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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got the recall letter to bring in my ‘20 for the 80% software. How many of you are like me and cannot comply with this? In the summer I could complete my 150 mile commute between 90 and 30% as recommended. But now it’s more like 90 to 20 and some days I need a little extra for errands after work. On extra cold days I’m filling to 95 and running it nearly to 15. I’m guessing GM cannot force me to bring it in as long as I “promise” to keep it between 90 and 30 😉
 

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I just got the recall letter to bring in my ‘20 for the 80% software. How many of you are like me and cannot comply with this? In the summer I could complete my 150 mile commute between 90 and 30% as recommended. But now it’s more like 90 to 20 and some days I need a little extra for errands after work. On extra cold days I’m filling to 95 and running it nearly to 15. I’m guessing GM cannot force me to bring it in as long as I “promise” to keep it between 90 and 30 😉
I am having trouble following you on this one. So between 90 and 30 is using 60% of your battery but being able to use 80% won't work for you?
Your worst case scenario says 95 down to 15 which I think is also 80%.
Maybe I'm misunderstanding where you are going with that?
 

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In the summer, OP could to the commute using <80% of battery, but cannot consistently do it in winter. And 95% to 15% is VERY different than white knuckling 80% to 0% and hoping you get home every trip.

I am also not getting the 80% cap software. In the winter we occasionally need >80% and Chevy has given NO indication of when we can expect a replacement on our 2017.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In the summer, OP could to the commute using <80% of battery, but cannot consistently do it in winter. And 95% to 15% is VERY different than white knuckling 80% to 0% and hoping you get home every trip.

I am also not getting the 80% cap software. In the winter we occasionally need >80% and Chevy has given NO indication of when we can expect a replacement on our 2017.
Agreed. The top 80% feels much different than the bottom 80%. I like to keep it out of the orange.

If I charge above 80%, I complete the charge within 30 min. of driving and only charge above 80% on the days I need it.
 

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I called the concierge line this week, wondering if there is any way to move up in the recall lottery. Told the rep I will be on the road with the Bolt Feb - April. She suggested not getting the 80% update because it would limit my range.

Maybe GM knows a bit more about our batteries than they tell us. She put me on hold for a few minutes while she pulled records on my VIN. I imagine if there were warning signs, she would have advised to get the 80% patch.
 

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I’m guessing GM cannot force me to bring it in as long as I “promise” to keep it between 90 and 30 😉
The car belongs to you, correct? You agreed to either purchase or lease it, so why can GM force you to do anything?

You don’t have to do any of it, not one single one of the recommendations. Your 100% decision to comply or not, and makes not one iota of difference to what GM will become legally obligated to do should they unilaterally decide to end the “voluntary” status of this recall. And they know this. They “hope“ we will think we have to lower their liability. It seems to be working 🤔
 

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I will never get an update that limits my range to lower than 100%. I need that range.

I don’t have a garage and I always parked at a distance because I have no choice in that manner.
 

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They can't even force a safety recall on you if you bring your car in for service. Just make sure the service writer knows that you are declining the recall. It will be written up on the work order.
 

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They can't even force a safety recall on you if you bring your car in for service. Just make sure the service writer knows that you are declining the recall. It will be written up on the work order.
I've had it forced on me before on my Prius. I mentioned it at Took our Prius in for the Coolant Pump Recall, they also did the Pedal Recall without my permission!.

I wasn't asked nor told it'd be done. This was during the whole Toyota SUA PR fiasco. And, no, Priuses didn't have the prone to stick CTS accelerator pedal mechanisms. Japanese made Toyotas (e.g. Prius) had Denso pedals that were of a different design and not prone to stick. However, they were taking precautions to prevent floor mat entrapment (which was the cause of a fatal Lexus crash).
 

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They can't even force a safety recall on you if you bring your car in for service. Just make sure the service writer knows that you are declining the recall. It will be written up on the work order.
But if you decline a safety recall and then something bad happens that can be attributed to your declination of the safety recall, I would think that would remove liability for the manufacturer.

And regarding the battery charging limits ... I thought GM was recommending limiting battery use on both ends of the spectrum: don’t charge above 80 and don’t let it drain below 20 (or - whatever the lower band was)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I will never get an update that limits my range to lower than 100%. I need that range.

I don’t have a garage and I always parked at a distance because I have no choice in that manner.
It’s like some of us bought the car to use or something. The extra 20 miles on the ‘20 was a big reason for paying a bit extra for a newer car. I’m glad I did - especially in the winter.
 

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But if you decline a safety recall and then something bad happens that can be attributed to your declination of the safety recall, I would think that would remove liability for the manufacturer.

And regarding the battery charging limits ... I thought GM was recommending limiting battery use on both ends of the spectrum: don’t charge above 80 and don’t let it drain below 20 (or - whatever the lower band was)?
Operative word: was. The current 80% cap, in conjunction with it’s diagnostics, removes all other charging guidelines.
 

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I've had it forced on me before on my Prius. I mentioned it at Took our Prius in for the Coolant Pump Recall, they also did the Pedal Recall without my permission!.

I wasn't asked nor told it'd be done. This was during the whole Toyota SUA PR fiasco. And, no, Priuses didn't have the prone to stick CTS accelerator pedal mechanisms. Japanese made Toyotas (e.g. Prius) had Denso pedals that were of a different design and not prone to stick. However, they were taking precautions to prevent floor mat entrapment (which was the cause of a fatal Lexus crash).
Wandering OT here, as is our wont, but I had a female friend who was panicked by the fake news story of the fatal Lexus crash. I proved to her the Lexus couldn't run away with her if she were trying to stop it. First, I demonstrated driving 60 MPH, simultaneously applying full throttle and full brakes. The car came to a smooth stop. Then, I had the 125-pound, 65-year old owner try the same thing. It took a bit of convincing, but once she could be made to hold hard on the brakes, she had the same result, a safe stop.

At the time, I was traveling continually on business and renting a different car every few days. I tried the full throttle test with every one I rented and every one of the dozens of cars and SUVs from all major manufacturers could be quickly and safely stopped by the brakes, regardless of the throttle position.

Bottom line - the hysteria which cost Toyota billions was the same driver issue which nearly put Audi out of business back in the "sudden unintended acceleration" debacle where investigation proved in every instance, the cause was drivers 'inadvertently' pressing the accelerator when intending to brake.

An interesting unintended consequence of most manufacturers the raising of the brake pedal resting position and moving it farther from the throttle. This made it more difficult for the unconscious to press the accelerator instead of the brake, but tests at the time proved it slowed emergency braking stopping times by a measurable fraction of a second. Stopping distances after recognizing the need increased.

jack vines
 

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This has always seemed intuitively obvious to me, because no car I've ever driven has been able to accelerate as strongly as it can brake.
Intuitively obvious to anyone who can think and drive at the same time. Completely oblivious are the NHTSA, the mass media who profit from fomenting hysteria and the numbnuts who sue auto manufacturers when they have a completely at-fault accident.

OTOH, this is an old school rant from when brakes were a mechanical/hydraulic thing. Today, with throttle, brakes and steering being digitally controlled, i.e. drive-by-wire, do all still have fail-safe mechanical backups?

FWIW, back when hydraulic brake systems were new, Henry Ford didn't trust them, so neither did many car owners. Hudson advertised their "Steeldraulic system - the safety of steel from pedal to wheel." IIRC, this was a backup cable-operated braking system, should the hydraulics fail.
 

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Intuitively obvious to anyone who can think and drive at the same time. Completely oblivious are the NHTSA, the mass media who profit from fomenting hysteria and the numbnuts who sue auto manufacturers when they have a completely at-fault accident.

OTOH, this is an old school rant from when brakes were a mechanical/hydraulic thing. Today, with throttle, brakes and steering being digitally controlled, i.e. drive-by-wire, do all still have fail-safe mechanical backups?

FWIW, back when hydraulic brake systems were new, Henry Ford didn't trust them, so neither did many car owners. Hudson advertised their "Steeldraulic system - the safety of steel from pedal to wheel." IIRC, this was a backup cable-operated braking system, should the hydraulics fail.
In Driver's Training in the '70s, we were taught to use the mechanical cable-driven emergency brake pedal to stop the vehicle, in case the hydraulic system failed. You used it by pulling the e-brake release handle out, while pushing the little e-brake pedal, as needed. I spent the next several days of practice using only the e-brake to stop. When Japanese cars hit the shores, the same could be done by holding down the release button on top of the e-brake handle in the center console, while pulling up on the handle to engage the e-brake, as needed. It was much easier to use than the little e-brake pedal.

With electronically actuated e-brakes on newer vehicles, we've lost that ability.
 

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With electronically actuated e-brakes on newer vehicles, we've lost that ability.
While the stop will be more abrupt, you can still stop a car with an e-brake while in motion.
 
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