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We hope everyone has been well and safe in these challenging times. Congress has been focused on many issues the past few months, including transportation and infrastructure policies. To that end, there is now a big package that will be voted on this week on the House side, which includes a number of policies that will accelerate greater adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), “Moving Forward” (that’s the bill name) into an electric transportation future.

Tell Congress you want the Moving Forward Act now—yes to H.R. 2.

Here are the top nine provisions we are focused on in H.R. 2:

  • Sec. 90431 - Federal EV tax credit: Increases the cap on the Section 30D federal EV tax credit to a total of 600,000 credits per auto manufacturer (versus the current 200,000 credits) - essentially, this will let the tax credit work for more drivers for a longer period of time.
  • Sec. 90432 - Used EV tax credit: Creates a new tax credit for buyers of used EVs, providing more options to consumers who are low-income. The credit is capped at the lesser of $2,500 credit or 30% of the sale price.
  • Sec. 33333 - Expanding Access to EVs in Underserved Communities: Requires that the Department of Energy conduct an assessment of the barriers and opportunities for deployment of EV charging stations in underserved communities and disadvantaged communities.
  • Sec. 33332 - EV Charging Station rebate program: Creates a new rebate program for installing EV charging stations at multi-unit dwellings, workplaces or commercial locations that are open to the public for at least 12 hours a day.
  • Sec. 1211: Accessibility, Rest Areas and Signage: Requires that EV charging stations that are funded through the Highway Trust Fund (and all other areas under title 23) to be usable by the majority of EV drivers. Also allows for EV charging stations at Interstate rest areas or park & ride locations. And, calls for the Department of Transportation to update the EV signage manuals in order to provide uniform signage to locate EV charging stations.
  • Sec. 50002 - U.S. Postal Service to go electric: Requires at least 75% of any new vehicles purchased by the U.S. Postal Service to be EVs. And, each post office location open to the public must have at least 1 charging station by 2026. The fleet of medium and heavy-duty trucks must also be at least 30% electric by 2030.
  • Sec. 33340 - U.S. Federal fleet to go electric: Requires that beginning in FY 2025, at least 50% of the vehicles purchased for the federal fleet must be EVs (and the other 50% must be alternative fueled vehicles).
  • Sec. 33338 - Funding for State Transportation Electrification Plans: Calls for funding for State Energy Transportation Plans, which must include plans to deploy a network of EV charging stations, reduce fossil fuels and improve air quality by transportation electrification.
  • Sec. 33337 - Utilities and Transportation Electrification: Requires states to consider allowing for measures to encourage deployment of EV charging stations by utilities, including letting the utility recover investments in the EV charging stations.
Contact your representative to support an electric transportation future and H.R. 2.

EVs provide benefits for all Americans—cleaner air, reduced carbon emissions, fuel and maintenance savings for consumers, improved national security, jobs in the innovation and tech sectors in the U.S.—just to name a few. The time is now to adopt strong policies that will help Americans reap all these benefits.

We will keep you updated as the bill moves forward.

Thanks,

Joel Levin
Executive Director
 

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We hope everyone has been well and safe in these challenging times. Congress has been focused on many issues the past few months, including transportation and infrastructure policies. To that end, there is now a big package that will be voted on this week on the House side, which includes a number of policies that will accelerate greater adoption of electric vehicles (EVs), “Moving Forward” (that’s the bill name) into an electric transportation future.

Tell Congress you want the Moving Forward Act now—yes to H.R. 2.

Here are the top nine provisions we are focused on in H.R. 2:

  • Sec. 90431 - Federal EV tax credit: Increases the cap on the Section 30D federal EV tax credit to a total of 600,000 credits per auto manufacturer (versus the current 200,000 credits) - essentially, this will let the tax credit work for more drivers for a longer period of time.
  • Sec. 90432 - Used EV tax credit: Creates a new tax credit for buyers of used EVs, providing more options to consumers who are low-income. The credit is capped at the lesser of $2,500 credit or 30% of the sale price.
  • Sec. 33333 - Expanding Access to EVs in Underserved Communities: Requires that the Department of Energy conduct an assessment of the barriers and opportunities for deployment of EV charging stations in underserved communities and disadvantaged communities.
  • Sec. 33332 - EV Charging Station rebate program: Creates a new rebate program for installing EV charging stations at multi-unit dwellings, workplaces or commercial locations that are open to the public for at least 12 hours a day.
  • Sec. 1211: Accessibility, Rest Areas and Signage: Requires that EV charging stations that are funded through the Highway Trust Fund (and all other areas under title 23) to be usable by the majority of EV drivers. Also allows for EV charging stations at Interstate rest areas or park & ride locations. And, calls for the Department of Transportation to update the EV signage manuals in order to provide uniform signage to locate EV charging stations.
  • Sec. 50002 - U.S. Postal Service to go electric: Requires at least 75% of any new vehicles purchased by the U.S. Postal Service to be EVs. And, each post office location open to the public must have at least 1 charging station by 2026. The fleet of medium and heavy-duty trucks must also be at least 30% electric by 2030.
  • Sec. 33340 - U.S. Federal fleet to go electric: Requires that beginning in FY 2025, at least 50% of the vehicles purchased for the federal fleet must be EVs (and the other 50% must be alternative fueled vehicles).
  • Sec. 33338 - Funding for State Transportation Electrification Plans: Calls for funding for State Energy Transportation Plans, which must include plans to deploy a network of EV charging stations, reduce fossil fuels and improve air quality by transportation electrification.
  • Sec. 33337 - Utilities and Transportation Electrification: Requires states to consider allowing for measures to encourage deployment of EV charging stations by utilities, including letting the utility recover investments in the EV charging stations.
Contact your representative to support an electric transportation future and H.R. 2.

EVs provide benefits for all Americans—cleaner air, reduced carbon emissions, fuel and maintenance savings for consumers, improved national security, jobs in the innovation and tech sectors in the U.S.—just to name a few. The time is now to adopt strong policies that will help Americans reap all these benefits.

We will keep you updated as the bill moves forward.

Thanks,

Joel Levin
Executive Director
While this is overall a positive thing, I still have some concerns.

In particular, Sec. 90431 doesn't do anything to address the real problems with the Federal EV Tax Credit. Namely, it's regressive, it's not a point-of-sale rebate, and it's broken down by automaker rather than the industry or segment (benefiting laggards who wait until later to develop EVs later).

I also find the verbiage on Sec. 1211 a bit concerning. What do they mean "majority of EV drivers"? My concern is that this will be used to provide public funds to pay for private, proprietary charging standards rather than open, public standards. It could also mean L2 AC instead of DC fast charging. I have nothing against L2 AC at rest stops (I've spent nights snoozing at a rest stop myself), but it shouldn't be the only standard installed. The primary use case for rest stops is still a 15 to 20 minute stop to take a bathroom, food, and stretch break.
 

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it's broken down by automaker rather than the industry or segment (benefiting laggards who wait until later to develop EVs later).
Yeah, I have mixed feelings about that. The tech leaders (risk takers) are somewhat punished by this but it does encourage more companies to get into the market.
 
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