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This device is so simple, you could build yourself. So long as you have two 120v circuits in your garage that are on different legs in the breakerbox, this will work. Run the hot from one to one side of a 220v receptacle and the hot from another 120 circuit to the other side of the same 220v receptacle. Worst case? No juice because both are fed from the same leg of 120v. Best case: your car charges 12amps at 220v.

So I figure 2 120v 14 gauge extension cords, a 220v receptacle and a plastic junction box from lowes.... $30 tops.

or you can buy this: https://www.quick220.com/blog/charging-your-ev-with-a-quick-220-voltage-converter/
 

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Yes. This has been mentioned in several threads here. You can see the one I made, and used for some time before getting our JuiceBox. You can also see the adapter for using it with a 240 volt outlet.

My favorite was Terry Hershner, who rode his Zero motorcycle across the US several times, a few years ago. He had a picture of his Zero parked in a second floor apartment, running his 240 volt charger off two 120 volt wall outlets.
 

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Just be sure that the two 120v outlets are both wired the same, and neither of them have the Hot and Ground crossed vs. the other.

Get a cheap outlet tester if you expect to do this in more than one place.
 

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The cost of an in garage wiring / dedicated circuit is about $200 - $350 to do it right. And with that, you can get the full 32A. The cost of jerry-rigging is huge since if something went wrong and you had a fire, insurance won't pay out.
 

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The cost of an in garage wiring / dedicated circuit is about $200 - $350 to do it right. And with that, you can get the full 32A. The cost of jerry-rigging is huge since if something went wrong and you had a fire, insurance won't pay out.

I would hope that one would not see this as a permanent solution rather one to burn your buddy's house, your visiting, down with :) Doubling you charge rate where 115 is only available could make a difference in a trip. Like your buddy's house! because the 110v 12amp is not a solution.
 

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Just be sure that the two 120v outlets are both wired the same, and neither of them have the Hot and Ground crossed vs. the other.

Get a cheap outlet tester if you expect to do this in more than one place.
Not sure what you mean hot and ground crossed over, do you mean on the outlet? If so thats the most dangerous this I could imagine as it has the potential to kill you using that plug. Nor would it work more than once! :crying:I would think you mean hot and neutral reversed at the outlet?

Let me preface by saying, this is not ok, just like backfeeding a generator into your fuse panel during a power outage!, but sometime a man has gotta do what a mans gotta do. Thats why they invented breakers!, and thats why they subequently invented GFCI !

https://youtu.be/GlM6PE2kKVY I enjoy his videos, alway showing you what can go wrong with power :) and he's a fellow tech.

You would absolutely need to know whether they come from the same feed panel as well. In a home its most likely. Me I have a sub panel in my garage.
A polarity tester would be good.
Ground and Neutral are esentially the same(keeping it simple) so if off the same panel and one circuit was reversed, you would just have 110 with a parallel circuit neutral. Which would then tell you someone screwed up the wiring in the home which is far more dangerous than this idea.
Most homes are single phase, whick means there are only 2 hots. A single phase panel only has 2 hots.

In the end as stated, this is not a UL/CSA approved mod / device nor would it pass any inspection (I could be wrong would need to read a very large code book and this would be classed temporary wiring.)
 

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In my understanding of house wiring, this looks pretty good.

If both 120V outlets are the same phase....no voltage is present at the EVSE.

If either 120V outlet has H and N reversed, then 120V at the EVSE.

Proper situation..240V at the outlet.

In all three cases the one (or two) hot leads has a breaker in line with it, rated for the ampacity of the hot wire in use. If using 2 circuits, the max amperage is set by the smaller breaker (and the smaller wire).

Now I recall setting something up like this back in college when I needed 240V.... :nerd:

Happy to hear conflicting opinions...in what case would this allow you to defeat a breaker to 'burn down the house'??
 

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OK, I gots it.

This device will trip GFCI. Both 120V circuits need to be out of phase and NOT GFI. Since garage and outdoor outlets are (mostly) code required to be GFI, it could be hard to find an appropriate pair of outlets!
 

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OK, I gots it.

This device will trip GFCI. Both 120V circuits need to be out of phase and NOT GFI. Since garage and outdoor outlets are (mostly) code required to be GFI, it could be hard to find an appropriate pair of outlets!
Yup. I was lucky that our garage is old, and only has one interior outlet wired up with an exterior GFI outlet, on the other side of the wall. Switching to a different outlet solved the problem.
 

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I'd think it's worth using the Quick 220 box over building a dangerous cable. It's not worth electrocuting someone to safe a few bucks.
 

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I was thinking of purchasing this for my 2017 Chevy Bolt Premier since it is not feasible to install an L2 charger in my garage. I have 2 dedicated 110v electrical outlets. My main concern is safety. Looking to purchase a 12 amp model. Can someone advise on this?

Thx
 

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I was thinking of purchasing this for my 2017 Chevy Bolt Premier since it is not feasible to install an L2 charger in my garage. I have 2 dedicated 110v electrical outlets. My main concern is safety. Looking to purchase a 12 amp model. Can someone advise on this?

Thx


They sell a 15 amp model and two 20 amp models.


You want the model that conforms to your garage circuits.


Regardless of which model you buy, the stock OEM EVSE will only pull 12 amps on 220-240 volts, so any of these units would handle the load. Before you buy anything, make sure the two outlets in your garage are on separate legs of the 220-240 circuit.
 

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This is safe enough for a temporary solution but there are a few things you need to watch out for.

  • Every connection you add adds contact resistance and this setup adds a lot of connections, absolutely do not do this if anything is wet.
  • You must use an extension cord for at least one of the connections so make sure it is the appropriate guage.
  • Make sure to only store and use this with the EVSE and don't inadvertently let anything else be plugged into it.
  • Won't work with a GFCI
  • It must be plugged into both power sources before the EVSE is plugged in otherwise there could be a shock hazard.
  • If one of the circuit breakers trips it will still be live so don't make any wrong assumptions.
 

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Hello Everyone,

Thank You so much for the feedback.

Sorry for my delayed response I was relocating.

I was able to contract out an electrician who specializes
in L2 EV installs.

The electrician determined the following.

The Quick220 would not work since I do not have a 2nd outlet on a separate phase.

All of the other conditions for the Quick220 were met.

The circuit is 15A. The circuit can hold the 12A charge from the EV without tripping.

The electrician provided me an estimated L2 upgrade. He determined he could run a 220v

the line from the electrical meter/circuit panel to the garage which is 50ft away. Cost $2600.

I am renting this condo so it is not feasible for me.

I will just retain the 120v outlet @ 12A.

My question is can I use this extension cord.


The reason for the extension cord is the electrical outlet is right above the vehicle. With the vehicle 120v power adapter the brick portion dangles above the vehicle and wants to avoid it disconnecting prematurely and smashing the windshield or damaging the vehicle.

I just want to get the extension 8-10 ft from the garage unit to the wall where the OEM EVSE would be more stable.

Thank You

V/R
 

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I will just retain the 120v outlet @ 12A.

My question is can I use this extension cord.
Absolutely, 12/3 would work. Shorter is better, but 50 ft is perfectly within reason for 12 amps.

The only thing I'd note is to avoid unplugging at times when the car is actively drawing 12 amps. Arcing can increase resistance of contacts, which eventually may cause a plug or outlet to melt.
 

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I am in a similar boat: detached garage, high cost to upgrade buried wiring, and not my permanent location, so no point in the investment. L1 charging was good enough for summer, but at Minnesota winter temps, preheat takes too much power.

Where the wiring enters the garage is a disconnect switch. To support 240v EV charging, the garage's internal wiring was unhooked from this, so there was no power in the garage at all (that circuit was only powering a couple of outlets and the garage opener/light anyways). Then at the breaker panel, the garage circuit was converted from 20a 120v (single pole breaker) to 20a 240v (double pole breaker), coding the white wire to red at each end, with a 6-20 GFCI receptacle in the garage. In the garage, I plug a 16a 240v EVSE into this 20a 240v outlet (3.84kW, or about 122 miles in 8 hours).

For lighting, I put a $15 solar-powered motion lamp in the windowsill, and when I walk in or drive in, it turns on enough for me to not walk into stuff in the dark. I operate the garage door by hand (you know, that was actually a thing, once). When I need power inside the garage (e.g. working on a project), I have an extension cord with integrated GFCI plug running from a GFCI outlet at the house over to a power strip in the garage. It runs lights and tools, and can be removed when not needed.

Maybe a bit extreme, but I decided that I needed the EVSE more than the garage opener... at least until I move. Also, using the extension cord to run a drill while I'm standing there is safer than using an extension cord to run an EVSE when I'm asleep.
 
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