Chevy Bolt EV Forum banner
21 - 40 of 81 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
I've had it forced on me before on my Prius. I mentioned it at Took our Prius in for the Coolant Pump Recall, they also did the Pedal Recall without my permission!.

I wasn't asked nor told it'd be done. This was during the whole Toyota SUA PR fiasco. And, no, Priuses didn't have the prone to stick CTS accelerator pedal mechanisms. Japanese made Toyotas (e.g. Prius) had Denso pedals that were of a different design and not prone to stick. However, they were taking precautions to prevent floor mat entrapment (which was the cause of a fatal Lexus crash).
The person that wrote you up simply didn't understand their job. What DarkFX said id completely true. A dealer cannot force a recall (or any work for that matter) on a customer's vehicle without their consent. When I was writing, however, I did see more than one time where an absentminded technician didn't even see the notes on the writeup saying the customer did NOT want the recall completed, and just went ahead and did it. It is not a common occurrence, but it can be an honest mistake sometimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Agreed. The top 80% feels much different than the bottom 80%. I like to keep it out of the orange.

If I charge above 80%, I complete the charge within 30 min. of driving and only charge above 80% on the days I need it.
I guess we are rebels...we charge daily, in our garage, to 93%(first step below 100% on Target Charge level), and at the end of the day it is usually about 50%...but when we went on a weekend trip we charged to 100% shortly before leaving, passed one DCFC, ran it down to about 20 miles on GOM before hitting the next fast charger. This avoided a 2nd charging stop. Did the same on the way home a few days later. I don't want the 80% limit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
I guess we are rebels...we charge daily, in our garage, to 93%(first step below 100% on Target Charge level), and at the end of the day it is usually about 50%...but when we went on a weekend trip we charged to 100% shortly before leaving, passed one DCFC, ran it down to about 20 miles on GOM before hitting the next fast charger. This avoided a 2nd charging stop. Did the same on the way home a few days later. I don't want the 80% limit.
Everyone has to make their own decision for their use case and personal assessment of risk. I was originally going to refuse it as well, but after re-evaluating how we use the car, 80% really won’t hamper us, so I have an appointment for Thursday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
In Driver's Training in the '70s, we were taught to use the mechanical cable-driven emergency brake pedal to stop the vehicle, in case the hydraulic system failed. You used it by pulling the e-brake release handle out, while pushing the little e-brake pedal, as needed. I spent the next several days of practice using only the e-brake to stop. When Japanese cars hit the shores, the same could be done by holding down the release button on top of the e-brake handle in the center console, while pulling up on the handle to engage the e-brake, as needed. It was much easier to use than the little e-brake pedal.

With electronically actuated e-brakes on newer vehicles, we've lost that ability.
They are not e-brakes, they are just parking brakes.
 

·
Super Moderator
2022 Bolt EUV Premier
Joined
·
700 Posts
They are not e-brakes, they are just parking brakes.
They've always been labeled as parking brakes. While some may consider them emergency brakes (and they're certainly useful for that), that's not their primary function. As for myself, I've only used the term e-brake to denote electronically controlled parking brakes, as compared to the previous mechanical versions that were generally activated via a cable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,877 Posts
The person that wrote you up simply didn't understand their job. What DarkFX said id completely true. A dealer cannot force a recall (or any work for that matter) on a customer's vehicle without their consent. When I was writing, however, I did see more than one time where an absentminded technician didn't even see the notes on the writeup saying the customer did NOT want the recall completed, and just went ahead and did it. It is not a common occurrence, but it can be an honest mistake sometimes.
Needs bringing out Hanlon's Razor:
Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

jack vines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
That is why the electric parking brake is only for parking and not to be used to stop the car in an emergency situation.
Per the manual:

If the EPB is applied while the vehicle is moving, the vehicle will decelerate as long as the switch is held up. If the switch is held up until the vehicle comes to a stop, the EPB will remain applied.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Per the manual:

If the EPB is applied while the vehicle is moving, the vehicle will decelerate as long as the switch is held up. If the switch is held up until the vehicle comes to a stop, the EPB will remain applied.
I am incorrect, you are right… my bad
Ya can learn something new every day, thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,995 Posts
In Driver's Training in the '70s, we were taught to use the mechanical cable-driven emergency brake pedal to stop the vehicle, in case the hydraulic system failed. You used it by pulling the e-brake release handle out, while pushing the little e-brake pedal, as needed. I spent the next several days of practice using only the e-brake to stop. When Japanese cars hit the shores, the same could be done by holding down the release button on top of the e-brake handle in the center console, while pulling up on the handle to engage the e-brake, as needed. It was much easier to use than the little e-brake pedal.
The parking / emergency brake lever between the front seats predated the mass influx of Japanese cars in the US. VW Beetles (the air cooled ones) had that type of parking / emergency brake lever. It was also found on some American cars, such as the Corvette starting in 1967.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I'm just taking the risk. How many cars have gone up? About 20? I got a replacement 2021 with a new (but defective) Battery, so I figure I went through one hoop already to lower the risk of a fire. The next step needs to be a new battery pack, but I won't accept the 80% limit.
 

·
Registered
2021 Chevy Bolt
Joined
·
164 Posts
As I posted in another thread, I think it's wise to get the software update, but I also understand that everyone's personal situation is different.
So I don't begrudge Bolt owners who refuse to get it.

As for me, the only time I've ever needed 100% of the battery capacity was on road trips, and I embark on those maybe twice per year?
Even then, DCFC would reduce significantly once my battery reached 80% SOC.

I like the fact that all of the other restrictions have been lifted, and I can now 'safely' utilize the bottom 30% of the battery.
Of course, I could do that before the update, but I was taking on a higher level of 'risk'.

I also like the fact that, as a result of the diagnostic tools within the update, I might get a new battery quicker.
And as I stated in the other thread, if my Bolt still goes up in flames, at least I can tell GM (and/or the judge!?) that I played by the rules!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
As I posted in another thread, I think it's wise to get the software update, but I also understand that everyone's personal situation is different.
So I don't begrudge Bolt owners who refuse to get it.

As for me, the only time I've ever needed 100% of the battery capacity was on road trips, and I embark on those maybe twice per year?
Even then, DCFC would reduce significantly once my battery reached 80% SOC.

I like the fact that all of the other restrictions have been lifted, and I can now 'safely' utilize the bottom 30% of the battery.
Of course, I could do that before the update, but I was taking on a higher level of 'risk'.

I also like the fact that, as a result of the diagnostic tools within the update, I might get a new battery quicker.
And as I stated in the other thread, if my Bolt still goes up in flames, at least I can tell GM (and/or the judge!?) that I played by the rules!
I have tried 3 times to get the update done on my 17, they keep telling me as long as my status says remedy not available they cannot install it. This was 3 different dealerships. I even called GM and talked to two different people and they said that they should be able to do it, but GM cannot force them to install the update.
So I guess I will take my chances.
 

·
Registered
2017 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
1,294 Posts
I have tried 3 times to get the update done on my 17, they keep telling me as long as my status says remedy not available they cannot install it. This was 3 different dealerships. I even called GM and talked to two different people and they said that they should be able to do it, but GM cannot force them to install the update.
So I guess I will take my chances.
As I posted elsewhere, I didn't get anywhere with the dealer I was working with until I exhibited Karen behavior: very loud and very insistent. If you have time to go to the dealership, explain to them loudly about their incompetence and lack of reading comprehension.

It sucks I know. But unfortunately until you can get their attention, they won't look past the "remedy not available" and get to the fact that the bulletin specifically states that the software update can be done even though the recall is still marked as "remedy not available"

This is one of the tactics I learned from my wife. She does not accept poor customer service and will let anyone who can hear know about it. It's surprising how often tunes get changed in the face of a loud frustrated customer.

ga2500ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
As I posted elsewhere, I didn't get anywhere with the dealer I was working with until I exhibited Karen behavior: very loud and very insistent. If you have time to go to the dealership, explain to them loudly about their incompetence and lack of reading comprehension.

It sucks I know. But unfortunately until you can get their attention, they won't look past the "remedy not available" and get to the fact that the bulletin specifically states that the software update can be done even though the recall is still marked as "remedy not available"

This is one of the tactics I learned from my wife. She does not accept poor customer service and will let anyone who can hear know about it. It's surprising how often tunes get changed in the face of a loud frustrated customer.

ga2500ev
Just don’t want to piss them off and they do a half assed job, I’ve had that happen before when I went off on a service department.
 

·
Registered
2017 Bolt Premier
Joined
·
1,294 Posts
Just don’t want to piss them off and they do a half assed job, I’ve had that happen before when I went off on a service department.
I understand. But other than trying to call other dealerships, which you've already done, what can you do to clarify the situation.

Put in a call to the general manager of the dealerships. Try calmly explaining the situation and see if they can get the service manager to listen.

This is GMs fault because they posted this software update outside of their normal recall process. But unfortunately it falls to you as the customer to get the dealership to listen.

This is just software. Literally it's plugging in an OBD2 cable and loading some software from GM's servers. Hopefully they can't screw that up.

ga2500ev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
I understand. But other than trying to call other dealerships, which you've already done, what can you do to clarify the situation.

Put in a call to the general manager of the dealerships. Try calmly explaining the situation and see if they can get the service manager to listen.

This is GMs fault because they posted this software update outside of their normal recall process. But unfortunately it falls to you as the customer to get the dealership to listen.

This is just software. Literally it's plugging in an OBD2 cable and loading some software from GM's servers. Hopefully they can't screw that up.

ga2500ev
I read it’s a pretty involved process, involving 2 or 3 different computers in the car. The Tech is supposed to stay with the car the entire time the update is being done because he has things to do for it to load properly. There is a thread on here somewhere describing the process.
 

·
Registered
2022 Bolt EUV Premier w/ Sun n Sound
Joined
·
339 Posts
Just don’t want to piss them off and they do a half assed job, I’ve had that happen before when I went off on a service department.
FWIW I find they do that regardless.........the half assed part that is.
 
21 - 40 of 81 Posts
Top