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I have a 2019 Chevy Bolt Premier, purchased in September, 2019. It has about 6800 miles on it and It has been trouble free so far. I noticed that cold weather reduces the car’s range so I wanted to find out how much hot weather would extend the range.

Starting with a full charge, I set out to test the range. I drove mostly on 2-lane roads at 50 – 55 mph with some interstate at 60 – 70 mph. The average for this trip was 4.1 miles/kWh which is better than the mileage in cooler weather, but not worth writing about. But I discovered something surprising that is worth writing about.

When the Bolt reached 30 kWh used, I noticed that the 20-bar graph was still showing 11 bars left. I kept an eye on this graph expecting it to soon fall to 10 bars, the halfway point. I waited and waited but it took longer than I expected. When it finally dropped to 10 bars, it was now showing 33 kWh used. Well, this didn’t make sense. One of the indicators is off by 10%. They would both be correct only if my Bolt has a 66 kWh battery pack. After about 170 miles, I headed home.

Next afternoon, I continued testing on similar highways until I ran out of juice. This wasn’t intentional. At the time I reached 230 miles driven, the (middle) range estimate was 36 miles, and I figured I could safely continue and reach home before the battery died at 266. But the battery died at 260.2 out on the highway about a quarter mile from home. It was totally dead, wouldn’t budge an inch. I called AAA and after almost two hours, a flat bed truck arrived. Surprise! The battery bounced back enough that the Bolt was able to climb up the ramp under its own power, and when we got home, able to power itself off the truck and into my carport.

Notice the 63.2 kWh used. Now It’s time for the rest of the story. Sometime about three months ago the range estimates suddenly jumped up about 10%. For an 80% charge I used to get an estimate of about 190-200 miles. Now I get about 220-225 miles. This mysterious jump was another reason for doing this range test. My Bolt has never been to the dealer so this change could only be done through OnStar.

So, what actually happened? Letting my imagination run wild, I’m guessing that Chevrolet, in preparing for the 2020 model year with its 66 kWh battery pack, started installing the larger pack in the last months of 2019. Installed, but not activated. The activation would be done later so as not to spoil the 2020 model’s major enhancement. I’m not sure why my Bolt only got 63.2 kWh and not 66, but you can’t get 63.2 from a 60 kWh pack. I think that my Bolt has the larger battery pack.

I would like to hear from other Bolt owners. Does anyone get more than 64 kWh used on a full charge? Please leave comments below.
DSCF1854__1595342424_47.25.53.143.jpg DSCF1855__1595342629_47.25.53.143.jpg DSCF1856__1595342688_47.25.53.143.jpg DSCF1863 (2)__1595342747_47.25.53.143.jpg
 

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Batteries hold more energy at higher temperatures. This is a known phenomenon. The converse is part of the triple-whammy of cold weather:
1) The heater is an energy hog
2) cold air is denser (greater air resistance)
3) cold batteries hold less energy to begin with.
 

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So, what actually happened?
Welcome to the forum.

Batteries are not straight forward. Depending on your charge/discharge profiles, the car has to estimate the capacity. This is why it is good to fully charge the battery and run it low once in while so the car can get a good calibration.
 

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I would like to hear from other Bolt owners. Does anyone get more than 64 kWh used on a full charge? Please leave comments below.
I am going to say your theory is correct. I have never seen that high a figure reported for any pre-2020 Bolt.
 

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My 2017 Bolt was able to get 60-61kWh
My 2019 Bolt (April 19) never has gotten past 59kWh,,seems like the kWh counter actually stops counting up when the car has no more energy bars but I can still get miles out of it.

In general I am still pretty close to 60kWh and getting my 238 mile range at 4mi/kWh.

SO I would assume you got a "2020" battery in your car!
 

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is the battery on the 2020 Bolt’s (per the label under drivers side) the same LG rated 57kwh as the prior model years?
I know the chemistry was altered to increase capacity to 66, but is the LG Battery rating the same? can someone look under their 2020 to see what it says?

prior model years all have 57kwh on the sticker I think (no expert here, just seem to recall they do). 54A85A7A-3939-4504-8E38-5A24BC4036BF.jpeg
 

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is the battery on the 2020 Bolt’s (per the label under drivers side) the same LG rated 57kwh as the prior model years?
64kWh
 

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Looks like your car was manufactured in June of 2019. IMO, that's too early for your theory to be correct. There is some manufacturing variance in battery pack kWh (just like every manufacturing process has variation). My guess is your battery is on the high side of the spec.
Edit: The "extra" 3 kWh could be due to regen.
 

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there you go, thank you.

just take a look under your car LloydB. Although I do doubt you have a 66kwh battery in your June 2019 build.
Guessing your 63kwh used was an anomoly. But what the heck do I know. :)
 

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I had a similar theory about my Bolt and wrote about it here:


My 2019 was built in September, 2018 so it seems unlikely I would have the newer battery. I haven't been able to do a comprehensive test as my extended road trips are now few and far between and I don't really see the point in running down the battery in day to day driving (which is also greatly reduced at the moment). For now it remains a curiosity.
 
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