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Discussion Starter #1
The factory tires of my Bolt spin and burn rubber when the car is pushed. I would like to get stickier tires without replacing the factory wheels. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what kind of tire would be a good fit? I live in LA and have no need for winter tires.
 

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There's a lot of 17" tire options out there, really depends on how much you're willing to spend. There's the more generic Goodyear and Michelin tires, then there are Dunlops.
 

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Dunlop DZ-102 on my SparkEV work well on dry pavement and have high wear rating, but they weren't the best in category on wet pavement in TR's tests.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks EldRick and Bazinga. If I put Michelin Pilot Super Sports on the car, does anyone know if mileage or performance would be significantly impacted? The car has such great torque its a shame to see a lot of it spin away.
 

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Thanks EldRick and Bazinga. If I put Michelin Pilot Super Sports on the car, does anyone know if mileage or performance would be significantly impacted? The car has such great torque its a shame to see a lot of it spin away.
As a rule of thumb, changing out the LRR tires for something stickier will cast you 3-7% in range. The softer/stickier (and heavier) the tire is, the more range you lose.
 

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You only have a couple of reasonable tire sizes in 17" PSS, and all are 45-section. Personally, I wouldn't put a 225x45 or wider on a 7" rim. What size are you thinking of?
 

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It would be tough to find heavier tires than the OEM.
Don't know the weight of the OEM's on the Bolt, but LRR tires are generally thinner in all areas to reduce weight. The self sealing goo will add at least some of that back, so hard to tell what the net effect would be.

Tire Rack lists the Bolt specific tread pattern Michelin Energy Saver A/S @ 20 lbs (listed as OE fitted, but no mention of self sealing?). The Premier A/S is 23 lbs.
 

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You only have a couple of reasonable tire sizes in 17" PSS, and all are 45-section. Personally, I wouldn't put a 225x45 or wider on a 7" rim. What size are you thinking of?
Thanks - I was hoping just to replicate the existing dimensions, but I guess thats not doable.:(
 

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It would be tough to find heavier tires than the OEM.
One should consider why the OEM tires are heavier when considering and trade to stickier tire. In part, the weight is due to the self sealing feature in the tire. This is important because the Bolt has no spare an no equipment to change a wheel in the field. If you simply change the tires and get a nail in the tire, you're calling a tow truck. With the OEM tire, you pull the nail out, possibly add a little air and keep driving. Pretty neat if you ask me.

The other reason is likely denser, firmer rubber compound. This is engineered to maximize range with an EV. The softer, lighter, stickier tire will get less range. We already see people concerned here when they get less than the 238 miles of estimated range. Much of this has to do with driving with a heavy right foot. If you are spinning he stock tires enough to contemplate sticky performance tires, the chances are great you're not getting 200+ miles advertised. Going sticky will only make this range worse.

However, IMO it's all good in the 'hood as long as your daily driving requirements are satisfied with this diminished range. I personally am a big fan of performance cars and spirited driving. I'm just putting this out there because I am hoping to never have to read a post where somebody with sticky tires bitches about the car never making the advertised 200+ miles of estimated range. I also don't want to read about a tale of woe where somebody gets stuck somewhere with flat, has to call a two truck and then curses Chevrolet for not including a jack and spare.
 

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One should consider why the OEM tires are heavier when considering and trade to stickier tire. In part, the weight is due to the self sealing feature in the tire. This is important because the Bolt has no spare an no equipment to change a wheel in the field. If you simply change the tires and get a nail in the tire, you're calling a tow truck. With the OEM tire, you pull the nail out, possibly add a little air and keep driving. Pretty neat if you ask me.

The other reason is likely denser, firmer rubber compound. This is engineered to maximize range with an EV. The softer, lighter, stickier tire will get less range. We already see people concerned here when they get less than the 238 miles of estimated range. Much of this has to do with driving with a heavy right foot. If you are spinning he stock tires enough to contemplate sticky performance tires, the chances are great you're not getting 200+ miles advertised. Going sticky will only make this range worse.

However, IMO it's all good in the 'hood as long as your daily driving requirements are satisfied with this diminished range. I personally am a big fan of performance cars and spirited driving. I'm just putting this out there because I am hoping to never have to read a post where somebody with sticky tires bitches about the car never making the advertised 200+ miles of estimated range. I also don't want to read about a tale of woe where somebody gets stuck somewhere with flat, has to call a two truck and then curses Chevrolet for not including a jack and spare.
LRR Tires are LIGHTER - that's one of the major ways they reduce the rolling resistance. Less rubber in both the tread area and sidewalls, and the rubber compound is harder (less traction).
Ultra High Performance Summer Tires in the 215/50 17 size used by the Bolt weigh in at 23-25 lbs. The Energy Saver (LRR) tires for the Bolt are 20 lbs.

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=175

At a minimum, you should likely carry a can of slime and a method to inflate a flat (mini compressor, cartridges, etc) if you ditch the self sealing OEM tires.
 

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FYI, when I swapped out the LRRs at the dealer before leaving in January, I brought a bathroom scale (you know the real scientific method!) and got 23# for the stock tires, 20# for my Nokian R2s, and about 22# for the stock wheels. It was during a snowstorm, so ymmv, but just putting it out there for reference.

It can be tricky to find weights on different tires, as different resources list different weights (or none at all) for the same tire.

I'm still in search of a W/Y/Z sticky tire for summer, and looking for lighter ones. Will probably pick the lightest+cheapest one, in case it hits the range too much, I'll consider putting the LRRs on <<<shudder!!>>> but probably not!
 

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It would be tough to find heavier tires than the OEM.
Weight is irrelevant to this discussion. The differences in weights between tires being discussed here are not going to have any significant effect on performance or range.

Softer compounds result in more, and lossier tread deformation and therefore more rolling resistance.
 

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I'm using Rikken Raptors ZR from TR in OEM size on my Bolt, and happy with them. They are an excellent price-performer for warm weather.

I'm hoping to find some light 7.5" wheels, and might still use 215x50 on them, or might go down to a 16" wheel and 225x50.
 

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LRR Tires are LIGHTER - that's one of the major ways they reduce the rolling resistance.
Ummm... this makes no sense [in physics]; just want to reduce misinformation. Rolling resistance is not correlated with weight - they're two completely different things, though both help with vehicle efficiency, but to conflate the two is incorrect.

Best,
Tal
 

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I'm using Rikken Raptors ZR from TR in OEM size(...)
I also went for the Riken Raptor ZR in OEM size. In San Diego we can run summer tires all year long. I have theses tires for roughly 1500 miles now.

They are definitely way stickier than the stock tires, a much more secure feel overall, no more wheel spin during acceleration or aggressive cornering. There is not a lot of feel difference at low speed, but the car really feel transformed when pushed a bit more and all the "wobbliness" is gone.

Now for the cons, there is an slight impact on the efficiency and range, I went from 4.1 to 3.7 Miles/kWh, during my normal commute, obviously efficiency drops even more during canyons and back road driving, as the car is now a real peach to enjoy dynamically.


 
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