car most days because I can walk to go to work, to go downtown, etc. I just use it to do groceries, occasionally to pick friends up and (though I still haven't done it yet), to drive 100-300 km to go hiking (this happens once or twice a month). For most times, I'll use the Hilltop Reserve option, unless I have to drive longer distances.

Now, I have another question. I have read that the 12V battery can be quite capricious. So, seeing as I don't use the car every day, should I get one of those gadgets that measure the 12V battery state of charge (E.G. Palumma 24W/4.8A Dual USB Car Charger, 12V to USB Outlet with Cigarette Lighter Voltage Meter LED/LCD Display Battery Low Voltage Warning (Black):Amazon )? Is there anything else I should do to make sure the 12V battery doesn't get depleted? Also, when the car is off but the radio is on, does this use the main battery pack or the 12V battery?

Finally, going back to the main battery pack, I saw a Youtube video saying that some 2017 Bolts had some issues with the battery pack and, to make sure you don't have one of those, you should drive the car until you have about 10%. If you don't lose any range at that particular time, then you should be fine. Any thoughts?
 

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The Bolt requires so little thought or maintenance, we here on the forum have to spend most of our time picking the flyshit out of the pepper to find something to discuss. As to the 12-volt battery being "quite capricious", I'd counter that's not true at all. The Bolt will have less 12-volt battery trouble than most any current ICE. My friend with a new Beemer has to put a trickle charger on it any time he plans to park it for more than a week; and BTW, a new BMW 12-volt battery is $750 and has to be installed by the dealer.

The best evidence of good design is requiring no compromises in the interface. The Bolt just goes about transport without any thought or extra effort; in fact, it's the most effortless car to operate I've ever driven.

A Bolt engineer told me GM product managers had as their prime directive a current GM ICE owner should be able to test-drive, buy and own a Bolt without any special instruction. That's why what I consider a design flaw was deemed necessary; dumb-D is the default mode, requiring an extra shift into L.

jack vines
 

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Finally, going back to the main battery pack, I saw a Youtube video saying that some 2017 Bolts had some issues with the battery pack and, to make sure you don't have one of those, you should drive the car until you have about 10%. If you don't lose any range at that particular time, then you should be fine. Any thoughts?
By now, most of those should have been resolved by the recall to recalibrate the BMS and\or replacing the faulty cells. It is possible one may have ignored all of that if they mainly do short trips and keep the SOC above 50% or so. Your dealer should be able to look up vehicle records to verify if yours was addressed.
 

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The Bolt requires so little thought or maintenance, we here on the forum have to spend most of our time picking the flyshit out of the pepper to find something to discuss. As to the 12-volt battery being "quite capricious", I'd counter that's not true at all. The Bolt will have less 12-volt battery trouble than most any current ICE. My friend with a new Beemer has to put a trickle charger on it any time he plans to park it for more than a week; and BTW, a new BMW 12-volt battery is $750 and has to be installed by the dealer.

The best evidence of good design is requiring no compromises in the interface. The Bolt just goes about transport without any thought or extra effort; in fact, it's the most effortless car to operate I've ever driven.

A Bolt engineer told me GM product managers had as their prime directive a current GM ICE owner should be able to test-drive, buy and own a Bolt without any special instruction. That's why what I consider a design flaw was deemed necessary; dumb-D is the default mode, requiring an extra shift into L.

jack vines
One of the things I like about the Bolt is the UI is about as common as an ICE. It doesn't take much for a new owner or driver to step in and know what to do.

This is not a knock on Tesla, their approach to using the touchscreen to control everything is a nice "geek" feature, and no doubt not something you regularly have to tinker with. But it seems a little intimidating to an unfamiliar driver.

Having driven for 40+ years, I am sort of programmed to use the conventional buttons. Sure, I would adjust, but my wife gets anxious around new tech. The first time she drove the Bolt, she was apprehensive until I told her, look...it has a steering wheel, accelerator, brake pedal, start\stop button, blinkers, windshield wiper controls, and cruise control just like any other car. It took her all of about 3 seconds to settle in and drive. I then threw a curveball and had her shift into L for a downhill stretch, she got it immediately and thought it was pretty cool.

For all the things GM could have done to design the Bolt with next-gen tech and interfaces, there is something to be said for keeping things as similar to the rest of their fleet as they did. For one, the sales guy was able to instruct me on the use of all the common controls (which differ a bit from past cars since it has been 20+ years since I owned a GM). He literally knew next to nothing about EV in particular, but the rest was a breeze for him to explain. The other benefit is, I suspect many of the components are already manufactured for the entire line of GM cars and trucks, so no need to re-invent the stuff that is not essential for EV drivetrains. I am sure that helped keep the costs down considerably.

I agree with the statement of it being the most effortless car to operate, and would add it is one of the most effortless to maintain as well. Aside from tires, wiper blades, and washer fluids, there is really nothing I have had to think about. That is quite welcome having driven an Audi A6 for 5 years...it required $1000 or more every time I went in for oil changes, there was always something wrong with that car!
 

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I agree with the statement of it being the most effortless car to operate, and would add it is one of the most effortless to maintain as well. Aside from tires, wiper blades, and washer fluids, there is really nothing I have had to think about. That is quite welcome having driven an Audi A6 for 5 years...it required $1000 or more every time I went in for oil changes, there was always something wrong with that car!
I have a relative who's been in the retail car business all his life, including Audi, Bentley, R-R, Aston Martin and Maserati. "Never own one of these after the warranty expires. If you can't afford a new one, you sure-as-shite can't afford a used one."

jack vines
 

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Used Volk-Audi-Group cars are scary for sure. There is a reason used prices tank on them. If you're good at DIY repair work I think is the exception.. that might work out well for those types of people.

I would lease a Volkswagen just for the fact that they are cheap as chips. Price out a lease on a base Golf sedan... its less per month than your gasoline bill will be. Return after 36 months rinse repeat. Other than a Volks lease I wouldn't touch a VAG vehicle.
 
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